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Sir Verb-A-Lot
In comedic medieval settings, a knight (usually one of the shining persuasion) will be introduced whose name sounds like "Sir Lancelot", only punnier. The "Lance" part will be replaced with a verb (often one that rhymes with "Lance", so "dance" and "prance" are common versions) and the "elot" with "a lot". Thus, we get a Meaningful Name which describes the knight's preferred activity. Note that spelling can vary (sometimes "elot" is left intact), but the punny meaning is always clear.

This is such a well-known trope that it has extended beyond this context, becoming a sort of "Stock Pun" used by characters, actual human beings and businesses who have nothing to do with knights.

Its roots in English legend make this Trope much more common in English-language and Western media. Obviously, being a comedic pun on the name of a fictional knight, it is in no way Truth in Television.

Examples:

Advertising
  • Sir Shakes-a-Lot the milkshake-loving knight from Burger King's "Burger King Kingdom" ads.
  • Spam have recently introduced a mascot named Sir Can-A-Lot. Not to be confused with Spamalot.

Comic Books
  • DC Comics COO Geoff Johns came up with an idea for a Masters of the Universe character named Sir Laser-Lot when he was eight years old. Many years later, he would enter the official canon in a DC comics series written by Johns himself, with an action figure following later (see Toys entry, below).

Film
  • In Stuart Saves His Family, Stuart wanted to enter a contest by naming a cleaning product mascot "Sir Cleans-A-Lot". His father then nicknamed him "Sir Eats-A-Lot".
  • Jumanji has a store called "Sir Save-A-Lot".

The Internet
  • www.sirlinksalot.net is a collection of web directories.
  • www.sirjogalot.com is a blog about jogging and running.

Literature

Live-Action TV
  • Sir Killalot the house robot from Robot Wars.
  • Whenever The Muppets do anything based on the Arthurian legends, or anything that takes place in a medieval/fantasy setting, nearly every other character they put up will be a play on this.
  • "The Storyteller" (actually Moriarty) tells a story about a knight named Sir Boast-a-Lot on his children's storytelling show in the Sherlock episode "The Reichenbach Fall". Sir Boast-a-Lot brags about going on epic quests and slaying dragons, but the other knights come to wonder if these stories are just lies he tells to make himself look good. This is Foreshadowing for his plan: to utterly discredit Sherlock as an egomaniacal fraud.

Merchandise
  • Chef Boyardee's canned pasta product Sir Chomps-a-Lot.

Music
  • The musician Sir Mix-A-Lot. His use of this trope has been parodied by Robot Chicken (see below).
  • The name Sir Dance-A-Lot has been used by DJs and bands alike.

Newspaper Comics

Pinball
  • Medieval Madness has two of jousters with puns on Lancelot's name, but only "Sir Miss-A-Lot" qualifies here.

Professional Wrestling
  • In the service of an Incredibly Lame Pun: CHIKARA has featured a tag team made up of two guys in knight costumes, each of whom was named "Lance Steel," called Lancelot, or Lance-A-Lot.

Real Life

Tabletop RPG
  • Paranoia supplement Acute Paranoia. One of the new secret societies in the book was the Knights of the Circular Object, which was partially inspired by the tales of King Arthur. One alias taken by a member of the society was "Sir Lanceabot".

Theme Parks
  • At Disneyland, there is a suit of armor on the Mr. Toad ride labeled "Sir Clinks-a-Lot." There are also non-knightly examples: an animatronic Indian that waves at the riverboat is informally called Chief Waves-a-Lot, and elsewhere in the park are two "cigar store Indian" sculptures sometimes referred to as Chief Stands-a-Lot and Chief Leans-a-Lot.

Toys
  • Sir Prance-A-Lot is one of those soft toys for babies with different parts with different textures and sounds.
  • As part of the Masters of the Universe line's 30th anniversary in 2012, an action figure based on a design Geoff Jons came up with when he was eight years old and dubbed Sir Laser-lot is to be released by Mattel.

TV Tropes

Video Games
  • Anders from Dragon Age: Origins used to have a cat named Ser Pounce-a-Lot.
  • The Sims 2 has a "pet brick" called "Sir Bricks-a-lot".
  • The Jump Start games have an anthropomorphic rabbit named Mr. (not sir, funnily enough) Hopsalot as a main character.
  • In ''Dragon Fable" all of the Pactagonal Knights follow this theme, ranging from Sir Jun and Sir Prise to Sir Loin.
  • Pac-Man World Rally (a Mario Kart clone) has a secret weapon called "Sir Pac-a-Lot".

Webcomics
  • Invoked in an Arthur, King of Time and Space strip:
    Lancelot: My mother wanted me to join the priesthood.
    Arthur: Then she ought to have named you Praysalot.
  • When Durkon's armour alerts enemies to the team's presence in one The Order of the Stick strip, Greenhilt takes to calling him Sir Clanksalot.
  • In one Bug strip, one character responds to hearing the baby crying with the line "Hark. Sir Poops-a-lot requests an audience."
  • A secondary character in The B-Movie Comic is Sir Lostalot, an archaeologist.
  • Lit Brick: During the Canterbury Tales storyline, the rapist knight of the Wife of Bath's tale is referred to as "Sir Rapesalot", because he didn't have a name in the source material.

Western Animation
  • In one episode of Animaniacs, Yakko, Wakko and Dot are given the titles "Sir Yaks-A-Lot", "Sir Waks-A-Lot" and "Lady Dots-A-Lot".
  • "Sir Pantsalot of Dropseat Manor" in the Looney Tunes short "Knights Must Fall".
  • One Robot Chicken skit actually features Sir Mix-A-Lot as a member of King Arthur's court. He's the one who suggests the concept of the Round Table, via the song "Table Be Round" (a parody of "Baby Got Back").
  • From the SpongeBob SquarePants episode "My Pretty Seahorse", after the customers at the Krusty Krab are complaining about their food not being brought to them;
    Squidward: Why don't you ask Cowbob Ranchpants and his faithful companion, Sir Eats-A-Lot?
    Mr. Krabs: SpongeBob! What's with all the nicknames!?!?
  • The hero of the children's animated television series The Adventures Of Sir Prancelot. External link.
  • After they are transported to the middle ages. Timmy Turner proclaims that they're in the middle ages, and Cosmo calls him "Sir Points-Out-The-Obvious-A-Lot.
  • There was an episode of The Book Of Pooh, where Pooh, Piglet, Rabbit, and Tigger decided to become 'The Knights of the Roundish Table', after Owl read them the story of King Arthur and his Knights of the Round Table. Tigger became Sir Bounce-A-Lot, Piglet became Sir Piglet Of Small, Pooh became Sir Pooh-cival, and Rabbit became Sir Hairyhead.
  • The mascot pig kidnapped by Homer and his roommates in the Simpsons episode "Homer Goes to College" is named Sir Oinks-A-Lot.
  • An episode of Beetle Juice had B.J. and Lydia get lost and meet Sir Lost-A-Lot, ruler of Camelost.
  • The Proud Family has a rapper named Sir Paid A Lot.
  • In the Bob the Builder feature length video The Knights of Can-A-Lot, all the machines take Sir Verbalot names when they pretend to be knights.
  • One episode of Totally Spies! has Clover commenting that going on a mission is "better than quality with nanny yells-a-lot".
  • Queen Delightful on The 7D has a pet dog named Sir Yipsalot.

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