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Nightmare Fuel: The Haunting Hour
  • The entirety of "Catching Cold": The young boy that mail man was talking about? He was the creepy old fat guy. He was trapped in the truck for over thirty years, waiting for someone as obsessed with ice cream as he was to take his place since the ice-cream truck "needs a soul" in order to survive. Imagine putting up with that demented ice-cream jingle for over thirty years.
  • In Alien Candy, the main character has one of his pinky toes bitten off and the ending is a rather nightmarish I Ate What?
  • In "Afraid of Clowns", the dream scene where the clown cuts off his hand, even though it was a dream and the hand looked like a cake when it was cut into.
    • And the end, in which the boy's family reveals that they're clowns and the whole circus act is his rite of passage into becoming a man. Usually in stories like "Vampire Breath," the kid accepts the fact and likes that he'll be a vampire when he hits puberty, but in this story, the boy is cuolrophobic and absolutely hates the idea of becoming what he fears most.
  • How about "Scary Mary"? Mary in the mirror, the masks, The Faceless Girls and Scary Mary's face were all terrifying. There's also something very disturbing about being so obsessed with beauty that you're oblivious to burning to death.
  • At the end of "Brush With Madness" it's revealed that the entire episode was a comic written by an eccentric graphic novelist named Allan Miller who was upset over having an obsessive fan, so he decided to get rid of him — and the fan's friend who didn't do anything to Allan Miller (and even tried to convince her comic book geek friend to return the brushes) — by having the work run through a paper shredder.
  • "Sick": The idea of a little boy trapped with an unseen Eldritch Abomination, and the government being willing to sacrifice him and gas his whole house just to kill it. And the final scene where the boy wakes up and thinks it was All Just a Dream... Until the morning-news show hosts come back suddenly on TV (again) and tell him that—nope, this is not a dream and the government really is gonna explode his whole house and everyone in it. The last thing the boy sees and hears before getting killed is a bright white light and a loud flat-line noise.
  • "Mascot", which has Willie trying to get rid of the school's old mascot Big Yellow, and somewhere down the line wonders who's under the costume. There's no one under the costume, because the costume is alive and also eats Willie. It also appears that the people either don't die or at least aren't digested immediately after they're eaten.
  • "Scarecrow" has the most messed up ending ever (next to the twist endings for "Uncle Howee" and "The Girl in the Painting"), in which a scarecrow — who turns out to be the man who sold the scarecrow to Jenny and her brother — rids the world of everyone and everything in the world, except for Jenny's brother. The scarecrow man tells Jenny's brother that he was spared so that way he can join him in watching the world come to an end. In the original ending, the brother sets fire to the scarecrow and walks away. In an alternate ending, the brother is turned into a scarecrow.
  • "The Perfect Brother" Matt and Josh are brothers, very nice brothers — but Matt seems too perfect and their parents are always complaining about their grades and not being perfect. Josh sees Matt's legs 'taken away' by the facility as he's a non-functioning robot. He escapes from the robot facility and the staff take a protesting Josh home to his own parents. It soon turns out that Josh is the only human in their family and that his friend was fake. It isn't long before Josh's robotic parents declare him defective and 'just an experiment' as they toss him in a crate (presumably headed to the same facility).
  • "The Cast": Take your pick: A revelation that the Cat-Lady cursed Lex into making his cast into a rats' nest for her pet cats, Lex later sawing his own cast off- and, his arm, according to paramedics- just to get the cast off, the rats afterwards appearing in the ambulance, or the fact that, even though Lex confessed that he was the one who threw eggs at the cat lady's house, he'll be haunted by those rats.
  • "Red Eye": A little girl named Georgia has been getting pictures from her father who's doing work abroad. Eventually, a shadowy, demonic figure called an Alp begins appearing in the background of each photo, steadily getting closer (and closer) to her father. As Georgia gets more and more scared, and her mother refuses to listen to her concerns, she's worried that the monster followed her father home. The truth, revealed in the last second of the episode is far worse.
    Georgia's Dad: Daddy's not here.
    • What's worse, that's final scene of this episode. The screen blacks out as we hear Georgia's screams.
  • The Bigger Bad in Girl in the Painting; it's a dragon — or some kind of reptilian creature — that basically holds the girl and her mother hostage, and they have to lure people from the real world in so they can feed the beast and not end up as dinner themselves.
  • "Checking Out": A family on vacation stop by this really fancy hotel run by a cult that brainwashes parents into forgetting that they have children and sacrifice the children by tossing them into a room with a white void in it hidden behind a large painting of the hotel's founder. The story itself is a more twisted version of the first episode of The Nightmare Room episode "Don't Forget Me." The good news is: the family came out alive and defeated the cult. The bad news: all of the kids who have been sacrificed in years' past pretty much died with the hotel.
  • The Director's Cut of Spaceman. Whereas Aaron was sympathetic to the woman trying to cling to the memories of her deceased, space-loving son in the original version, the Director's Cut had him realize that the woman was insane, but before he can do anything about it, she locks him in with her son's corpse and Aaron is forced to play "Spaceman" with the dead boy forever.
  • "Terrible Love": Brendon's breakdown when Maggie confesses that Cupid hit him with two love arrows (which Cupid ethically can't do, as the chemicals in the love arrows drive whoever's been hit into a love-induced insanity, but does anyway because he's a god and he's bound by ancient law to do whatever mortals say, even if it means their downfall) and that it's driving him crazy.
  • "Funhouse": A kid whose father left him finds an outlet for his rage by smashing a model replica of an arguing family in a traveling funhouse, which makes him addicted to violence. What's really scary about this one is that, much like the episode "Headshot," the real horror comes from the protagonist's inner demons (in this case, it's Chad not expressing his anger over his broken family, then expressing it through violence and literally becoming a monster from it).
  • From Dead Bodies - Jake Skinner, you belong to me now!!
    • Also Jake's attempts on Anna's life. If not scary enough, the way he talks comes off as a rape vibe.
    Come on babe, I just need you to do one thing for me.
    • The curse the Grim Reaper puts on Jake, causes him to decompose. During the climax, half his face is rotted away.
  • From Uncle Howee, Uncle Howee transforms Jared into a full body marionette who is introduced as a "new friend" on the show, all while Cynthia, his sister, giggles at the new edition to her favorite TV show. Consider the Adult Fear of the mother—who was just gone to do work and has no idea what was happening at the time—it makes you wonder the full extent of Uncle Howee's powers.
    • The fact that we don't know who or what Uncle Howee is (a demon, a Reality Warper, a living cartoon character, the ghost of a long-dead children's entertainer whose spirit lives on because his show has been rerunning for years and the love and devotion of kids who watch his show keep his spirit alive, or an ordinary human with extraordinary powers are the most common conclusions to draw). All we know is that he has omnipotent powers, can interact with viewers, can slip between the TV world and the real world, can appear in many places at once, and turn people into characters that would be at home on his show.
  • The end of "My Old House," which is in the same vein as "The Girl in the Painting" and "Uncle Howee" in that the main character gets sucked into another dimension and will never escape. In this episode, the house comes to life and sucks Alice inside of it when she realizes that she shouldn't have left her family in favor of the house...and now she lives forever as an imprint on the wall, which is discovered by a girl moving into the house.

HannibalNightmareFuel/Live-Action TVHaven

alternative title(s): The Haunting Hour The Series
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