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Slobs Versus Snobs
aka: Slobs Vs Snobs

"We see a culture that is strong and despise it as crude."
Uthan the Perverse (on the Orkz), Warhammer 40,000

They are well groomed, clean, stylishly dressed, and treat those around as inferior, be it at a Renaissance court or a slum. They are scruffy, dirty, dressed entirely from the used clothes discount pile, and act like boorish rabble.

They will usually be in close proximity, at least in the same neighborhood, city, or space sector. And of course they fight. The scale of the conflict can be any size, be it a clique vs. clique social power struggle in a school, a street brawl between rival gangs, or two species or even Planet of Hats at war. When cranked Up to Eleven, it can cross into armed revolution, or either Kill the Poor or Eat the Rich.

Beyond the superficial dichotomy this conflict is one of lifestyle and worldview. The Snobs are epicurean, refined, and educatedbut classist and vain, while Slobs are honest, revelrous and dionysianbut violent and dangerous. As a narrative device, Slobs Versus Snobs is notable in that it rarely presents both sides equally. More often than not, the Slobs are presented in a far more sympathetic light than the Snobs.

On the Sliding Scale of Shiny Versus Gritty, Snobs would be shiny and Slobs would be gritty.

Compare/see also Elves VS Dwarves and Fur Against Fang, where the Snobs will be elves or vampires, and the Slobs will be Dwarves or Werewolves respectively. (Though vampire elves and werewolf dwarves aren't out of the question, nor for that matter are Elven Vampire Werewolves). The trope Rich Suitor, Poor Suitor is what happens when you mix slobs vs snobs with a love triangle.

See also They Fight Crime.


Examples:

    open/close all folders 

    Advertising 
  • A car commercial had a skier and a snowboarder coasting down the slope side by side. The snowboarder shouted "Dweeb!", to which the skier responded "Delinquent!"

    Anime & Manga 
  • In Death Note, this isn't the core of the conflict between Light (snob) and L (slob), but the contrast is certainly played up. Their allies also tend to fit; stylishly dressed Knights Templar vs. Defective Detectives. Ironically, Light is middle class, while L is ridiculously rich enough to buy a skyscraper.
  • One Piece: The clash of the Marines (Snobs) and the Pirates (Slobs), though we see aversions on both sides. For example, the rough-and-tumble Garp for the Marines and suave and stylish pirates like Sanji or Robin. Played straight with the Celestial Dragons vs — well, everyone else.
  • In Beelzebub, this happens when protagonist and his True Companions, who hail from a delinquent ridden Inner City School, clash with the Absurdly Powerful Student Council of the posh private school they are transferred to.
  • In the Conviction arc of Berserk, a socio-religious stratification is presented between the upper class Knight Templar Holy Iron Chain Knights of the Holy See who resided within the castle town of St. Albion and the impoverished, hedonistic pagan refugees who lived in shanty towns outside of St. Albion. Their strife escalates when our two ill-fated Weirdness Magnets Guts and Casca are added to the mix, and all hell just breaks loose after that.
  • Magical Girl Lyrical Nanoha ViVid has Delinquent leader Harry/Halley/Hallie Tribeca and The Ojou Victoria Dahlgrün, who despite sharing the same set of friends, hates each others guts and general demeanor with a passion.
  • Shinsengumi as slobs and Mimawarigumi as snobs in Gintama.
  • Sailor Moon:
    • In Codename: Sailor V and the Sailor Moon manga, Minako's dislike for the police has sides of this, with her remarking more than once that she sees police officers as arrogant snobs and taking on normal criminals just to rub in their face how the slobbish girl in a ridiculous costume (Minako considered her Sailor V outfit as ridiculous) could do their job better than them. To underline this aspect, Minako had absolutely no problem when she found out her friend and fellow idol fan Natsuna Sakurada was the Superintendent-General of the Tokyo Metropolitan Police (the single most important police officer of Japan and commander-in-chief of Tokyo's police), and in fact gave her a few pointer to avoid getting lynched by other fans.
    • In the manga, Minako and Rei started with a mild version of this, as the blunt and tomboyish gyaru ante-litteram that is Minako and the aristocratic and feminine Yamato Nadeshiko that is Rei are so different they barely understand each other, and mistake each others' attempts at being friendly for insults. By the end of the manga they have overcome their differences, and their relationship is implied to be a Romantic Two-Girl Friendship.
  • In Cafe Kichijouji De, the competent yet obsessive Neat Freak supervisor Taro is always arguing with the laidback, disorganized slop Maki.

    Comic Books 
  • The Beano:
    • This UK comic book had Dennis the Menace (UK) (not to be confused with the US version) who was a catapult wielding tearaway against the more nicely brought up Softies.
    • Lord Snooty and his family versus the Gasworks Gang. Most of Lord Snooty's close friends were also commoners, though; in the first issue, he decides they're more fun than his posh friends.
    • Posh Street School is one of the two schools that has a rivalry with Bash Street in The Bash Street Kids. (The other being Blob Street, which is more or less the same socioeconomic status as Bash Street.)
  • The old UK comic book Smash! had a series called "The Swots and The Blots" that was neat preppy kids verses the scruffy troublemakers.
  • The Dandy had "The Jocks and the Geordies". Interestingly in this one, the Geordies are the snobs, despite being archetypally cast as the Slobs/the hard guys (even before Viz came on the scene).
  • The Nutty had two families living next door to each other, actually called "The Snobs and the Slobs".
  • Cor!! had "Ivor Lott and Tony Broke". Sister comic Jackpot had their Distaff Counterparts "Millie O'Naire and Penny Less". When both comics were merged with Buster, the male and female versions teamed up.
  • The Toffs and the Toughs: The reader was expected to side with the poor characters (common, as comics sell disproportionately to working class children.) Another similiarly named and themed strip from the same publisher was called Smarty's Toffs and Tatty's Toughs. This in fact appeared to be a merger of The Toffs and the Toughs with Smarty Pants and Tatty Ed. British comics loved this trope.
  • Class Wars: The premise was children of different social classes mixing in the same class at school. The name was later toned down to Top of the Class. In this case, both sides had their moments, but the commoners were more usually the heroes.
  • On Minimonsters, we have Frank's gang (The good ones) and Morty's gang (The evil ones). They are complete opposites, an hate the other gang deeply. While Frank's gang are good and they help the other people in the town; Morty's gang are "delinquents" and they are dedicated to humiliate Frank's gang and the others.
  • It's a Nice Life: A comic strip version of The Good Life. It played up the snobbery of the conservative family and made the self-sufficient family much more loutish— thereby completely missing the point of the original series which was that both couples were very much middle-class householders - Tom and Barbara could only embark in their life of self-sufficiency because they owned a house with quite a large garden, after all.
  • Toffee Nose: A hugely "stuck up" girl from a very "common" family and Posh Claude, a character in Cheeky who always put on airs.
  • The idea comes up in the first Nikolai Dante storyline.
    Jena: I was trained in the arts of war by the finest military commanders in the empire.
    Nikolai: And I learned to fight in the sleaziest bars in the thieves' world. Let's get it on!
  • A US variant, The House Next Door had a smart All-American capitalist family living next to the more run-down home of a Russian communist family.

    Fan Works 
  • The main character of Christian Humber Reloaded attacks a party full of "snobs" for no apparent reason, killing many people and causing trillions of dollars in damage. He later returns to test out his new dragon powers.

    Films — Live-Action 
  • In Jumping the Broom, the main conflict is between Jason's working-class mother, Pam, and his fiancée Sabrina's wealthy family. Sabrina's mother Claudine sees Pam as low-class, and Pam sees Claudine as uppity.
  • Accepted: The frat boys of B.K.E. vs. the rejected masses of S.H.I.T.
  • Animal House practically codified the collegiate version of this with the clash between houses.
  • Christopher Nolan's Batman trilogy The Dark Knight Saga used this in its depiction of corruption in Gotham city. It is most evident in the third and final entry, The Dark Knight Rises as Bane uses the class warfare between the spoiled wealthy elite and the hard working lower class blue collar citizens to destroy Gotham from the inside.
  • Underworld: the vampires all wear stylish, clean black suits and gorgeous sexy cocktail dresses when at leisure, and leather trenchcoats when hunting werewolves. Their hair is always flat and oily, curls are always cosmetic, neat, and hang down. Werewolves on the other hand are always in grungy brown leather, shirts that look like they haven't been washed in months, and have hair that generally defies combs to come near.
  • Meatballs has the slobs from Camp North Star versus the snobs from Camp Mohawk. Bill Murray gives an iconic speech just before the climactic showdown admitting that beating the snobs won't matter, since even in defeat they'd still be rich.
  • Caddyshack invoked the trope as a tagline, as the movie is set in a country club (full of snobs) being annoyed by a slovenly outsider.
  • Inglourious Basterds: On one side, a team of sociopathic heroes. On the other, the most Wicked Cultured Nazis of all time.
  • The snazzy restaurant scene from Ferris Bueller's Day Off, from the incredibly snooty maitre d', to Cameron crunching on the ice from his water. However, this is more a case of age and attitude than class, since all the main characters come from wealthy families.
  • In O.C. and Stiggs, it's the lower-middle-class title characters versus the nouveau riche Schwabs. (The rivalry turns up in the original story, but only in the film is it the central plot.)
  • The title characters from The Blues Brothers find one of their old band members working as maitre d' at a fancy restaurant. They act like total slobs and threaten to come back every day unless the guy comes with them.
  • La vie est un long fleuve tranquille by Etienne Chatiliez combines this with Switched at Birth.
  • As in the original novel, Eloi and Morlocks in The Time Machine.
  • In Braveheart, the English are led by sophisticated Anglo-Norman aristocrats, while the Scots are led by hairy, kilted Highlanders. However, The Protagonist, William Wallace, is well-educated and speaks several languages.
  • The Marx Brothers were practically the kings of this trope. Every movie was an excuse for them to infiltrate society and make the aristocrats suffer.
  • The Three Stooges as well — Depression-era comedy was pretty keen for Break the Haughty situations involving rich people.
  • The Houseof Yes has a one-man slob army in the form of Leslie, having to square off against her fiancée's horribly stuck-up, wealthy family.
  • Demolition Man: The slobs (led by Edgar Friendly) vs. snobs (enslaved by Dr. Cocteau.) While the title Demolition Man identifies more with the slobs, he tells them "you are going to get a lot more clean" as opposed to telling the snobs "you're going to get a little dirty". Of course, the "slobs" were forced to live in the sewers upon refusing to conform to Cocteau's immensely restricting mandates, and the bulk of their possessions come from what they manage to scavenge or steal, so they don't really have the ability to live a clean lifestyle.
  • In Out Cold, a group of working-class snowboarders attempt to save their beloved small town from a businessman who wants to turn it into a snooty resort town similar to Aspen, Colorado.
  • All of The Mighty Ducks films. The 3rd one really plays it up as the Ducks get scholarships for a prestigious school and instantly butt heads with the current students there.
  • Troop Beverly Hills: The children of fantastically rich parents are the underdogs, while a militant troop of middle-class jerks are the villains.
  • In Stripes, Bill Murray's character alludes to slobs triumphing over snobs during a speech he gives to the other enlisted men.
    John Winger: We're Americans... That means that our forefathers were kicked out of every decent country in the world. We are the wretched refuse. We're the underdog. We're mutts! Here's proof: His nose is cold! But there's no animal that's more faithful, that's more loyal, more lovable than the mutt. Who saw "Old Yeller"? Who cried when Old Yeller got shot at the end? Nobody cried when Old Yeller got shot? I'm sure. I cried my eyes out. So we're all dogfaces, we’re all very, very different, but there is one thing that we all have in common: We were all stupid enough to enlist in the Army. We're mutants. There's something wrong with us, something very, very wrong with us. Something seriously wrong with us — we're soldiers. But we're American soldiers! We've been kicking ass for 200 years! We're 10 and 1!
  • Played for Drama in the Mexican film Amar Te Duele, which shows the prejudices and discrimination between the Mexican upper and lower class.
  • Pretty much a staple of many '80s and '90s teen films. Often, Saving the Orphanage is a major plot element. For examples, One Crazy Summer.

    Literature 
  • Discworld:
    • In Thud!, the werewolf Angua has to team up with a vampire — which she resents. Werewolves hate vampires, because vampires have style, and make werewolves look like low-class mutts. As Carrot points out, she's gorgeous and doesn't have anything to worry about. Nevertheless, it's something that's ingrained into the psyche of the two species. The werewolves are very much members of the political "establishment" in Uberwald, and Angua's brother Wolfgang is very much a case of Putting on the Reich while her father, not so much.
    • The wizards are generally the Snobs to the Slobs of the city watch, adventurers, or ordinary Morporkians. Due to the nature of the books' changing viewpoints, this is seen from both sides. In a wizard-centric book, the Wizards will be fat and goofy, but capable and wise, whereas the citizens and guards will be an ignorant rabble who doesn't know what they're messing with. In a commoner-centric book, the wizards will seem like a load of pompous, out-of-touch bureaucrats while the commoners are the ones holding everything together. Unseen Academicals, which focused evenly on the wizards and their working-class servants, proved there's some truth to both viewpoints.
    • Hogfather features an argument between the Senior Wrangler and the Dean, based on the fact that the Dean's family hung up pillowcases for the Hogfather, while the Wrangler's hung up very small socks. The Dean's family also bought their holly instead of collecting it themselves, and had "la-di-da posh dinner in the evening" and a big Hogswatch tree in the hall.
      "I can't help it if my family had money," the Dean said, and this might have defused the situation had he not added, "And standards."
  • The Outsiders: With upper-class Socs (Socials) vs. lower-class Greasers. Neither group is entirely unified.
  • Harry Potter:
    • The family rivalry between the impoverished Weasleys and the high-society Malfoys.
    • The Weasleys are also often compared to the Dursleys. The Weasleys are a scruffy bunch with a kooky house and an overgrown garden. The Dursleys live in an overly tidy normal house and are generally obsessed with appearances.
    • The series uses a little bit of this in its depiction of conflict between the Hogwarts houses. The Slytherins, especially the present day ones as represented by Draco Malfoy, are portrayed as being from wealthy "pure blood" families while the other three houses — Gryffindor, Ravenclaw and Hufflepuff — are generally portrayed as being from more blue collar middle class families financially speaking.
  • In H. G. Wells' The Time Machine, there's the conflict between the ineffectual Eloi and the savage Morlocks.
  • Robert Westall's Futuretrack Five has very clear elements of this. The aristocratic, smug Ests are the Snobs and deliberately segregate and control the scruffy, violent, uneducated Unnems.
  • A very mild version plays out between Peter Wingfield and Roger Trembling in Fred, Alice and Aunty Lou from the Break of Dark anthology. Wingfield is unkempt, scruffily dressed, a chronic smoker and lives in a dilapidated old house full of mouldering antiques and dying pot plants, which Trembling refers to as "The Haunted Mansion." Roger lives in an ultra-modern villa with Modernist furnishings and chrome kitchen fittings, works for a computer company and plays squash every week. Peter refers to his house as "Mission Control."
  • Cold Comfort Farm is one of the few times that the Snobs win, with Flora Poste bringing order and modernity to the Gothic Starkadders, in the process greatly improving their lives.
  • Played With in A.L. Phillips's The Quest of the Unaligned, which features the dual conflict between Caederan's technological ignorance (Slobs) vs Tonzimmiel's modern civilization (Snobs) and Caederan's tradition of community and proper respect for nobility (Snobs) vs Tonzimmiel's intense and abrasive individualism (Slobs).
  • A Mage's Power: There is enmity between the Dragon's Lair and Roalt Castle along these lines; mecenaries care little for social mores or polite behavior while the coutrier's revolve around them.

    Live-Action TV 
  • Who, Sir? Me, Sir?: A sports contest between snobs from a private school and plucky underdogs who attend The Good Old British Comp.
  • The Twilight Zone episode "Spur of the Moment" used this setup where the girl is about to marry the rich boy, but the passionate poor scruffy guy ends up talking her into marrying him — years later we see Scruffy is a lazy bum who makes her life miserable.
  • The TV version of The Odd Couple often pitted Felix (snob) against Oscar (slob) in this matter.
  • Frasier: This is the central conflict between Frasier, Niles and Martin; the boys are stuffy epicures who are frequently dismissive of their down-to-earth, slightly slobby father. The crux of this is Martin's old chair, which clashes poorly with the rest of the room.
  • Cheers contrasted blue-collar characters like Sam, Carla, Cliff, and Norm with the more upscale characters like Diane, Frasier, Lilith, Robin, etc. Then there's Rebecca, who's essentially a Slob trying to ascend to the Snob world (and failing repeatedly).
  • The The Young Ones episode "Bambi" features this. The cast represent "Scumbag College" on "University Challenge" and are set against the snobs from Footlights College, Oxbridge .
  • The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air used this in some of the earlier episodes as a source of conflict between Will and his cousin Carlton. As the show wore on though, Carlton got dumber and dorkier until there was no more point in conflicting with the paragon-of-coolness Will.
    • Notably, it was also a rare subversion in that it depicted how, despite their wealth, the Bankses could still suffer from racism (such as being stopped by the police when they weren't doing anything wrong) from white people while also being accused by fellow blacks of being Category Traitors and "sellouts" because of their status. Uncle Phil gave a notable Shut Up, Hannibal! reply to one woman who accused him of this, reminding her that he participated in the civil rights movement, and that he was there when Harlem was burned by violence.
  • True Blood plays with this trope in later seasons:
    • In season 2, Mary Ann Forrester and her dirt-eating revelers are often positioned in direct contrast with the more "refined" vampires, particularly with Queen Sophie Ann.
    • Season 3 appears to be going for the full-on war: Sam's birth family are portrayed as "trashy", sitting around shirtless drinking beer in the middle of the day. Promos show the Were community as Badass Bikers, contrasted with the King of Mississippi's "equestrian toffs" aesthetic.
  • In Red Dwarf we have Rimmer, who keeps his underpants on coathangers, and Lister, who, well...
    Lister: No way are these my boxer shorts! These bend?
  • Middle-class snob Thelma and working-class reverse-snob Terry in Whatever Happened to The Likely Lads?, with poor, working-class-with-asperations Bob caught in the middle.
  • Steptoe And Son pitted the unreconstructed slobbishness of Albert Steptoe against the aspirational snobbishness of his son Harold.
  • Keeping Up Appearances is another, even better Brit Com example, with social-climbing übersnob Hyacinth contending with her gleefully slobby sisters.
  • long-running Dramedy Heartbeat has this, with Greengrass, David, Aunt Peggy and Vernon Scripps on one side and Trisha Penrose and the various past and present members of the local constabulary and medical profession in the other
  • In The Cape Scales, a lower-class British smuggler, gets into a feud with the villain Chess partially because he feels Chess and his business associates are looking down on him.
  • Star Trek: The Next Generation:
    • Inverted throughout the series with Starfleet (Snobs) vs. Klingons (Slobs).
    • The episode "Up the Long Ladder" is based on the trope.
  • Babylon 5:
    • Centauri are snobs, Narn are slobs.
    • Among the Minbari, the Religious Caste are always snobs, the Worker Caste are always slobs, and the Warrior Caste are seen as slobs by the Religious Caste and the position of the Worker Caste is unknown because they never show its POV.
  • The short-lived ABC sitcom It's All Relative centered around the conflict between two sets of in-laws, one a blue-collar Irish Catholic couple and the other a pair of well-heeled gay professionals.
  • Yes Dear had a bit of this, with uptight yuppies Greg and Kim contrasted with the more laid-back and downscale Jimmy and Christina.
  • The middle and later seasons of M*A*S*H had this when Charles Emerson Winchester III, a Boston blue-blood with a Harvard education, arrived at the 4077th.
  • Dharma and Greg had Dharma and her hippie parents frequently butting heads with Greg's rich WASP parents.
  • Happens most of the time in soap operas especially in the Philippines and a few other countries. A slob, usually depicted as belonging from a poor or impoverished family, would be oppressed and bullied at by a couple snobs, sharply dressed and speaking in a stereotypically "conyo" vernacular. A dozen slapping, hair-pulling and ranting scenes later, and the formerly-oppressed would eventually find his/her way and be introduced into high society, but not without a dozen more rounds until either the slob ends up seeing the snob getting killed by his/her own foolishness or jailed, or the snob reforms and makes amends with the person(s) he used to bully. The masses are used to it and are glued to watching Mara slap Clara, but some find either cliche, repetitive and detrimental. Naming each and every Latin American and Filipino drama serial that conforms to this would end up in a Wall of Text of sorts, but Annaliza, the aforementioned Mara Clara and Marimar are classic examples of this.
  • In Firefly there is the refined, upper class Simon Tam who is forced onto a space ship full of outlaws while running from the law. One of the subplots has Simon trying to adjust to living with the "slobs" and especially his conflict with barbaric and uneducated Jayne. This serves to illustrate the rift between the polished, hi-tech core worlds and scruffy, wild-west rim worlds.
  • Parodied in an episode of Mr. Show in which a sketch about Buddhist monks suddenly warps into a slobs-versus-snobs Olympiad between the monks and rich kids from a neighboring fat camp.
  • Greek: Kappa Tau (slobs) vs. Omega Chi (snobs).
  • The Vampire Diaries, with a single notable familial exception ( the Lockwoods), portrays the Fur Against Fang fight as this.
  • The Tates and the Campbells of Soap.
  • In Parks and Recreation the main characters live in the city of Pawnee (slobs). Pawnee has a rivalry with the neighboring city of Eagleton (snobs), which was actually formed when all the rich people of Pawnee took their money and fled the city.
  • The source of much of the comedy in George and Mildred, with the decidedly lower class Ropers moving in next door to snobbish Fourmiles.
  • Jerry and Newman from Seinfeld. Jerry's a successful and well-paid comedian who's known for his fastidiousness, while Newman's a slovenly postman who's so unhygienic he actually carries fleas. Their thinly disguised contempt for one another is one of the show's trademarks.
  • Subverted on Starsky & Hutch. The clash between Hutch's well-educated, sophisticated, refined, intellectual tastes and opinions and Starsky's uneducated, unsophisticated, lower-class, rougher ones is a longstanding running argument between them. Also, Starsky generally wears faded, skimpy jeans and a tattered brown leather jacket ancient enough to have been around since World War II, while Hutch usually looks like he just stepped off the cover of GQ. However, Starsky keeps a scrupulously clean apartment and a sleek, meticulously well-maintained car; while Hutch's apartment is in a state of perpetual untidiness and he drives a dilapidated, hideous old junker whose backseat is always crammed with a huge amount of trash, ranging from empty yogurt cups to random giant wooden wheels, which Starsky frequently bemoans.
  • Subverted on Trailer Park Boys in that most of the protagonists and antagonists were all residents of the same trailer park, or at least closely connected to it. People with more education and income were usually either impartial observers, such as the documentary film crew, or victims of the main characters' criminal schemes.
  • Upper Middle Bogan has the bogan Wheelers and the upper-middle-class Margaret Denyar, with their daughter (adopted by the latter) Bess trying to make them get along, with some degree of success.
  • Margaux Kramer on Punky Brewster, refers to the other kids as "peasants."

    Music 
  • "Respectable Street" by XTC.
  • "The Eton Rifles" by The Jam. Paul Weller was inspired to write the song by an incident in Slough, where Eton College cadets heckled a Right To Work protest march. The protesters, thinking they could put 'posh schoolboys' in their place, were provoked into physical violence against the cadets, only to be outclassed by the cadets' military training.
  • "Whatareya" by This Is Serious Mum (which translates the trope name into Australian as "Yobbos" and "Wankers"
  • Shows up in rival subcultures: Punk (slobs) vs metal (snobs), rockers (slobs) vs mods (snobs), and so on.

    Theater 
  • A Streetcar Named Desire, with southern belle Blanche vs. working man Stanley. At first, Stanley looks like a figure of liberty, but then we see that he has an insane obsession with bringing everyone down to his level.
  • Our American Cousin, the play Abraham Lincoln was watching when he was shot, was an early example, featuring a boorish American who has to meet with his snooty aristocratic British relatives to claim an inheritance.
  • The New Zealand play Foreskin's Lament, where the main character, a non-conformist liberal, has to deal with his reactionary rugby-mad mates.

    Tabletop Games 
  • This is the dynamic between the Orks and Eldar in Warhammer 40,000. The Orks use Cockney Funetik Aksents, the Eldar use Spock Speak. The Orks have bombastic Boisterous Bruiser personalities, the Eldar are The Stoic. The Orks wield gritty, oversized choppas and shootas, the Eldar wield sleek, advanced-looking weapons such as shuriken catapults and power swords. The Orks ride smoke-belching and garishly-decorated trucks and buggies note , the Eldar use skimmers with organic curves. The Orks wear leather jackets and Improvised Armour, the Eldar wear colourful Badass Longrobes and ornate body armour. The Orks view the Eldar as pansies, the Eldar view the Orks as vermin. Taken further in Dawn of War, due to the dialogue between the two. Heck, Kaptin Bluddflag of Dawn of War II: Retribution even refers to Eldar as "posh little runts".

    Video Games 
  • Wario (slob) VS Count Cannoli and Carpaccio (snobs) in Wario: Master of Disguise.
  • The rivalry between Half-Life's Black Mesa Research Facility, who generally behave like legitimate scientists, and Portal's Aperture Science, who, in the words of their founder, are "just throwing science at the wall and seeing what sticks". Though aesthetically Aperture's clean white Apple-esque everything look plays the snob while Black Mesa's actual science-going-on look plays the slob. In the older areas of Aperture seen in Portal 2, we see that they designed according to whatever looked "cool" for the given time period.
  • Startopia: Although mostly unseen, certain races don't get along. For example, Salt hogs, who prefer to work when possible and sleep, eat, bathe when needed, can get into arguments with gem slugs who prefer the most exotic of foods and luxury hotels on your station.
  • EverQuest and EverQuest II:
    • The Erudites, a race of evolved humans who's society revolves around science, magic, and magic in the pursuit of science. Compared to the Erudites, any race (excluding possibly the high elves) could qualify as slobs. The Erudites share an intense racial hatred with the Kerrans, a race of ancestor-worshipping shamanistic cat people who consider the Erudites to be psychotic, soulless mutants.
    • Although High Elves and Wood Elves generally get along fairly well, this comes to play in their relationship. High Elves think the Wood Elves lack proper elven dignity and morality, and Wood Elves think that High Elves are too haughty and self-righteous.
    • On the evil side of things, this comes into play with most evil races. Dark elves and Arasai play the snobs and see all the other evil races as savage brutes to be manipulated, or worthless sneaks. Iksar view themselves as the snobs, looking down on dark elves and arasai for being decadent and the others for being savages or sneaks. Likewise, Ratonga and Gnomes view themselves as the snobs, looking down on the others as big oafs who aren't as smart as they think they are. Ogres and Trolls, however, consider themselves the slobs and are damn proud of it.
  • Fire Emblem:
    • Classism has always been an element in play, but the Tellius duology magnifies it. The beorc are a race who focus on knowledge and invention, while the laguz focus on brute strength. This racial divide is so steep that they might even attack each other on sight. The laguz are shown in a far more sympathetic light, for the most part, with the racist beorc townspeople often ending up dead.
    • Amongst the beorc, there is this issue as well, with Ike and nobility sharing mutual dislike of each other. In order to command the Crimean army to save the kingdom, Ike reluctantly accepts peerage but after the kingdom is won, he says he only will stick around until everything is settled, and he renounces his title in the time between the two games.

    Visual Novels 
  • There's an example in Fatal Hearts that is unusual for this trope because it portrays both slobs and snobs sympathetically. The werewolves are the "slobs" and the vampires are the "snobs". Here's why they're both sympathetic: The vampires constantly look down on the werewolves and/or the masses in general and sometimes treat them badly, so the werewolves have good reason to dislike them. The vampires tend to look on life from a lofty perch and they don't care who gets cast aside as collateral damage. But the vampires' behavior has a good reason behind it at least where the werewolves are concerned, because while the werewolves are egalitarian with no classes, they're also excessively violent and tend to solve problems by committing murders, including the murder of a woman whose husband wasn't even a vampire yet, and if they got their way, art and education would completely disappear, since the werewolves have no personal use for it, thus making the vampires' elitism partially justified since it allows them to preserve the best of civilization.

    Web Comics 
  • This is the biggest source of conflict in Drowtales. The Sharen and several other established clans see their bloodlines as inherently superior to everyone else's, especially lowly upstart commoners like the Sarghress, and believe all should naturally serve under them as a matter of "destiny". The Sarghress believe everyone should have the chance to prove themselves and are willing to fight and kill to prove this.
  • Erfworld features a war between the ideals of Royalty and Toolism. The Royals are "descended" from the original units that the Titans left in charge. They go to great lengths to enforce their perceived superiority and tend to gang up on any non-royal that gains too much power. Stanely, meanwhile, believes that the Titanic Mandate has been transferred to those attuned to a set of artifacts called the Arkentools, and is set to destroy any side that refuses to acknowledge this.
  • One of the many problems between Gil and Tarvek in Girl Genius. Tarvek is a total snob, and sees Gil as a complete slob, thanks in part to a few overlapping adventures in Paris. Gil simply sees Tarvek as a priggish wet-blanket.
  • A religiously-themed example can be found in a Cockeyed Comix

    Web Original 

    Western Animation 
  • Spongebob Squarepants once fought a "cleanliness versus sloppiness" war with Patrick.
  • In the Avatar: The Last Airbender episode "The Great Divide", the neat and snobbish Gan Jin tribe had a long-standing feud with the slobbish Zhang, stemming from a single massive misunderstanding (the misunderstanding which was later revealed to be a fabrication Aang made up to mend the relationship between the two tribes). The clean/dirty issue was just an expression of their feud; in fact, it's possible they became clean and dirty to distinguish themselves from each other. ("Gan Jing" is Mandarin for "clean" and "Zhang" is Mandarin for "dirty", which makes the tribe names somewhat less than imaginative.) This rivalry caused problems when the two groups had to cross a huge canyon together.
  • In the Sequel Series The Legend of Korra, this is the main, if simplified, cause of strife between the Southern (the Slobs) and the Northern (the Snobs) Water Tribes.
  • The Simpsons:
    • The episode "A Tale of Two Springfields" had Homer divide the town in such a feud...because half the town's phone numbers had a new area code. (The "rich" part of town kept the old area code while the rest had to learn a new one.) Then the people in Homers side soon went to the other side of town because they were low on supplies, and only the Simpsons were left.
    • This trope was portrayed inconsistently in the case of the "Springfield versus Shelbyville" ongoing town rivalry. In the relatively early episode "Lemon of Troy," it is revealed that the current inhabitants of Springfield are descended from wholesome, all-American frontier stock (well, by the show's standards, anyway) while the Shelbyvillians are descended from a renegade band of pioneers who broke off from Jebediah Springfield's party because he would not allow them to practice cousin marriage; the "inevitable" result is that the modern-day Springfieldians are normal (again, by the show's standards) and the Shelbyvillians are inbred hillbillies who view the Springfieldians as over-civilized weaklings. But in the much later episode "The Seven Beer Snitch," the stereotypes are reversed and now the suddenly "sophisticated" Shelbyvillians scorn the Springfieldians for being "uncultured" and stupid. (The fact that all of the show's stereotypes had been ratcheted Up to Eleven by that point certainly didn't help the confusion.)
    • All very much a case of Springfield Geography, considering that Cletus Spuckle and his family appear to be local résidents.
    • They Saved Lisa's Brain could also count, but that's more 'The smart people of Springfield vs. the idiots of Springfield'.
  • The entire premise of The Oblongs was this, with the dirty (and physically deformed) Valley at odds with the wealthy and immaculate Hills.
  • Codename: Kids Next Door: The Kids Next Door are the heroic slobs; the Delightful Children from Down the Lane are the villainous snobs (raised by the even more snobbish Father and Grandfather).
  • My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic:
    • Applejack and Rarity had a feud like this that lasted most of episode MLP: Friendship Is Magic S1 E8 "Look Before You Sleep" "Look Before You Sleep"]], though the two are still somewhat at odds with one another. This comes back in a later episode, "Simple Ways" where Rarity wants to be a slob to impress a guy who falls for Applejack's unrefined charm. Applejack in turn acts like a snob to try and snap her out of it.
    • The Ponyvillians in general when contrasted with the Canterlot elite. The Canterlot Elite are usually presented as stuck-up jerks with no redeeming features contrasting our Fish out of Water heroes who are well meaning. Ironically, they also embody the destructive aspects too, as while the Canterlot elite might make you feel bad or unwelcome, the Ponyvillians have completely trashed two major national events.
  • Camp Lazlo has the rivalry between the Bean Scouts (Slobs) and the Squirrel Scouts (Snobs).
  • Monster High did this in the Fright On special: The Vampires were snobbish, being raised in more sophisticated lifestyles (of course Draculaura has been the ditzy underdog of the group). Meanwhile, the Werewolves were slobbish, with their more commoner type clothes and more animal-like behavior.
  • South Park:
    • They have this a fair bit. Interestingly, they are not afraid to depict the "slobs" in a negative light too, showing them as being just as capable of small-minded bigotry and terrible judgement.
    • The episode "Chickenpox" has Kyle's dad be insensitive to the plight of the poor, and ends up getting his ass handed to him by Kenny's dad. However, Kenny's dad is depicted as a small-minded, abusive drunk.
  • DePatie-Freleng's 1975 cartoon show The Oddball Couple, is a loose adaptation of The Odd Couple, with Spiffy (a neatnik cat) and Fleabag (a slovenly dog) in the Felix and Oscar roles.

    Real Life 
  • Mods (snobs) and Rockers (slobs) in 1960's England. The two warring subcultures were notable for unleashing moral panic by getting into some vicious public brawls.
  • In Mexico there's the Naco (slob) VS. Fresa (snob).
  • Gaming culture in general
    • Video games versus tabletop games, board games versus RPGs (and within that, Western-style RPGs vs. Japanese-style), paper and dice games versus card games, collectible card games versus 52-card games like poker and blackjack. Pick one and you'll see accuasations of "lazy" or "stuck up" and less less polite things.
    • This can be seen in the video gamer subculture: PC gamers sometimes stereotype console gamers as being immature and unsophisticated morons who aren't "real" gamers, while console gamers sometimes stereotype PC gamers as being pretentious jerks who care way too much about things like frames-per-second and processor speeds. As PCs are becoming cheaper and easier to set up, and consoles are becoming more powerful, the divide is lessening, but it's still there.
    • We also have the "Hardcore" vs. "Casual" debate, which can get a bit tricky depending on whom you sympathize with. Let's leave it at that.
  • Politicians across the spectrum love invoking this. Generally, the opposition is portrayed as a bunch of ignorant rabble lead by wealthy fat cats and/or ivory tower illuminati types. Again, let's leave it at that instead of trying to get more specific.


Riches To RagsPoverty TropesSlumming It
Serial KillerThis Index Means TroubleTroll
Simple Yet OpulentMoney TropesSlumming It
Silk Hiding SteelAn Index of Ladies and GentlemenWicked Cultured
Slippery Slope FallacyThe Only Righteous Index of FanaticsSlut Shaming
Slippery SoapNarrative DevicesSlow Clap
The Odd CoupleImageSource/Live-Action FilmsOffice Space

alternative title(s): Slobs Vs Snobs; Snobs Vs Slobs; Snobs Versus Slobs
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