troperville

tools

toys


main index

Narrative

Genre

Media

Topical Tropes

Other Categories

TV Tropes Org
random
Straw Misogynist
Grumpy: She's a female! And all females is poison! They're full of wicked wiles!
Bashful: What are wicked wiles?
Grumpy: I don't know, but I'm agin' em!

A character drawn as having hateful views of women so that he can be proven wrong.

The Straw Misogynist is usually male (but not always) and hates or has contempt for women in general. Many times, he backs up his theories with pseudo-scientific evidence that men are inherently superior in every domain and that women ought to Stay in the Kitchen and grovel at the feet of men in light of these "irrefutable" proofs that all women are worthy of his contempt and ridicule. He is likely to interpret the fact that many women do well in business, science and so on as some kind of insult and attack against him personally.

This trope often relies heavily on a pro-male, anti-female, version of Mars and Venus Gender Contrast. Compare He-Man Woman Hater, for a generally less extreme (and often more rounded) version, Effeminate Misogynistic Guy for especially feminine varieties of misogynist, and Licensed Sexist for the comedic version.

If you are unsure if a character is a Straw Misogynist, they're usually anvilicious in execution, and are either painted by the narrative as being wrong or are proven wrong by events or characters in the story. Of course, this rarely changes their mind.

No Real Life examples, please.


Examples:

    open/close all folders 

    Anime and Manga 

    Comicbooks 
  • Most Golden Age Wonder Woman villains fit this category, notably Ares, who keeps women in chains as slaves. Dr. Psycho, in his first story, is a phony medium who can summon the "ghost of George Washington" and uses this fake psychic projection to denounce the inclusion of women in the US Armed Forces. As time goes on, Psycho eventually turns into a disgusting sadist with a particular fondness for torturing and utterly breaking women, which firmly cemented his status as one of the single most vile individuals in the DCU.
  • In the 1970s, when feminism became mainstream and Wonder Woman became a feminist icon, there was another surge in women-hating villains. See, for example, The Twelve Labors.

    Fan Fiction 

    Films — Animated 

    Films — Live-Action 
  • 300 makes the Persians into a race of these. Unintentionally subverted when the Spartan Queen's witty retort ("Only Spartan women give birth to real men!") still portrays her worth only as a means of giving birth to more men.
  • Lloyd Hooks from Cloud Atlas claims he doesn't take "Women's lib seriously" and says that right in front of Intrepid Reporter Luisa Rey.
  • In a World...: Gustav. Carol's father shares many of the same attitudes but is more nuanced and, unlike Gustav, learns An Aesop by the end of the film.

    Literature 
  • Mona Gardner's The Dinner Party: A guest at a dinner party in colonial India insists that women are useless in a crisis as they always scream and panic, whereas men have the nerve to suppress their emotions. Naturally, the plot of the short story involves him getting his comeuppance when a woman shows more control than a man in a situation where the guests lives are at stake. To be specific, she's the first one to realize there's a cobra in the room, under the dining table — crawling across her foot.
  • In the Star Wars Expanded Universe, as if trying to make him as thoroughly dislikable as possible, Emperor Palpatine is revealed to be one of these in addition to being a racist, mass-murdering totalitarian maniac. It's quite ironic, then, that the warlords who make up the last of the dying Empire are essentially united and revived by a woman.
    • In all fairness, the Emperor considers everyone beneath him, regardless of gender or species.
  • In The Millennium Trilogy, all of the male villains are either white supremacists or murderers, rapists and abusers of women (thus the "Men Who Hate Women" of the first book's title)
  • The Sword of Truth: All male villains. Yes, all of them.
  • Many villains in The Culture series, probably because the Culture itself is an egalitarian utopia.
    • This is practically the hat of the aliens in both The Player of Games and Excession, although it's played seriously in the former and for Black Comedy in the latter.
    • The misogynistic Azadians of The Player of Games are almost equally biased against males. Being a species with three sexes, the dominant pseudo-hermaphraditic sex, referred to as apexes, looks down on both males and females. Females are considered property (for breeding purposes) while males are considered little more than Cannon Fodder for the Empire's military. There's even a reference to them having spent a few generations with a eugenics/genetic-engineering program designed to leave all the males as Dumb Muscle.
    • Veppers, the Corrupt Corporate Executive villain of Surface Detail is also quite misogynistic in the sense that he sees them as little more than sexual objects. Then again, he hardly bears any more respect for men (he's just not interested in having sex with them). He's pretty much a narcissist who doesn't value anyone but himself.
  • Sisterhood Series by Fern Michaels: A number of male villains are very much this. Mitch Riley from the book Hide and Seek and Henry "Hank" Jellicoe would be some major examples.
  • The representatives to ASEAN in the Dale Brown novel Sky Masters. Those that we see speaking anyway.
  • Drake from Gone. You can pick up on it in early books to some extent, but by the fifth book, practically every one of his perspective chapters has something about how much he hates women. Diana lampshades it.
  • An minor villain in a Mercedes Lackey novel is usually an example of this trope, as are many of the major villains. The evil sorcerer from The Black Swan (which is not to be confused with the movie of the same name) is probably the most glaring example.
  • Subverted by most of the Graysons in the Honor Harrington novels - while they're sexist and patriarchal, they mean it when they say that they are protecting their women by keeping them out of the workforce and military. When Honor proves them wrong by saving their planet, they accept their mistakes, and practically canonize her. In later novels, some Manticorans occasionally note that Grayson men still have a tendency to be protective of women. Played extremely straight by their fratricidal sister planet Masada, however. The true depth of their hatred becomes apparent when Honor discovers that of the nineteen female Manticoran personnel captured by the Masadans, only two survived the subsequent beatings and repeated gang-rapes. The Graysons are just as horrified as Honor, and later execute all the Masadan personnel responsible.
  • Joren of Stone Mountain, Keladry's main antagonist for the first two-and-a-half Protector of the Small books. He's completely obsessed with driving Keladry out of knight training. Even after they're both squires and ostensibly out of each other's hair, he hangs around to continue giving a name and face to Tortallan culture's deep-rooted misogyny.

    Live-Action TV 
  • Joss Whedon's televised work:
    • Angel had a character that unleashed the latent violent misogyny. Apparently, all men have one of these inside them, they're just repressed. And that sociopathic vampires are above such petty concerns.
    • Firefly: "Heart of Gold" included one of these as a villain. Anviliciously, he goes so far as to force a woman to service him in public. Somewhat counterbalanced by the adherence to the Hooker with a Heart of Gold trope.
    • Buffy the Vampire Slayer had Warren Mears in Season 6, and, in Season 7, Caleb, The Dragon of the season's Big Bad, the First Evil.
  • Robin Hood: Subverted by the Sheriff of Nottingham. Throughout the series, Vaizey makes several disparaging remarks toward women, and often refers to them as "lepers". However, there was an interesting subtext that suggested that it was all a show for the benefit of his Dragon, who he didn't want getting too close to any female who could threaten the influence Vaizey held over Guy. The only character Vaizey shows any love for is his sister, and he never underestimates Marian, even when Guy and Robin do. When an Abbess comes to the castle and a guard argues against letting her into a room where the tax money is kept, the Sheriff's response is notably not "she's just a woman", but "she's just a nun." Admittedly since the abbess turned out to be a thief who successfully stole all the money and escaped from a locked room in that case he did underestimate her, even though he clearly never trusted her
  • The Sheriff in Robin of Sherwood has pretty strong elements of this. If there's a woman in his storyline, he's either dismissive, insulting, or trying to marry her for her money. And in those latter cases, he doesn't even pretend to care about them.
  • The Ferengi and Kazon from Star Trek. The Ferengi largely change their views when the economic benefits of having twice as many people (give or take a few) spending and making money become apparent.
  • Doctor Who has Riddell from "Dinosaurs on a Spaceship" who fits this trope perfectly. He exists solely as a token male with out of date opinions in order to make Amy and Queen Nefertiti look good. He does nothing else in the episode other than this. He clearly demonstrates through his words and actions that he thinks of women as inferior throughout the episode. He is, however, delighted when he's proven wrong by the both of them, and becomes genuinely enamored with Nefertiti in part because she's so strong willed.
  • One episode of New Tricks featured a misogynistic university professor with gender theory cribbed straight from r/theredpill, and who used manosphere jargon such as 'mangina' just so the main characters could say "if [not hating women] makes me a mangina, book me in for a Brazilian".

    Multiple Media 
  • Omega Zell from Noob has his misogyny used mostly for making him a Politically Incorrect Hero, but showing him to be wrong about women is a recurring point of the franchise.

    Professional Wrestling 
  • Jeff Jarrett went through a period where his entire characterization was to be one of these, who spent all his screen time ranting about how women should literally be "barefoot and pregnant." This culminated in every single female wrestler interrupting one of his monologues to kick his ass.

    Tabletop Games 

    Webcomics 
  • Dominic Deegan: The character 'Stunt' started out as one, and still has many, many elements. He's also a plain ol' Jerkass. Evil Orcs also fall into this category. He's pretty-much graduated to a standard He-Man Woman Hater at this point.
  • Sluggy Freelance's villain Dr. Nofun, is portrayed as extremely sexist; his beliefs are so over-the-top that it's clearly meant to be played for comedy. Recently, larger versions of his misogynist PSAs have been running as the weekend filler with the disclaimer: "The opinions expressed here are the views of a fictional two-dimensional villain and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of Sluggy Freelance LLC, it's subsidiaries, supersidiaries, and slightly less fictional avian representation in perpetuity, esquire." This is played even straighter when it's revealed that his misogyny is all just an act to get a group of weak-willed women and terrified men that he can use the threat of the female bogeyman to control their every thought, so his minions won't rebel against him.
  • New guy Wes in Between Failures is this, most certainly. He claims that Mike, being male, should have "put [Carol] in her place," and seems to think that, given enough time, he can seduce any woman (even one as weird as Brooksie), which is clearly the only reason women exist in his world.
  • There are a lot in Sinfest. Satan encourages this with his "Patriarchy".
  • Overwhelmingly used in "Shortpacked!" in a large number of strips.

    Video Games 
  • Quoted above, the party member Eldoth from Baldur's Gate is a sleazy bard who makes his living seducing women to take advantage of their riches. If the player groups with him and Shar-teel, a vocal misandrist, the two inevitably come to blows. The mismatch in combat strength between Eldoth (a bard) and Shar-teel (a warrior) means that Eldoth is almost always slaughtered in the confrontation, barring luck or the hero's intervention. Whether or not this was intended by the developers isn't known.
  • Persona 4 has Adachi, who turns out to be the killer. Bitches and whores, indeed.
  • One bonus episode of Pokemon Mystery Dungeon Explorers of Sky stars the legendary all-female Team Charm. A minor character, a Houndoom, exists in that chapter and only gets two lines: one is expressing blatant sexism towards Team Charm, and the other reveals him as a hypocritical coward.

    Western Animation 
  • Family Guy: Peter Griffin becomes this for one episode, to the point of thinking that it's illegal for women to drive.
  • Johnny Bravo was flanderized into one.
  • King of the Hill:
    • One episode has Alan Rickman playing the "king" of a Renaissance Fair who treats female performers like garbage and hides behind the defense of "historical accuracy".
    • Cotton Hill as well, though he's just plain a Jerkass and an example of Screw Politeness, I Killed Fitty Men!
    • Coach Kleehammer makes Cotton look progressive with comments like "Title IX (was) Dick Nixon's biggest mistake!"
  • Fnog, Leela's former martial arts instructor in Futurama. "Better than being a girl. Like you. You're a girl!"
  • Stoked has main character Reef, who tends to taunt his fellow female surfers with claims that women are naturally inferior surfers to men. This particularly ticks off Action Girl Fin, who is not only better than he is (if only just) at surfing, she's One of the Boys to the extent she can pretty much beat him at any "manly activity" he cares to name.
  • It was this specific trait in Total Drama that caused Ezekiel to gain the honor of being the first contestant to be eliminated in the entire series. Somewhat justified in that he was a sheltered, home-schooled farm boy.
    • Emphasis on "straw" in this one. Ezekiel wasn't mean-spirited, he just said something to the effect that women should be taken care of, and was genuinely confused that he'd somehow offended everyone. Had he received any sympathy from the cast, he would have quickly changed his mind, something which is proven when we see a much more laid-back and pro-equality Ezekiel later in the series.
  • Billy from The Grim Adventures of Billy & Mandy acted this way in regards to Mandy in at least three episodes, first barring her from playing a board game with him and Irwin, then not letting her work on his and Irwin's go-kart and not letting her join their baseball team even though she was an amazing batter and his team stood no chance against Mindy's, and it was obvious that it was because Mandy is better than him at about everything.


Strawman BallThe War on StrawStraw Nihilist
Stout StrengthAlways MaleStumbling Upon the Lost Wizard
Straw FeministThe Only Righteous Index of FanaticsStraw Vegetarian
Strawman News MediaAdministrivia/No Real Life Examples, Please!Straw Nihilist
Straw FeministCharacters as DeviceStraw Nihilist

alternative title(s): Straw Misogyny; Straw Mysogynist
random
TV Tropes by TV Tropes Foundation, LLC is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available from thestaff@tvtropes.org.
Privacy Policy
45860
5