Old Shame: Western Animation

  • The Disney cartoon "The Golden Touch" (1935). Out of dissatisfaction with one of his directors Disney directed it himself. The cartoon was a huge box office bomb and animators were reminded never to speak of it again. Disney too never personally directed a short cartoon again.
  • Most of the cartoons at the Disney Afternoon block are Old Shames, with the exception of Gargoyles, DuckTales, Darkwing Duck and Chip 'n Dale Rescue Rangers. TaleSpin is a particular old shame, partially due to quality and partially due to legal issues surrounding the originally unauthorized use of King Louie.
  • Donnie Dunagan, the voice of the title character in Bambi as a child, kept the role a secret through his time in the Vietnam War serving as a Marine Corps boot camp commander, afraid the other soldiers wouldn't take him seriously and call him "Major Bambi." Eventually a marine discovered his secret, and he's been more open about the role since, even saying he now loves the attention the role brings him.
  • Most of the stuff John Kricfalusi worked on before The Jetsons reboot in the '80s.
  • Billy West does not have fond memories of working on The Ren & Stimpy Show, mainly because John was a tremendous Jerkass to him and everyone else working on the show, which is why he didn't come back to reprise his role as Stimpy for the ill-fated Adult Party Cartoon revival.
  • According to Word of God, the Earthworm Jim cartoon series was the product of Executive Meddling — the game creators were coerced into making the show in order to support game sales. Ironically it's one of more beloved and more accurate adaptations of a video game franchise. Go fig.
  • Chuck Jones once said that if he were allowed to, he would burn the negatives to every Looney Tunes short he made before 1948 (which had slow pacing and were too much like something Disney's animation company would do). The one short that seemed to get the most contempt from him was Elmer's Candid Camera.
  • Fellow Looney Tunes animator Norm McCabe was seen later in life visibly cringing during showings of his cartoons. He was especially ashamed of his World War II propaganda cartoons Tokio Jokio and The Ducktators, both of which heavily mocked the Japanese. Shortly before his death, he publicly apologized for them.
  • Richard Williams was so devastated at what happened to his flagship film The Thief and the Cobbler that he refused to acknowledge the film's existence for a long time.
  • According to Lauren Faust, Quest for Camelot is this for all the animators who worked on it due to the Executive Meddling involved that ultimately led to it failing in the box office.
  • Carl Barks, Don Rosa and some of the 9 Old Men grew to hate the animated show DuckTales for not being true to the stories that Carl Barks wrote, as well as taking away TMS's time away from Little Nemo: Adventures in Slumberland (in fact, two of them— Frank Thomas and Ollie Johnston— did work on Little Nemo just so that they could work on something that was outside of what Disney was dishing out at the time).
    • Don Rosa at least mellow out and admitted he really didn't hate the show and more or less said it was the equivalent of Superfriends was to the DC comics.
  • Maurice LaMarche hated working on the Popples. He is quoted as saying each recording session made him want to vomit because of how sickeningly cute the show was.
    • He also, along with everybody else involved, disliked working on Pinky, Elmyra & the Brain for having retooled the wildly popular Pinky and the Brain. This is evidenced in Brain's line, "I deeply resent this" at the end of the theme song.
  • There are three shows Rob Paulsen worked on that he is not proud of. The first is Coconut Fred's Fruit Salad Island, because he knew it was a shameless SpongeBob SquarePants knockoff. Then there's The Snorks, because he is one of the many people who thought it was an underwater rip-off of The Smurfs. The last one is the Bubsy pilot.
    • He's also said Space Cats was an awful cartoon, but he enjoyed working with his friends Townsend Coleman and Pat Fraley on it.
  • Scott McNeil feels this way about the Battletoads pilot.
  • Trey Parker and Matt Stone feel this way about the first three seasons of South Park, as Parker states outright in a 2011 Entertainment Weekly article: "It's just embarrassing to watch".
    • The only season 2 episode that they even seem to remotely like is "Not Without My Anus", as they cited it as something "weird and different," though most fans don't agree, as it was pointless filler that interrupted the conclusion of the "Cartman's Mom is a Dirty Slut" two-parter, in which Cartman tries to find the identity of his biological father. But it was April Fool's Day when it aired, so it was fitting.
    • In a recent interview, they also feel ashamed of the way they portrayed Gary Condit and the Ramseys in the episode "Butters Very Own Episode", after both parties were proven by DNA evidence to be innocent.
  • Steve Moncuse, who created the comic book Fish Police, is really unhappy with how the cartoon version of it (which was made as a competitor show to The Simpsons) turned out. Moncuse had nothing to do with the cartoon other than a creator's credit, and the cartoon was very much an In Name Only adaptation. He said in one interview, "the less said about it, the better."
  • Charles M. Schulz felt particularly bad after the infamous "football scene" from It's Your First Kiss, Charlie Brown (where everyone continually and angrily blames Charlie Brown for his football team's loss, despite the fact that Lucy is not even trying to hide the fact that she is sabotaging him) got complaints from viewers. This is why some of the dialogue in that scene is distorted and unintelligible in later airings.
  • The Wacky World of Tex Avery was this for animator Andrew Gothicson and almost everyone else who worked on it.
  • Since the 2000s, Nickelodeon has tried very hard to hide the fact that KaBlam! exists, despite its cult following and legions of former '90s babies who remember seeing the show when it was fresh and new. However, this could have less to do with the quality of the show and more to do with nightmarish rights issues, since each cartoon segment is owned by someone different.
  • Lisa Ortiz has admitted that she finds it "disturbing" that people have actually heard of Ratatoing, let alone watch it and review it.
  • Jon McClenahan wasn't satisfied with the end product of The Jetsons Movie, he said it was the worst animated film he had ever seen and felt embarrassed to have his name in the credits.
    • Joe Barbera hated the film as well due to all the Executive Meddling, and replacing Janet Waldo with pop singer Tiffany as the voice of Judy Jetson. Strangely enough, William Hanna thought the film was okay.
    • The casting director Andrea Romano was also dismayed by the meddling that caused Janet Waldo to be let go and replaced, and requested that her name be removed from the credits so that she would not be blamed for it.
  • Nicole Jaffe, the original voice of Velma in the Scooby-Doo franchise, admits she only did the show because she needed the money, that she didn't enjoy voiceover (finding voice actors at the time to be "weird" people), and was losing interest in acting in general. She retired to pursue her (very successful) career of being a talent agent, and pretty much forgot about Scooby-Doo until singer Lauryn Hill told her how much she admired Velma. Afterwords, Jaffe began to appreciate her involvement in the series a bit more. She later came out of retirement to voice the character in 2002 for an additional two features, but says she doesn't think her performance was nearly as good as it had been 30+ years earlier, and is glad she doesn't have to voice the character anymore. However, she says she is open to appearing at fan conventions to sign autographs if invited.
  • Besides Maurice Lamarche (see above), many of the people who worked on Pinky, Elmyra & the Brain despised working on it. In fact, just the theme song's lyrics should be enough of an indication of their disgust.
    Theme Song: It's what the network wants/ Why bother to complain?
  • The Simpsons:
    • The old 15 second cartoon bumpers with The Simpsons for The Tracey Ullman Show have never been released on video or DVD, nor are they ever shown on TV. Matt Groening feels embarassed for them because it's so crudely drawn and the jokes are just simple, basic cartoony stuff.
    • The episode "The Principal and the Pauper" in which Skinner is proven to be someone under another name became an old shame after the episode was made. In the words of the makers themselves: "After it was finished we realized we made a mistake."
    • In the DVD commentary for the "Treehouse of Horror X" segment "Life's A Glitch, And Then You Die", the writers express regret over including Spike Lee and Al Sharpton (who are controversial black celebrities) among the doomed celebrities in a rocket ship headed towards the Sun. They also said that someone they would have preferred to be on that ship was George Steinbrenner.
    • The joke in "The City of New York vs. Homer Simpson" where two people are yelling at each other in the Twin Towers in New York: "They put all the jerks in Tower One" is an Old Shame for the makers of the episode, due to the 9/11 attacks (2001).
  • The Fairly OddParents creator Butch Hartman (as well as most of the crew) have apologized for the episode "It's a Wishful Life" due to the sadistic treatment of Timmy and its disturbing Family-Unfriendly Aesop.
  • Toei animator Junichi Hayama was embarrassed to have worked on Muppet Babies. He said he was a fan of the original The Muppet Show but didn't enjoy this incarnation.
  • Almost everyone who worked on Allen Gregory regrets it dearly. Even FOX is ashamed of it and removed it from every single site that was offering episodes for sale.
  • Craig Bartlett really detests making the infamous Hey Arnold! episode "Arnold Betrays Iggy". He even made the staff apologize for it.
  • The producers of Total Drama were not happy with the outcome of its fifth season All-Stars, having expressed regret for the very negative response it provoked.
  • Season 2 of Superjail is this for creators Christy Karacas and Stephen Warbrick. Karacas in particular wound up feeling shameful over how they spent too much time on character development and not enough on just making it weird. The fan backlash over the confirmation of Alice being a trans woman also helped seal its fate as Old Shame, causing Karacas to regret ever having her backstory shown.
  • Genndy Tartavosky was not impressed with The Justice Friends, feeling that it was short on character development and humor.
  • Cartoon Network appears to be going to great lengths to hide the fact that Whatever Happened to... Robot Jones? and Robotomy ever existed. Though the reasons why are a mystery, the former's title character reappeared for the networks 20th anniversary and the latter was on Netflix and had its shorts aired on Cartoon Planet. However, the same can't be said for Out of Jimmy's Head mentioned below.
  • 'My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic'':
    • Many of the higher-ups felt this way about "The Last Roundup." They folded to Moral Guardians by making a swift edit of Derpy Hooves into something less offensive, sparking flame wars all over the internet.
    • John de Lancie originally felt this way about playing Discord as the reason he did so was for the money. He had actually forgotten about it and it took the massive fan-mail he received to continue reprising the role.
    • "The Mysterious Mare Do-Well" was arguably the earliest and most enduring example of this for the series, having become infamous for its alleged Broken Aesop to the point where the creative team has rarely discussed it openly with fans.
  • PBS and the crew behind Arthur now seem to feel this way about the Season 12 episode "Room to Ride" and the Season 13 episode "The Great MacGrady," as both prominently feature former cycling champion Lance Armstrong as a guest celebrity (which has long been a norm for the series); in the wake of the doping scandal that saw Armstrong stripped of all of his Tour de France titles, both episodes have rarely been rerun on television as a result.
    • Made worse by the fact that the latter episode focuses on a major character in the series dealing with their struggles against cancer, which Lance Armstrong himself suffered and eventually overcame.
  • Planet Sheen seems to be this for Nickelodeon, after the show failed to resonate with fans of its predecessor Jimmy Neutron due to the shift in focus from Jimmy over to Sheen in the title role; it fared so poorly in the ratings that Nickelodeon often aired the episodes out of order before finally canceling it altogether.
  • Disney doesn't seem too keen on remembering Shorty McShorts' Shorts, which lasted barely a year and saw both its website and reruns pulled completely when its various pilots failed to captivate potential buyers or the viewers, with only one exception and on a completely different network.
  • Out of Jimmy's Head is this to Cartoon Network; the network's first real attempt at live-action programming combined with animation for a time reduced the studio to a laughingstock, emphasizing the network's traditional focus on cartoons and the inane premise of the series itself; after being critically ravaged by audiences, Cartoon Network canceled the series and pulled it and the movie that spawned it, Re-Animated from all the websites that made them available for viewing.
    • They attempted to salvage it in reruns by adding a Laugh Track to the episodes, but by that time, the damage had been done.
  • In addition to the many people who've worked on the film that share the same feelings, Threshold Entertainment Group doesn't seem to mention Foodfight! on their website.
  • Mike Judge has often expressed his hatred for the earliest Beavis And Butthead episodes, even going as far as canceling a DVD release, The History of Beavis and Butt-head, which contained most of these episodes.

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