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Stock Object Colors
There are stereotyped object colors that are highly prevalent in fiction, but do not reflect Real Life color variations. They have become embedded in popular consciousness through sheer repetition, to the point that exceptions just seem odd.

Subtrope of Reality Is Unrealistic. The color version of The Coconut Effect.


Examples:

Purple Grapes

In Real Life, grapes can be purple, yellow-green, red violet, and red, but in fiction, they're purple because purple is the color grapes are associated with. Green might be used, but it would give the impression the grapes are underripe.

Blue or Light Blue Water

In Real Life, water comes in a wide range of colors, including clear, turquoise, cyan, light blue, blue-green, dark green, dark blue, and the stereotypical bright shade of blue.note 

Not so much in fiction, where water is usually a bright shade of blue. Water Is Blue because it's easier to animate than a transparent liquid and because large amounts of water appear blue due to the way it diffuses light. This subtrope, which is highly prevalent in fiction, does not reflect how Real Life water is entirely accurately.

Green or Yellow Green Acid

It even has a shade named after it despite the fact that green acidic substances are rare, and no strong or commonly used acids are green.

Green or Yellow Green Grass

In fiction, grass is usually green or yellow green because green or yellow green grass is iconic and easily recognizable.

In Real Life, golden yellow, light brown, and sandy yellow, as well as the stereotypical green and yellow green, are common colors for grass.

Green or Yellow Green Radioactive Nuclear Waste

Green and yellow green are the colors associated with nuclear waste, radiation, and anything nuclear even though this is seldom the case in Real Life. Cherenkov radiation in the pools of nuclear reactors is blue, radioactive cesium chloride fluoresces faintly blue, and hot radioactives are orange.

The association with the colors green and yellow green and nuclear waste comes from peoples' experience with radium painted watch dials, which glow pale green. Watch dials haven't contained radium for decades. Currently they use a similar sort of paint but no radium; it absorbs light when placed in light and then glows for a while in the dark.

Yellow Sun

In Real Life, the sun is white or yellowish white, but in fiction its yellowness is played up because yellow is the color associated with the sun.

Yellow or Gold Stars

In Real Life stars can be pretty much any color, but the stars the naked eye can see in the night sky are white. In fiction, stars in the sky—especially those drawn as large, five-pointed "sticker" stars—are usually yellow to contrast the night sky's dark blue.

Star-shaped stickers and badges are virtually always gold in fiction because they're given out in a congratulatory manner—in other words, they're a proxy for a gold medal. Needless to say, in Real Life you can get star stickers and badges in pretty much any color, though gold is still the most popular.

Yellow or Orange Cheese

Cheese comes in many colors, including yellow, orange, yellow-orange, light yellow, red, white, and even blue, but in cartoons, it's hard to find any examples where cheese hasn't been depicted cheddar yellow-orange or orange.

Bright orange cheeses, especially cheddar, are usually that color because it's been colored.

Orange Carrots

Almost all carrots in fiction are bright orange because an orange carrot is iconic and easily recognizable and orange is the most common color seen in Reallife Western carrots. note 

This association with the color orange and carrots is Newer Than They Think, as the common orange carrots in the Western world were only bred that color a few centuries ago by farmers in the Netherlands, out of patriotic reverence for the House of Orange-Nassau. Before this, most carrots in the West were actually purple. No, really, carrots used to be purple. And carrots come in other colors, like yellow, red, purplish red, and white.

Red Apples

Most apples in fiction are bright red because a red apple is iconic and easily recognizable.

In Real Life, apples come in a wide range of colors, including red, orange, yellow, and green, and can be more than one of those colors as well.

A common exception would be "sour apple" or candies that are apple flavored, which are often green, especially to distinguish other flavors, such as strawberry or cherry, that are almost always red.

Red Fire Hydrants

In Real Life, they come in a wide range of colors, including yellow (both light and golden shades), pink, white, dark green, orange, dull shades of red, and the stereotypical bright shade of red, and can even have two or more colors on them.

Not so much in fiction, where almost all fire hydrants are bright red. Fictional fire hydrants are usually red because a red hydrant is iconic and easily recognizable. This subtrope, which is highly prevalent in fiction, does not reflect how Real Life fire hydrants are.

Brown or Green Polluted Water

Water intended to look polluted is colored either olive green, yellow-green, or brown rather than blue or clear.

Same concept is also commonly applied to swamp water, "blackwater" in real life can look brown, tan, greenish, or pitch black.

Skin Color

The skin colour of white people nearly always depicted as pink, and we're told it's pink, but in reality its a much more subtle selection of light browns, translucency, red beneath the skin, with some blue.


Space Does Not Work That WayCommon Fan FallaciesTelevision Is Trying to Kill Us
Space Does Not Work That WayReality Is UnrealisticTechnicolor Science

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