Quotes: Arcadia

But chiefly thou
In that clear air took'st life: in Arcady
The haunted, land of song; and by the wells
Where most the gods frequent.
Robert Louis Stevenson, Et Tu In Arcadia Vixisti

Elder Brother. Thyrsis! whose artful strains have oft delayed
The huddling brook to hear his madrigal,
And sweetened every musk-rose of the dale.
How camest thou here, good swain? Hath any ram
Slipped from the fold, or young kid lost his dam,
Or straggling wether the pent flock forsook?
How couldst thou find this dark sequestered nook?

How sweet is the Shepherd’s sweet lot!
From the morn to the evening he strays;
He shall follow his sheep all the day,
And his tongue shall be filled with praise.

For he hears the lamb's innocent call,
And he hears the ewe's tender reply;
He is watchful while they are in peace,
For they know when their Shepherd is nigh.
Some readers cannot enjoy the shepherds because they know (or they say they know) that real country people are not more happy or more virtuous than any one else; but it would be tedious here to explain to them the many causes (reasons too) that have led humanity to symbolize by rural scenes and occupations a region in the mind which does exist and which should be visited often. If they know the region, let them try to people it with tram conductors or policemen, and I shall applaud any success they may have; if not, who can help them?
―- C. S. Lewis, The Allegory of Love: A Study in Medieval Tradition

A sylphlike view, an old mirage
A paragon of beauty
A land of leal under skies divine..
Edenbridge, "The Grand Design"