Make Me Wanna Shout / Real Life

  • As was demonstrated on MythBusters, supersonic aircraft can rattle windows and, in certain circumstances, shatter the glass. There's also the risk of eardrum damage.
    • This is referenced in an episode of Garfield and Friends: Jon reads about the sonic boom, calls Garfield for lunch... and the cat arrives at the speed needed for it to occur and start destroying the kitchen.
    • The Republic XF-84H test plane had a propeller whose blades turned at supersonic speed. The result was a continuous sonic boom that could damage other aircraft, and was directly responsible for inducing a seizure in an unfortunate ground personnel.
  • The Other Wiki talks about Operation Bongo II over Oklahoma City which led to the US halting SST development.
  • Tigers use their partly-subsonic roar to stun and drive off rival tigers.
  • Those Wacky Nazis tried to develop an explosive-driven sonic "Wunderwaffe" that could knock down planes. It actually worked, producing waves of sound which were highly destructive — within a range of about a dozen yards. Zurück zum Zeichenbrett!translation 
  • It was hypothesized that Sperm Whales used intense beams of sound to stun their prey.
  • Pistol shrimp used their claws to form a cavitation bubble that then explodes and stuns or kills their prey with a shockwave.
  • Dynamite fishing — illegal in most places — uses this trope. The shockwaves from a dynamite explosion can be much stronger under water, and will stun all fish in the vicinity.
  • If a pursuing predator catches up to a chicken, the chicken can escape by slapping its wings against its own body. The resulting thunderclap will only disorient its pursuer for a second or two, but that can buy it enough time to get away.
  • Not quite as impressive as some of these, but Welsh singer Tom Jones has been known to break microphones with the sheer power of his voice.
  • When frightened, a pig's squeal can reach 115 decibels. (For comparison, a jet engine at the distance of 100 m is about 110 to 140 dB.) Something to consider before you play pranks on a farm.
  • The bow-mounted low frequency sonars mounted on submarines and larger surface ships have to be powerful enough to bounce a signal off a target at a range of dozens of nautical miles. Said sonars are appropriately powerful (especially since sound follows the inverse-square law), and the most powerful ones can apocryphally boil the water right next to the emitters. There are plenty of reports of whales being caught in a sonar beam and dying from multiple internal organs rupturing.
  • The sound a sonorousnote  object, for example a wine glass, makes is what's known as its "resonance frequency". It's essentially a sound which it makes when it vibrates (e.g. by dampening your fingertip and running it around the edge of the glass) with the sound being louder the more it vibrates. Conversely the same sound will make the object vibrate. This means that if you play back an object's resonance frequency loudly enough you can quite easily make it vibrate enough to shatter through sound alone, particularly with brittle materials like glass.
    • And The MythBusters tested this one too. Professional sound equipment can handle the feat easily, an average person can do it with an amp and some consistency, and using the proper technique a human being can shatter a wine glass with just their voice.
  • The Chrysler horn (not to be confused with the horn on board Chrysler cars) is a nuclear air raid siren run off of a souped up v8 engine that's designed to warn an entire city from well outside city limits. When cranked up to max volume, these sirens have started fires, broken glass, killed animals, and cause material fatigue to nearby buildings and equipment. The fact that it could start fires with its sound couldn't even be confirmed for almost fifty years, because the sound alone broke the instrumentation needed to confirm this hypothesis (many tried to explain the random grass fires as the siren spewing gasoline due to internal mechanical failures). It can do these things because it has such a large wave amplitude that when the sound collides with an object, it causes a massive vibrations similar to an object at its resonance frequency (only with the Chrysler horn no resonance frequency is needed). These vibrations are then displaced as heat and cause material fatigue, causing stuff to break over time.
  • Long Range Acoustic Device weapon can send painful sound waves.
  • 200 decibels can rupture your lungs. Luckily, you literally need a nuke, or copious amounts of Stuff Blowing Up at least, to get that kind of noise. The decibel scale is logarithmic; put simply, to register 10 more decibels requires ten times the power. To compare, a rifle shot generates about 150dB at point blank. A 200dB sound requires 100,000 times more power, and because of the rapid drop-off only applies at the source. In general, that kind of pressure wave (which is the "loudness" part of the sound) is less a sound, and more of an explosion, and even then anything higher than 190 is hard to achieve because our particular atmosphere doesn't really assist much.
    • And then there's Krakatoa. 172 decibels 100 miles away from the source.

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/MakeMeWannaShout/RealLIfe