Playing With / Strawman Has a Point

Basic Trope: Fridge Logic turns a supposedly flimsy argument into a sensible one.
  • Straight: Stacy wishes for a Super Registration Act. Heather opposes this. They argue, with Stacy supposedly being incredibly wrong and Heather being totally right- but Heather's arguments boil down to 'Supers are the Master Race so they should get to do what they want and not have to follow any rules', while Stacy is pointing out that such legislation would help organize heroes, give them tangible benefits for their work, and the only real regulations are 'don't be a jackass and actually act like a hero'.
  • Exaggerated: Stacy hates and fears Supers for personal reasons and her oppressive ideas for registration border on enslaving them. However, she's saying this in the context of a world where most superhumans are Smug Supers who freely abuse their powers and treat normal people like Stacy as expendable playthings, so Heather's arguments against registration, which would look perfectly reasonable in most universes with superheroes, look like she's just trying to defend the (awful) status quo and make sure nothing gets any better, while Stacy's arguments look like The Extremist Was Right.
  • Downplayed: Stacy dislikes supers and agrees with the registration act. Heather disagrees. They have a polite argument where both state good reasons for their positions, in which Stacy comes off as having more evidence for her side.
  • Justified:
    • Although the character is very clearly a strawman, they weren't set up to be wrong or right, they were set up so that their attitude would help the plot along. Stacy's rant on the Super Registration Act and Heather's bickering with her was merely there to show what strong feelings people have on the Super Registration Act and set up the problems supers will face while the act is debated.
    • It's just plain bad writing.
  • Inverted: Heather, our Designated Heroine, is later revealed to herself be a strawman for her position- she's a superheroine herself, but is actually a Smug Super who uses her powers to bully people and moonlights as a supervillainess. She's arguing against the regulation act not because she thinks it will hamstring actual heroics, but because she's afraid that if someone started actually scrutinizing her (as someone would if the regulation act was passed), they will reveal her less savory actions to the public and she won't get a 100% Adoration Rating any more.
  • Subverted: Stacy's points seems perfectly fine at first glance, but later it's revealed that her most compelling argument is flat out wrong or misunderstood.
  • Double Subverted: ...However, closer examination and Fridge Logic enable the audience to see the matter from her point of view and realize that one of her lesser arguments was even more relevant than her primary one.
  • Parodied: Stacy is the Only Sane Woman, but the Rule of Funny in this universe means that the more sense an argument makes, the less likely it is to be accepted.
  • Zig Zagged: Debate and Switch or Armed with Canon. In short, the creators can't make up their minds who is supposed to be "right" or "wrong".
  • Averted:
    • Black and White Morality (where the strawmen really are wrong)
    • Gray and Grey Morality (where both are equal parts right and wrong)
    • Good Versus Good (where no one is wrong).
    • Stacy is presented as having good points and she is not made into a straw character - her points are backed up and it's quite easy to understand why she says what she does.
  • Enforced: The executives say, "People want to admire superheroes, not fear them. Stacy's argument warns people to Beware the Superman, so it needs to be presented as wrong."
  • Lampshaded: "How come the bad guys are the only ones making any sense?"
  • Invoked: Stacy is brought in to argue in favor of the Super Registration Act because she knows all the perfectly reasonable motivations for it, despite the fact that those enacting it have twisted her words until her argument has Gone Horribly Wrong.
  • Exploited: The writer agrees with Stacy, but Executive Meddling enforces that she's in the wrong. So, outlining the reasonable arguments in the character we're supposed to disagree with is a form of Writer Revolt.
  • Defied: At one point, Heather says to Stacy: "Wait a minute. I don't agree with persecuting Supers, but you have a perfectly good point otherwise. Maybe it's time we discussed a third option?"
  • Discussed: "I've listened to Stacy and Heather debate, and for all that the news has presented Stacy as being wrong, she seem to be making a lot of sense."
  • Conversed: "At first I wanted the story to have an arc about fighting against a Super Registration Act, but then I realized that with how the story has built supers up, there's no real way to make the pro-act side look wrong. Even if they use someone as obnoxious as Stacy as a proponent of that side, she'll look like she'd decided to start being reasonable for once."
  • Deconstructed:
    • Stacy's point may have been right, but when she gets her way she proves that she's bad at sticking to it, and she ends up becoming the tyrant she feared supers would be.
    • After their argument, Heather winds up changing her mind and ends up agreeing with Stacy.
  • Reconstructed: Stacy herself is kicked out of office, and her successor is a Reasonable Authority Figure who does stick to Stacy's reasonable original argument, but without the later unreasomable additions.
  • Played For Laughs: Heather the Heroic is seen flying off with a bank vault carrying several Thief Bags, and the crowd applauds her while Stacy desperately tries to argue that supers shouldn't be able to always do as they please.
  • Played For Drama: Stacy becomes the Unwitting Pawn of the supervillains pulling the strings; her argument is quite reasonable, but they know that simply proposing a Super Registration Act would trigger knee-jerk responses from superheroes who do not want to be regulated for whatever reason- from just liking their privacy (like Rachel) to not wanting there to be an investigative office to call them out on their actions (like Heather).

If you look closely, there's a strong case for going back to Strawman Has a Point.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/PlayingWith/StrawManHasaPoint