Quotes: Designated Villain

Fan Works

Dr-J33: Remind me why [Titan] is the badguy again?
Mars: Because the author says so.


DAVE: what kind of villain is someone you never met who hardly did anything evil to you or your friends directly
DAVE: or even to anyone in your universe for that matter other than through some vague insidious influence
DAVE: who even is this guy and why should i hate him
DAVE: am i really supposed to be pissed off at a green muscle monster i never met
DAVE: cause i aint pissed off at no muscle monster

Web Original

They must shut up and put up, and forebearingly in hope for reform, or they become malignant. To resist is to become wicked, by definition...I’ve always cheered for the baddies. I've always empathised and sympathised with them more than the heroes, the lovers, the plucky kids, the brave dogs, etc. It’s quite startling how often the ‘baddies’ are considerably more sympathetic, how often they are declared bad by authorial fiat, how often they have a good point.

And, again, to recap: we are to boo the organized, Christmas-loving family man, while we are to cheer the reindeer punching thief who destroys half the town whose primary hobby is ignoring his family.

They suggest there is a massive gulf between Ransom’s approach and Janeway’s, and whilst one ship is pristine thanks to its Captain’s decisions and one is on the verge of collapse (yay Equinox, boo Voyager), she has also made some morally unsound choices and taken the occasional questionable measure to push herself along. It's what makes Ransom a more satisfying character (despite the fact he only appears in one story), because he at least knows the kind of man he is (one who will go to any lengths to get home) whereas Janeway has convinced herself that she always takes the moral high ground when that is hardly the case on an episode-by-episode basis. When Ransom opens up to Janeway and says that there were times that they almost forgot that they were human beings, the good Captain should have been a little more savvy at what he is actually trying to tell her about the situation they are currently in.
Joe Ford on Star Trek: Voyager, "Equinox"

In the first part of 'Sanctuary,' Magneto made what was — for his situation — the perfectly rational decision to throw a giant rock out into space and build a little town on it so that he could live without fear of being murdered by giant racist robots and the people who build them. He also announced his intentions to do this peacefully and then singlehandedly liberated a concentration camp while our heroes stood around and watched, and for some reason, everyone got super pissed off about this.
Chris Sims on ''X-Men, "Sanctuary, Part 2"

It’s a story with the names of the characters, and some of the major scenes, but the underlying narrative simply isn’t the story of Superman. It’s about a guy with an asshole father who got stuck in a podunk town and casually betrayed by every friend he made, including a superhuman who professed to be his best friend but constantly doubted him behind his back and lied to him to his face. When the show embraced that and stopped pretending it was about Superman, that was when the show was it its best... When the show lost its protagonist, Lex, then it became an empty shell that traded on rote pandering towards fans of scenes and characters we all recognize from other media.
Chris Sims and David Uzumeri on Smallville ("Finale")

Here's the logic.

'Hi, Clark. It's me, Lex. You say you have a sick friend here?'

Clark gives a noncommittal grunt that borders on communication.

'Well, how about I give her all of the best doctors in the world and do my best to heal her?'

'No! Me heal!'

'Uh, Clark?'


Lex walks away, shaking his head.
Neal Bailey on Smallville ("Tomb")

One of the family leaders, O’Flynn, decides it may just be in the best interests of everyone if they killed the few remaining zombies left on the island. Because you know, I would feel a lot safer if I didn’t think my sleep would be interrupted by a zombie eating my intestines like a four year old eats a plate of spaghetti. The other family, the Muldoons, thinks that is a monstrous idea and banish O’Flynn from the island. I then decided to rename the island Moron Island because I could not identify with any of the people or their actions.

"Medusa was cursed by the very goddess she served, Athena, who also gave Perseus the mirrored shield he used to slay her. Raped, betrayed by her god, hunted down like a beast in her own home while she was pregnant, her own children stolen from her and used to glorify and aide her killers and betrayers. And she’s supposed to be the monster?"

Web Video

A matured Giygas is tasked with killing George so that humans may never know the power of PSI! But George and Maria are his only family... He gets over his moral dilemma by remembering that George was the worst dad ever.
LORE, "EarthBound Lore in a Minute!"

Jay: Instead of stealing the cash, the group burn it, making a statement calling banks greedy and that they should only take what they need.
V1: I thought that was pretty cool! Immediately he's less of fuckin' black-and-white, "he's evil, Miz is good", he's got a reason for doing what he's doing, and it makes sense. And that's the route to all good baddies: you should empathize with them.
Jay: I feel a bit worried about that. Like, you need good writing to follow that. Otherwise you risk people hating the good guy and liking the bad guy.
V1: (That's what happened to me, of course.)
OSW Review on The Marine 3: Homefront

It seems to me that if you want to show how evil the Borg are, you should come up with something a little more hostile than fighting to protect their own property from invaders. The Borg's evil plan is, 'Leave us alone! ...please?' Any time you can replace your hero with Zapp Brannigan, you might want to reshape the story a little.
SFDebris on Star Trek: Voyager, "Endgame"