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Vulcan Has No Moon
Space is big. Space is very, very big. Because space is big, objects are usually very far apart. But empty skies and vast lanes of the void of space are not aesthetically pleasing. This trope is in effect when objects in space are visible in locations where they make no sense, either due to the science or due to pre-established canon. Nebulae are particularly subject to this, because they can fill an otherwise black sky with color.

Related Tropes: Asteroid Thicket, Sci-Fi Writers Have No Sense of Scale, Science Marches On (for some examples base on older information). The Mountains of Illinois is a similar Earth-bound trope. Subtrope of Space Does Not Work That Way.

Examples:

Anime
  • In Robotech/Macross, the Zentradi destroy an object after the SDF-1 leaves Mars orbit but before reaching Earth. Even though there aren't even asteroids between Earth and Mars in regular orbits the object is very clearly spherical making it at the very least a Dwarf Planet (and those have certainly all been accounted for). In the dub Lisa refers to it as the planet Palomir.

Comic Books

Film
  • Trope Namer is an early episode of Star Trek in which Spock tells Uhura the trope name in response to her flirting. In contrast, Star Trek: The Motion Picture shows a massive "moon" in the sky. The Re Cut of Star Trek: The Motion Picture removed the moon specifically to fix this problem.
  • In the 2009 reboot, apparently Delta Vega is close enough for Spock Prime to witness the destruction of Vulcan without a telescope. This ends up Handwaved as a psychic vision.
  • In John Carter, Mars's moons are shown as two huge spheres in the sky that are always right next to each other. In reality, Mars's moons are extremely tiny, non-spherical (they're captured asteroids, and look rather like potatoes), and their orbital rates are so different — 2.7 days east-to-west for Deimos, 11 hours west-to-east for Phobos — they don't stay lined up together in the sky.

Video Games
  • World of Warcraft: When standing on the peak of the Black Temple on Outland, while within the raid, Azeroth is clearly visible in the sky. Most notably, the Maelstrom - a gigantic, ever-spinning, logic- and physics-defying whirlpool - is the most obvious landmark. Outland is by no means visible from the other planet.
    • Likewise, for quite a long time, one of Azeroth's two moons was missing. They seem to have brought it back in either Cataclysm or Mists of Pandaria.
  • In Spore, every planet in the star system you're currently in is visible (and quite large) from the ground of any other planet. It's even possible to see entire galaxies from the ground, looking so close you should be able to reach them with the Faster-Than-Light Travel the game allows for. Then again, the planets and stars in Spore are much smaller than real ones, so perhaps the whole universe itself is smaller than in reality and those planets and galaxies really are that close to one another.

Western Animation
  • Futurama tends to show Mars with Earth clearly visible in the sky, and oversized moons. This is presumably Rule of Cool, as the creators would definitely know better. On the other hand, due to the use of Stock Footage, the Earth is shown rotating in the correct direction even after its rotation was reversed.

Unrealistic Black HoleSpace Does Not Work That WayWeird Moon
Uranus Is ShowingTropes in SpaceWagon Train to the Stars
Total Eclipse of the PlotIndex on the MoonWeird Moon
Unrealistic Black HoleArtistic License - AstronomyWeird Moon

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