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Music: Blondie
One way or another I'm gonna find ya,
I'm gonna getcha getcha getcha getcha

Blondie is an American rock band that formed in 1974-1975, first gained fame in the late 1970s and has so far sold over 60 million records. The band was a pioneer in the early American New Wave and Punk Rock scenes. Its first two albums contained strong elements of these genres, and although successful in the United Kingdom and Australia, Blondie was regarded as an underground band in the United States until the release of Parallel Lines in 1978. Over the next three years, the band achieved several hit singles and was noted for its eclectic mix of musical styles incorporating elements of Disco, Pop and Reggae, while retaining a basic style as a New Wave band.

Lead singer Deborah Harry achieved a level of celebrity that eclipsed other band members, leading to tension within the group. Following the poorly received album The Hunter and with core member Chris Stein diagnosed with a potentially fatal disease, the group disbanded in 1982. As members pursued other projects, Blondie's reputation grew over the following decade and the group reformed in 1997, achieving renewed success and a number one single in the United Kingdom with "Maria" in 1999. The group toured and performed throughout the world over the following years, and was inducted into both the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and the RockWalk of Fame in 2006.

Blondie songs:

Album discography:
  • Blondie (1976)
  • Plastic Letters (1978)
  • Parallel Lines (1978)
  • Eat to the Beat (1979)
  • Autoamerican (1980)
  • The Hunter (1982)
  • No Exit (1999)
  • The Curse of Blondie (2003)
  • Panic of Girls (2011)

"Tropes of Glass":

  • Artifact Title: The band name references the fact that they had two blonde backing singers in addition to Debbie Harry. Neither of them stayed long enough to perform live or record with them. Therefore, for the record, the name has nothing to do with Hitler.
  • '80s Hair: Debbie Harry on the cover of The Hunter.
  • The Cover Changes The Gender: "Denise" became "Denis".
  • Disco: "Heart of Glass"
  • Genre Roulette: Blondie are well known for this, spanning several different genres across each album. A good example is Eat To The Beat's second half (Side 2 on the original vinyl/cassette release) which has each track in a distinct genre:
    • Die Young Stay Pretty - Reggae
    • Slow Motion - Motown
    • Atomic - Disco
    • Sound A Sleep - Easy Listening
    • Victor - Progressive Rock
    • Living In The Real World - Punk
  • Gratuitous French: "Sunday Girl", which also has its own French version. The version on The Best Of Blondie was a mix made from both and is well known.
    • "Denis" also featured a verse in French, which explained the cover's name and gender change (from a girl named Denise to a French boy named Denis).
    • "Francois, c'est pas flashe non due" in the Rapture rap.
    • From Call Me: "Appelle-moi, mon chéri, appelle-moi", just after some Gratuitous Italian: "Amore chiamami, chiamami". Both verses mean "Call me, my dear/love".
      • Debbie's solo song "French Kissin' In The USA" also has Gratuitous French in the repeated line "Embrasser c'est Francais". Like "Sunday Girl", it also has its own French version, which was the B-Side to the single "In Love With Love".
  • Obsession Song: Several, including "One Way or Another", "Accidents Never Happen" and "Hangin' On the Telephone".
  • One Man Song: Denis.
  • Performance Video
  • Playboy Bunny: Debbie Harry worked at New York's Playboy Club back in the '70s.
  • Pun-Based Title: "Rapture"
  • Rap Rock: Trope Maker ("Rapture") along with The Clash ("The Magnificent Seven") and the crossover between Run-D.M.C. and Aerosmith ("Walk This Way").
  • Rearrange the Song: The band's early song Once I Had A Love was rearranged several times until it became Heart Of Glass several years later. When first written the song was blues inspired, it went on to become more upbeat and poppier, and finally the band decided on the electro-disco arrangement that made "Heart Of Glass" famous. Several demos of it are available and show the song in its various stages of development.
    • A similar case for "Just Go Away" which was once a 1975 song called "Lullaby" with different lyrics. Although not recorded or played live "Fade Away And Radiate" was one of the first songs the band wrote. The band were somewhat short of material for Parallel Lines, and hadn't been considering these songs for an album, but producer Mike Chapman liked them.
  • Shout-Out: "Dreaming" makes one to Bob Dylan's song "Watching the River Flow."
  • Small Name, Big Ego: The titular "her" in "Rip Her To Shreds".

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