Quotes: Out of Focus

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"Whatever happened to my part?
It was exciting at the start
Now we're halfway through Act Two,
And I've had nothing yet to do!"
The Lady of the Lake, Spamalot, Whatever Happened To My Part?

Keiki is the main character of this series (although that's debatable).
—Official Keiki character bios

kyusiko: i still relevant
coobie: no

Did you ever feel like... like somepony made you a background pony in your own story? [...] Like... Like you're reading a story, right? And you start out, and the first chapter or two you think 'oh, this story is all about THIS character! the peasant colt in the cottage!' and you go along and... then somewhere in the middle suddenly it's not anymore, it's all about the lonely princess in the tower or the wandering knight and the peasant colt is just a pony in the background for the rest of the story. I kinda feel like that. Like I'm the peasant pony and the writer's just forgot all about me and gone off and did something with somepony else. [...] When we first got here, Mom and me, I mean, everything just kept happening. And stuff started building up, and building up, and it felt like, I dunno, like something big and important was going to happen to me— but instead it all happened to Spike. [...] I feel like I came all this way and something was supposed to happen... I was supposed to make something happen... and I never did.
-Nyx, Reality Checks Nyxverse, Nyx's family, final chapter.

I know I'm a Power Ranger, but c'mon. You guys are the ones that really... you know... lit it up. I don't feel like I did my share...Oh, actually yeah, I did do something special. I got turned into a stone statue, and everyone had to come and save me. Awesome.
Madison, Power Rangers Mystic Force ("The Light")

    reviews 

Poor Roxanne Dawson. When the show began B’Elanna was one of the characters that the writing team were most invested in – you could tell by the way it was her story that they focused on immediately after the pilot. There was a nice little character arc running through the first three seasons that saw the character go from an aggressive bully to a focused, professional Starfleet engineer and installments such as Dreadnought, Remember and Blood Fever were some of the best of their years. Season four was where it all started to go wrong (it seems that with the advent of Jeri Ryan’s Seven of Nine that Torres was neglected almost as if the writers are commenting that you can’t have two such sophisticated characters on the show) and Torres underwent something of a character deterioration and the few times they could be bothered to give her an episode it seems that they felt the need to make an out-of-character regression. Dawson’s pregnancy might have had something to do with Torres vanishing into the shadows, but episodes like Day of Honor, Extreme Risk (B’Elanna is addicted to extreme sports) and now Juggernaut (B’Elanna cannot control her anger – this is direct throwback to season one’s Parallax which was the second episode so it feels like we are back where we started with the character) do her no favours at all...When Torres blatantly insults the Captain (‘Diplomacy, Janeway’s answer to everything’) it feels shockingly out of character considering what the two of them went through together in the first couple of years. That relationship has been completely ignored in favour of the Janeway/Seven duo and its almost as if you can hear Dawson’s disdain. Isn’t it fortunate that in an episode that deals with Torres’ anger she has to solve the problem by beating up the core labourer with a giant pipe.
Joe Ford on Star Trek: Voyager, "Juggernaut"

This is a Superman show where Green Arrow is more of a character, because Superman himself is forced to be static. And it’s obvious that everyone involved has realized this. That’s why they’ve introduced Green Arrow, and the JSA, and all those other guys, because the only alternative is a show about Clark Kent not being Superman, and who in the hell wants to watch that?
ComicsAlliance on Smallville ("Finale")

Bret versus Flair took place at the first PPV of the year, Souled Out. The event, largely considered a success, drew a sellout 5,087 fans to Dayton's Hara Arena...And how did WCW reward these two men for having such a great match, drawing such great ratings, and popping such a great buy rate? They ended the feud cold-turkey and took Flair off TV for several weeks. The reasoning was that too many people were cheering for Flair, and they wanted him to be a bad guy. If the people couldn't play along and boo him, then they would be punished with his absence. (Ironically, later in the year, when Bret was getting a strong babyface reaction despite being booked as a heel, he too was removed from television.)
R. D. Reynolds and Bryan Alvarez, The Death of WCW

This is where it started to sink in. It just became more and more dire, as clown after clown... after joke... after dweeb...after loser paraded out, and it just got sadder, and sadder, and you just started sinking lower into your chair...The WWE roster, they're all losers.

Whoever comes down that ramp, I'm saying, is a loser. In-character. Their character is a loser.

So whenever their music hit you just didn't care. When The Miz came out you were like 'sigh.' Then R Truth came out and you were like 'groan.' Adam Rose. 'hrmmm.' Kofi. 'meh.' Cesaro. I like Cesaro, but the thing is he's been killed so m— [beat] whatever. Titus' O'Neil. The rumor is that they were going to try to have him tie Santino's shortest-ever Rumble appearance record of 00:1. And he fucked it up...So the gimmick here is that Titus O'Neil sucks. Thanks. That's a great gimmick. That you suck. You suck so much that you failed at sucking. So you blew your chance at sucking. That's great. Wow, Titus, I don't see much in your future.