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Music: Blake Shelton
Born 1976 in Oklahoma, Blake Shelton is one of the leading males in 21st century country music.

Shelton launched his career in 2001 with the single "Austin" on Giant Records. Although the label quickly closed, the song's fate was unharmed, as parent company Warner Bros. Records quickly picked up the song and pushed it to a five-week stay at number 1. Second album The Dreamer included another number 1 in "The Baby", but the other two singles did not fare as well. He quickly bounced back with the cheeky "Some Beach" in 2004, and saved the flagging Pure BS album with a re-release that included a cover of Michael Bublé's "Home". Startin' Fires also included the chart-topper "She Wouldn't Be Gone".

In 2010, Shelton chose to release two extended plays a year. These included Hillbilly Bone and All About Tonight, the title tracks of which were among his many number ones. Since these did not sell well, he returned to a full album in 2011 with Red River Blue, and Based on a True Story... in 2013. Shelton has been paired with producer Scott Hendricks since Hillbilly Bone, and has maintained an uninterrupted streak of #1 country hits.

Shelton has been married to fellow singer Miranda Lambert since 2010. He is also a vocal coach on the musical competition The Voice.

Albums:

  • Blake Shelton (2001)
  • The Dreamer (2003)
  • Blake Shelton's Barn & Grill (2004)
  • Pure BS (2007)
  • Startin' Fires (2008)
  • Hillbilly Bone (2010). His first "Six Pak" EP.
  • All About Tonight (2010). Second and final EP.
  • Red River Blue (2011)
  • Based on a True Story… (2013)

Tropes present:

Named after animal: his song "honeybee"
  • Advertised Extra: His 2014 single "My Eyes", which credits the almost completely unnoticeable backing vocals from The Voice contestant Gwen Sebastian.
  • Bowdlerize: "Drink on It" changes "Man, he sounds like such a prick" to "Man, I'd like to bust his lip" for the radio edit.
    • Similarly, "don't take no shit" became "…no lip" on the radio edit of "Boys 'Round Here".
  • Country Rap: "Boys 'Round Here" uses mainly spoken-word verses.
  • Dual Meaning Chorus: "When Somebody Knows You That Well" has a man trying to hide various things from others (trying to hide intoxication from his dad, sadness from his wife, and his bad nature from God) before realizing that he can't, since those figures all know him so well.
  • Early-Bird Cameo: A then-unknown Rachel Proctor (co-writer of Martina McBride's "Where Would You Be" and a few songs by Jessica Simpson and Jennette McCurdy; also had a Top 20 hit in 2004 with "Me and Emily") sang backing vocals on "Ol' Red".
  • '80s Hair: He had a mullet through the second album.
  • Getting Crap Past the Radar: "Some Beach" (say it out loud). There's also his album Pure BS, which doubles as a Stealth Pun on his initials.
  • Intercourse with You: "My Eyes" ("…are the only thing I don't want to take off of you").
  • Last Chorus Slow Down: "Playboys of the Southwestern World", but for only half of the last chorus.
  • Love Will Lead You Back: Performed via answering machine on "Austin".
  • Massive Multiplayer Crossover: "Boys 'Round Here" has backing vocals from two of the writers (Thomas Rhett and Dallas Davidson), the producer (Scott Hendricks), the Pistol Annies (a group comprising Miranda Lambert, Ashley Monroe, and Angaleena Presley), and RaeLynn, a contestant on The Voice.
  • Murder Ballad: Interestingly, a murder is implied but never elaborated on in "Ol' Red".
  • Not So Different: "We all got a hillbilly bone down deep inside…"
  • Power Ballad: "Over" has the huge, soaring chorus, rock guitar and swelling string sections of one.
  • Shaped Like Itself: "The More I Drink" has "The more I drink, the more I drink."
  • Take That, Critics!: His initial response to ongoing criticism by classic country music artists and their supporters about the state of current country music, which stated bluntly that today's fans aren't interested in "their grandpa’s music" (i.e. music by classic artists, including songs recorded years ago) and claimed the critics were "old farts." One of those "old farts" – Ray Price, a legendary singer known equally for his 4/4-shuffle and more pop-oriented Nashville Sound – fired back with his own "Take That, Critics" statement, "This guy sounds like in his own mind that his head is so large no hat ever made will fit him" (along with other comments that spoke about the short-lived careers of several performers who cater to younger audiences without an attempt to draw older fans).
  • Uncommon Time: "Mine Would Be You" is in 7/4 on the verses.

Kenny RogersCountry MusicThe Statler Brothers
Sex PistolsCreator/Warner Bros. RecordsAllan Sherman

alternative title(s): Blake Shelton
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