Examples of MisaimedFandom in ComicBooks.

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* Satirical depictions of politicians are almost inevitably popular with their targets (with the notable exception of [[http://www.guardian.co.uk/cartoons/stevebell/0,7371,802577,00.html Steve Bell's take on former British Prime Minister]] UsefulNotes/JohnMajor.) Often, they will contact the cartoonist, or the paper it was published in, to ask for a copy or the original, probably thinking it's better if people are making fun of them than just ignoring them. Ralph Steadman declared he would only depict politician's arses to prevent this.
** [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Supermac_%28cartoon%29 Super-Mac]] by Victor Weisz, a parody of UsefulNotes/HaroldMacmillan, was especially so. Maybe he shouldn't have compared him to a ''superhero''.
** Controversial British politician Enoch Powell, well known for his anti-immigrational "Rivers Of Blood" speech, owned a lot of cartoons starring himself and had them framed at the wall. But this was mostly done by his wife. In the BBC documentary "Enoch Powell: Odd Man Out" Powell even expressed feeling embarrassed by some of this cartoons, but his wife very staunchly defended him on the matter. Many of this drawings were critical of his ideas, but the couple didn't seem to grasp this.
** ''ComicBook/{{Superdupont}}'' by Jacques Lob and Creator/{{Gotlib}} (and also Alexis and Jean Solé) is a French comic parodying the superhero genre ''and'' a satire of French jingoism. The title character is an over-the-top stereotypical FrenchJerk with ''Superman''-like powers (which he loses when he hears the French anthem played in reverse) and battles "Anti-France", a shadowy group of people who all speak with a mix of all foreign accents at once and target French core values -- such as replacing French wine with Italian wine and mass-producing berets made in China. The French extreme right-wing nationalist party Le Front National took Superdupont as their icon, which caused the authors of the comic to put it on hiatus for a few years. French far right politician Jean-Marie [=LePen=]'s approval was the main reason for the creators to do this.
* ''ComicBook/{{Asterix}}'': Quite some European far-right politicians or supporters have used this series promote a romanticized idea of ancient Europe in a time when supposedly no immigrants crowded the country. It doesn't occur to them that ''Asterix'' is more historical fiction than anything else and that Asterix and his friends always get along fine with other nationalities. Even the Romans aren't always depicted as villains.
* In the infamous ''ComicBook/ChickTracts'', readers are ''supposed'' to agree with everything the protagonists say, but there is a significant "fandom" that finds the over-the-top nature [[{{Narm}} unintentionally hilarious]]. In addition, on first reading them, many people assume that they are intended as a parody. [[PoesLaw They are serious.]] The sheer number of times he has [[StrawCharacter Straw Secularists/Liberals]] (especially in schools), such as the dystopia in "Last Generation" which has the security and language of [[Literature/NineteenEightyFour Oceania]], the religious politics of ''Literature/LeftBehind'', and the social politics of Straw Liberal states, with a touch of "concentration camps" for parents who discipline their children -- it makes it difficult for one to accept them as serious arguments unless one realizes that [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fred_Phelps there are more extreme people out there]].
* This happened to [[Creator/RobertCrumb R. Crumb]] ''a lot'' -- most notably with his iconic "Keep On Truckin'" character/pose, which was adopted by many rock-loving hippies as their "mascot," as it were. The truth was, Crumb was ''making fun'' of rock music lovers, who in his eyes were doing "The Dance of Cultural Death" (as he put it). He even explained it in a comic in The R. Crumb Coffee Table Art Book and told his (probably now disillusioned) hippie fans: "KEEP ON TRUCKIN', SCHMUCKS!". (This was followed by Mr. Natural remarking: "Don't forget, Bob, that it was the compassion, the loving forgiveness, that they found so appealing in your cartoons, that made you so popular, that got you laid, that earned you a living. Keep it in mind!")
** Crumb has also draw quite some controversial comics in his life. His Angelfood [=McSpade=] comics about a stereotypical African tribeswoman and the highly controversial two-parter comic strip "When the Goddamn Niggers Take Over America" and "When the Goddamn Jews take over America" have understandably been accused of racism, the latter two predictably being used by Neo Nazi's and far-right supporters. Crumb himself was absolutely horrified by this, because all his comics are meant as {{Satire}}. He is also huge admirer of {{Jazz}} and {{Blues}} and drew many comic strips and album covers promoting his love for these Afro-American musical genres. Crumb also has many black and Jewish friends, including Creator/ArtSpiegelman, and is married to a Jewish woman, Aline Kominsky-Crumb.
* ''ComicBook/TheDarkKnightReturns'' has an in-universe example: The Sons of the Batman, a group of vigilantes inspired by Batman using incredibly violent methods against mostly petty criminals (ie, stopping a three card monte game with napalm, pumping a couple shotgun shells into a shoplifter[[note]]And cutting off the fingers of the poor clerk, for not defending the store.[[/note]]). Needless to say, when Batman finally meets them, he sets them straight.
* In recent years, Comicbook/ThePunisher has become very popular with members of the American armed forces, especially due to the influence of ''Film/AmericanSniper''. This has proven very aggravating for Gerry Conway, who was a conscientious objector during UsefulNotes/TheVietnamWar and intended for the Punisher to be a ''bad guy''.
** A lot of the unintended heroism of the character stems from the writers not really understanding their own context. A murdering vigilante in real life is unambiguously a bad thing, but in a world where even the heroes rack up body counts in the dozens or hundreds per year, the villains are worse, and the only punishment you get for burning a hundred people to death is a month of brooding from Batman and six weeks in a revolving-door prison, being the one guy at least attempting to solve problems permanently gives you a lot more social utility than murdering criminals would in the real world.
* SelfDemonstrating/TheJoker - mass-murderer, torturer, MonsterClown, and has a MASSIVE fanbase.
** This goes for many popular monstrous characters: there is a difference between enjoying the character's appearance in the story (which, one must imagine, the creator wants you to do unless stated otherwise), and the kinds of interactions they bring, and seeing their crimes and psychopathy as something to be cheered on and supported or thinking the villain might be a cool dude to know, which is the main idea of this trope.
** This actually gives rise to an in-universe example. In ''ComicBook/BatmanChildOfDreams'' the Batman must go up against a series of imposters of his rogues gallery, created by a MadScientist out of self described "pathetic losers." Where does he find these people? Answer: the INTERNET. It seems that Batman never noticed that the years had given rise to Joker Appreciation Societies and Riddler Fanclubs...
** A better example from the pages of Batman might be Comicbook/HarleyQuinn. Although she is the girlfriend and accomplice of SelfDemonstrating/TheJoker, and is often shown to be almost as AxeCrazy as he is, fans often seem to forgive her actions, hold her up as something of a heroic or anti-heroic figure, and she is often a KarmaHoudini in the actual stories.
*** Her relationship with the Joker is also very prone to this. The tragedy of her love for him is that she thinks he's a decent person on the inside and she can redeem him by making him love her back, but that's simply not true. He's a coldhearted psychopath and he will always be one, and he views her as nothing more than a tool to manipulate. Basically, DracoInLeatherPants as reality. However, Harley also happens to be living out the fantasy of an unfortunately large subset of female comic readers, who tend to take her side.
* ''ComicBook/{{Batman}}'' in general isn't necessarily immune to this. Mark Waid's Justice League story ''Tower of Babel'' was designed to criticize the character's prep time paranoia tendencies by [[spoiler:showing that he'd secretly been thinking up ways to kill or incapacitate his Justice League allies for years, only to have them fall into the wrong hands, thus placing the entire world in jeopardy]], but unfortunately all some fans came away with was "BATMAN'S THE SMARTEST, MOST BAD ASS HERO EVER!!!"
** The emergence of comics like {{Irredeemable}}, with its BewareTheSuperman concept, also tends to put Batman in a better light in this storyline, given just how dangerous a lot of heroes could be if they really wanted to be.
* ''ComicBook/JudgeDredd''. You'd be surprised how many people find the idea of the [[PoliceState Judge system]] appealing and miss the strip's satire altogether.
* ''ComicBook/KingdomCome'': Some people read it just because they like the [[NinetiesAntiHero Antiheroes]]. This is missing the fact that ''ComicBook/KingdomCome'' was written as a criticism of that kind of character. Others miss the idea that a big part of the story is that Superman and the new League trying to bring about world peace works horribly [[spoiler:and ends up getting everyone nuked,]] and wholeheartedly support/condemn them as [[UsefulNotes/TheSilverAgeOfComicBooks Silver Age]] nostalgia.
** Some of that has to do with the concepts that Waid and Ross came up with being popular enough with writers that [[{{Retcanon}} they were made]] [[CanonImmigrant canon]]. A few characters like Irey West, Jakeem Thunder and the female Judomaster ended up crossing over into the DCU, while Comicbook/{{Cyborg}} temporarily got his golden skin and Roy Harper became Red Arrow. Seeing as how those characters were generally not shown to be outright asses though, it's somewhat understandable.
** It got to the point that Magog, who existed exclusively as a self-righteous TakeThat aimed at 90's antiheroes (ComicBook/{{Cable}} in particularly), was given his own book that played his over-the-top attempts at badassery straight. The title itself was cancelled pretty quickly and Magog ended up being killed off shortly after it ended.
*** Magog even got Misaimed Fandom ''from his creators.'' Waid and Ross tried to design his costume to include everything they hated about 1990s costumes, but ended up kinda liking it. The character also gets a clear shot at redemption.
** This attitude began even during the series' original publication. Both Waid and Ross were astounded that in the reaction of readers to the first issue, just about no fan understood that Superman's return was not a symbol of hope and things getting fixed but that Armageddon was on its way.
* Though the series was a massively controversial, there were a surprising number of readers of ''Comicbook/SuperiorSpiderMan'' who sided with Comicbook/DoctorOctopus and genuinely felt that he was indeed better at being Spider-Man than Peter Parker ever was. This is despite the series' final arc demonstrating in great detail ''why'' Ock's pompous, DarkerAndEdgier methods did not work, and even climaxing with him willingly relinquishing control and admitting that Peter was indeed the [[TitleDrop superior Spider-Man]] all along.
* ''ComicBook/LexLuthorManOfSteel'' is taken by some as an excellent argument for why ComicBook/LexLuthor is a hero, or at least believing that it brings up some intriguing GrayAndGreyMorality and humanistic traits to the character because he honestly thinks that he is a hero and Superman is a villain. Many also agree with Lex's arguments against Superman's LawfulGood ChronicHeroSyndrome, which sees him rescuing Toyman from an angry mob, in this story a [[KickTheSonOfABitch pedophile who had just (seemingly) blown up a daycare centre.]] Except for the fact that it is ''strongly, strongly'' implied that ''Lex himself'' blew up that centre, and is behind a bunch of other horrible things in the comic, and the real point of the story is that Lex is deluded and insane to boot.
* Lobo started as a generic mercenary before being retooled by creator Keith Giffen as a parody of eighties "grim and gritty" heroes like ComicBook/{{Wolverine}} and ComicBook/ThePunisher in a series of mini-series books. Needless to say, Lobo became a big hit with fans who took the satire at face value.
* This happens with a lot of "satire" characters where the author "exaggerates" them just by taking all the elements that people seem to like in other shows and lumping them together without actually exaggerating anything. We've seen this in reverse with films like ''Film/SuckerPunch'', intended to "parody" exploitation literature but garnering reactions as if they were genuine because, well, the creators forgot the part where they make the thing they're parodying more ridiculous or extreme than the source material.
* German comic ''ComicStrip/NickKnatterton'' was made as this, since author Manfred Schmidt considered comics a primitive art form. The fans took it straight and liked it.
* ''ComicBook/OneHundredBullets'': Creator/BrianAzzarello was surprised and disturbed to find that the violent, amoral homicidal rapist and torturer Lono had a devoted fan following.
* ''Franchise/TeenageMutantNinjaTurtles'' is a more innocent example than most, but the rapid transformation into the sort of MerchandiseDriven juggernaut it was originally meant to parody had a lot to do with this. The creators and later licensees seem to have decided to run with the misaimed version instead of trying to fight it. That fandom mostly came from the TV series, which was entirely intended as such, so it's not so much Misaimed Fandom as it is ExecutiveMeddling that took. [[TropesAreNotBad The franchise has become pretty popular since becoming a franchise too]].
* Creator/JhonenVasquez repeatedly takes pages out of his ''ComicBook/JohnnyTheHomicidalManiac'' and ''Squee'' series to TakeThat to various people he feels are enjoying his comic for the wrong reasons. One extended story in ''ComicBook/JohnnyTheHomicidalManiac'' is about a serial-killing fanboy of Johnny's. Since Johnny is a character who goes around murdering the most annoying people in the typical Vasquez CrapsackWorld, it's not hard to see why some people might get the wrong idea.
** Goths seem to treat Jhonen as their king, despite him constantly insulting them and his own hatred of the association. With that said, he doesn't necessarily hate Goths, but he doesn't care for catering specifically to them.
* V from ''ComicBook/VForVendetta'', to the point where the live action adaptation made it so that he was obviously meant to be the hero. V is a fanatical terrorist whose main motives are revenge and his methods include physical and psychological torture (of both enemies ''and allies''), bombing of public monuments, and brutal murder. An argument can be made for a case of ALighterShadeOfGrey, given that V is also a charming and charismatic NobleDemon and his enemies are a brutal, genocidal and largely irredeemable fascist regime, but V was intended to be a lot more ambiguous than many ultimately view him as being.
** ''ComicBook/VForVendetta'', particularly the movie, spread the misconception that Guy Fawkes Day honors Guy Fawkes, the plucky rebel, instead of celebrating the fact that ''England narrowly averted a terrorist attack on the capital.'' It's like thinking [[TheWarOnTerror September 11th]] honors Osama Bin Laden.
* In ''Comicbook/{{Watchmen}}'', an '80s superhero deconstruction, Creator/AlanMoore heavily based the character Rorschach on Steve Ditko's Objectivist superheroes, specifically The Question and Mr. A. However, Moore had no affinity for their ideology, calling Mr. A "an absolute insane fascist" and Objectivism "laughable," and he wrote Rorschach as his own take on what an Objectivist hero would probably be like, a short, ugly, murderous sociopath. Despite this, readers saw Rorschach's uncompromising persona as endearing, and he became the most popular character of a landmark comic series. Additionally, as pointed out on the UnbuiltTrope page, Rorschach and the Comedian were intended to deconstruct the NinetiesAntiHero, and ended up popularizing it instead. Apparently, the series's beginning with the horrific death of the Comedian and ending with [[spoiler:the even more horrific death of Rorschach]] wasn't enough to make people realize that ''these were not admirable characters''.
* Xavin has a huge following among ''ComicBook/{{Runaways}}''' LGBT fandom because of their perceived transgender or genderfluid identity, despite the fact that even under Creator/BrianKVaughan's pen, the series presents Xavin as an arrogant, controlling asshole who emotionally blackmails Karolina into an arranged marriage, inadvertently reignites a war that wiped out most of Karolina's people, and treats Karolina and her friends in a condescending manner.
* UsefulNotes/TheBechdelTest (which originated in a comic) was conceived as a deliberately easy-to-pass test (passing merely required that a work have more than one female character, that the female characters have a conversation, and that this conversation not revolve around men) in order to demonstrate just how little effort movie directors and screenwriters put into developing female characters, but has since been co-opted by others as an all-purpose feminist-credentials test.
-->'''Dane Cook:''' ''"Always remember that the lyric 'Oh my God, Becky... look at her butt!' from Sir Mix-a-Lot's 'I like Big Butts' passes the Bechdel Test, folks. Always remember that."''
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