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The Old Convict
aka: The Old Con

Freeman plays "Red" Redding, a lifer who knows the ropes at Maine's "Shawshank State Prison."
— From the DVD blurb for The Shawshank Redemption

You'll find him in just about every prison film and television series ever made. He's the old convict that's been inside as long as anyone can remember (maybe he even received a Longer-Than-Life Sentence). He knows everything there is to know about how the prison works, and can explain it to new inmates. He tends to have the respect of most of his fellow inmates (except maybe the Ax-Crazy psychos).

If the central characters decide to break out, the Old Convict probably won't go with them, realising he no longer knows how to survive in the outside world. He may die at the hands of the authorities or vicious fellow inmates (maybe in an attack actually aimed at the hero), inspiring the heroes to either escape or seek vengeance.

Only occasionally related to The Con or the Con Man.

Examples:

    open/close all folders 

    Comic Books 
  • Ben 99 in the 2000AD serial Harry 20 on the High Rock. Seemed more than a little stir crazy. Turned out not to be what he seemed, in more ways than one.
  • Curly in Hard Time is the oldest lifer in State. Coincidentally, his cellmate is the youngest — 15-year-old school shooter Ethan Harrow. Curly went into prison in his early 20s, and by now is your typical crotchety old man, having come to terms with the fact that he'll never be free again. His long-lost granddaughter managed to get him out on appeal.
    • Curly isn't much of a mentor, and largely doesn't even consider Ethan his friend. Instead, the mentor role is split between two other inmates: Cole, a thirtysomething career criminal who's been in and out of the joint all his life; and "Fruitcake" Mullins, who is around Curly's age but serving a much lighter sentence. Oh, and Fruitcake is the only principal character to die of natural causes in prison.
    • Ethan himself served his full 50 years, though he notes that after the first 10 or so he stopped making friends and just did his time quietly.

    Film - Animated 
  • Chatter Telephone in Toy Story 3. He has been at Sunnyside Daycare Center for the longest time. Even before Lotso Bear took it over. To help Woody and his friends escape the daycare center, Chatter Telephone detailedly describes the layout of the daycare center and warns Woody that the only way for a toy to escape is to neutralize the Cymbal Monkey's surveillance system.
  • "Jack" Andy Beanstalk who Puss meets in prison in Puss in Boots. He provides useful information about "the Great Terror".
  • Jafar disguises himself as one of these in Aladdin, in a Monte Cristo reference.

    Film - Live Action 
  • Coach in Death Race. His sentence was actually over years ago, but he stays in prison because he has nowhere else to go.
  • English from Escape from Alcatraz; a black inmate serving two life sentences for killing two white men in self-defense.
  • Frank Perry in The Escapist. He is a lifer and has long accepted that he will never see the outside again. Events conspire to cause him to rethink this and start planning an escape.
  • Fergus Wilks (David Kelly) in Greenfingers. Fergus is the one who introduces Colin to gardening.
  • Over the course of the film Life (Eddie Murphy & Martin Lawrence) the two characters become this over the course of decades of incarceration.
  • Pop in the original version of The Longest Yard, called Skitchy in the remake, who remains in prison far past his original sentence for having struck a guard who later became the warden. Crewe asks him if hitting the warden was worth an extra 20 years — Pops/Skitchy hesitates momentarily and says it absolutely was.
    • The equivalent character in the British remake Mean Machine is Doc, who teaches Meehan everything he knows about the prison's goings-on.
  • Slammer in Micmacs, who introduces himself by saying that he's been in prison for 3/4ths of his life. He uses his status as an old-time prisoner to distract some drug dealers long enough for Bazil to steal their heroin.
  • The Shawshank Redemption: Ellis Boyd "Red" Redding. Also Brooks, though he doesn't seem to be quite as prison-savvy as Red. Or at the very least, it's not as obvious.
  • Genflou, from the 1952 film version of Les MisÚrables; a character who is not in the novel and was created to fill this role in the film version.
  • Stroud in the latter half of Birdman Of Alcatraz, having grown into this role over the course of his years in prison.
  • The original Zorro becomes one of these in The Mask of Zorro, after he gives up hope when he is arrested, his home destroyed, and his wife and child apparently killed. After twenty years, though, he finds the strength to break out.

    Literature 
  • 'Low Key' Lyesmith in American Gods by Neil Gaiman. Like many other examples, there is more to Lyesmith than meets the eye.
  • Older Than Radio: Abbe Faria in The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas (and its various film and television adaptations). He teaches Dantes everything he will need to know for his new life on the outside, tells him where a firtune is hidden, and his death provides Dantes with his means of escape.
  • General Jan Dodonna in The Krytos Trap serves this purpose for the captured Corran Horn in Ysanne Isard's Lusankya prison. Though he doesn't go not because he doesn't know what to do, but because he's the highest-ranking Rebel prisoner, knows they can't get the other Rebels out, and also knows that if he escapes without them she'll have them killed.
  • In Donald Westlake's Help, I Am Being Held Prisoner!, the protagonist is an inveterate practical joker who is in jail after a prank gone wrong. His Cellmate is an archetype old con provider of good advice.
  • Babe Fraser in The Stars' Tennis Balls by Stephen Fry. As this novel is a re-imagining of The Count of Monte Cristo, this should not come as a surprise.
  • In Darkness at Noon, while Rubashov has been in other prisons before, and No. 406 had spent twenty years in another prison, No. 402 has known this particular prison for years.

    Live Action TV 
  • Francois Villars in the MacGyver episode "The Escape". He explains to Mac how the prison works but does not accompany him when he escapes.
  • When Earl is in jail in My Name Is Earl and looks for a gang to join, he finds that the Old Con gang aren't any more adapted to survival inside the prison than anyone else.
  • Bob Rebadow in Oz. Despite his delusions, Rebadow seems clued into everything that goes on in Oz.
  • The Villain of the Week of one episode of Lois and Clark was a bank robber who had been in prison since the 1930's recession. After he breaks out a guard mentions an workplace legend that they built the prison around him.
    • The villain of the Season 1 finale was also a former gangster who spent most of his life in prison after being betrayed by his partner- he was also imprisoned in The Thirties, and got out a month before the events of the episode. Both of these episodes were broadcast in the mid-nineties.
  • Porridge:
    • Fletcher. Although Fletch has been in and out of prison his entire life rather than spending most of it inside serving a single sentence, he still fulfills the role of explaining the system to newcomers.
    • A more conventional Old Con is the very ancient Blanco. When we first see him, he's completed a replica of Muffin the Mule in the prison workshop: "You know, him what's on television." (Muffin the Mule was broadcast from 1946 to 1957. The Porridge episode was broadcast in 1975.)
  • Jarod meets one in an episode of The Pretender when he's trying to help a wrongly convicted murderer.
  • D.B. Cooper, alias Charles Westmoreland, in Prison Break. He is introduced as Fox River's longest-serving inmate (thirty-two years) and he tells Scofield that he has sixty more years left on his sentence.
  • Randall spent time in the old cell block and gave the Winchesters information in the episode "Folsom Prison Blues" (S02, Ep19) of Supernatural.
  • On Orange Is The New Black, Miss Claudette Pelage is this. She is in jail for murdering someone who raped one of her employees. She ends up getting even more time after attacking a guard.

    Manga 
  • Anchan in Rainbow Nisha Rokubou No Shichinin, relatively speaking. He's just a teenager, but he's been in prison longer than the others, and he functions as a mentor figure.

    Video Games 
  • In The Chronicles of Riddick: Escape from Butcher Bay, Riddick encounters an old prisoner in the Single Max section, who among other things asks Riddick what his first kill was like ("that's between me and him" being Riddick's answer), and offers Riddick a reward if he gets rid of a troublesome inmate. In a Shout-Out to The Shawshank Redemption, he's named "Red".
  • Eddie Gordo's backstory from Tekken 3 is that he was framed by the Mishimas, and while in prison, was trained in Capoeira by the oldest convict interned there. Christie Monteiro is the old man's granddaughter.

    Web Comics 
  • Doyle in The Lydian Option describes himself as the "welcoming committee" - a human who introduces new human prisoners to life in the alien prison and shows them the ropes.
  • Ian Starshine fills this role at the gladiator camp in The Order of the Stick; his reference to being nicknamed "Red" is a Shout-Out to The Shawshank Redemption. He's not as reliable as typical examples of this trope, though.

    Web Original 
  • Claudette, Chapman's bunkmate in the Netflix original series Orange Is The New Black, although she has no interest in showing Chapman or any other younger prisoners the ropes.

    Western Animation 
  • The Simpsons: 'The last registered Democrat' who helps the Simpsons escape the government re-education centre in the episode "Bart-Mangled Banner".
  • In the Family Guy episode "Cool Hand Peter", the gang meets an old black inmate who tells them that depsite the fact they were sentenced to thirty days, they're in the jail forever.


Oh Wait, This Is My Grocery ListOlder Than RadioOpen Sesame
Might as Well Not Be in Prison at AllPrison TropesPassive Rescue
The Obi-WanEldersOlder Hero vs. Younger Villain
Obsolete MentorMentorsOld Master
Offstage VillainyCharacters as DeviceOld Friend
Old-School ChivalryAlways MaleThe One Guy
Neighbourhood Friendly GangstersCriminalsOutlaw
Book SafeImageSource/Live-Action FilmsRedemption in the Rain

alternative title(s): The Old Con
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