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Rule-Breaker Rule-Namer
A rule or regulation is mentioned, and somebody pipes up that it's also known as "The (insert name) rule". For instance, let's say the scene is at a bar:

"Sorry, we don't let people prepare their own drinks. We had a couple of mishaps in the past with that, so management told us to stop it. We like to think of it as 'The Jack Jenkins Rule'".

Occasionally, when mentioning it, the speaker will look at the character in question glaringly (if he or she is nearby). If the rule is sufficiently strange, this doubles as a Noodle Incident, and if it's sufficiently specific, it overlaps with Strange Minds Think Alike.

Things merely named after the person who created or requested them don't count; it needs to be created in reaction to the person it's named after.

Examples:

    open/close all folders 

    Literature 

  • In Animorphs, the Andalite version of the Prime Directive is called the Law of Seerow's Kindness, after the Andalite who gave technology to the race that went on to use it to become the Big Bads of the series.
  • The Honerverse's Eridani Edict, preventing the use of a Colony Drop without first giving the planet a chance to surrender, is named after the world of Epsilon Eridani, which was leveled by such an attack.

    Live Action TV 

  • On "Home Improvement" a rule limiting the amount of Christmas lights and electricity used in the neighborhood decorating contest was known as the "Tim Taylor Rule"
  • On Married... with Children the male strip clubs have a "Peggy Bundy Rule" forbidding women from going in the back room with dancers.

    Web Original 

    Western Animation 

  • The supervillain guild on The Venture Bros. has a number of hostage-related regulations named after Doctor Venture, since he was constantly getting kidnapped as a boy hero.

    Real Life 

  • A Real Life example from the world of sports: The National Football League has numerous rules commonly (if unofficially) named after individual players. The "Emmitt Smith Rule", to give one example, prohibits a player from removing his helmet on the field while the game clock is running. Its name derives from the former Dallas Cowboys running back's predilection for throwing off his helmet after scoring touchdowns.
  • The Directors Guild of America reserves the right to slap a producer with a huge fine if he fires a DGA-affiliated director and replaces him with a current member of the cast or crew. They call this the "Eastwood Rule," after Clint Eastwood's behavior while making The Outlaw Josey Wales.
  • A Real Life commodities exchange rule designed to prevent investors from getting ruined by sudden massive changes in commodity prices as happened in Trading Places is known as the "Eddie Murphy" Rule.
  • In Cricket to "Mankad" is for the bowler to run out the non-striker batsman while they are backing up, after Vinoo Mankad of India, who did this to Australian Bill Brown in 1947. While not illegal, such an act is considered unsportsmanlike by many and likely to be highly controversial.
  • In Rugby League, John Hopoate became infamous after it was revealed that, when tackled, he had a habit of causing the tackler to loosen his grip by sticking his fingers into their rectum. "Hopoate" became Australian slang for such an act.
  • In 2008, an Ice Hockey player named Sean Avery spent a substantial amount of time waving his hands in the opposing goaltender's face and generally being a pest to him, eventually leading to a goal. This move wasn't technically against the rules at the time. Less than a day later, the league amended the rule so that if another player tries it, he can get a penalty. No prizes for guessing what the rule is (informally) called...
  • The National Hockey League had once had a huge problem with the Edmonton Oilers: they would send out any unimportant player to intentionally get offsetting minors with their opponent. This would set up a 4 on 4 situation, where the Oilers could send out their top line run by Wayne Gretzky. The combination would typically dominate any line they came up against. To prevent this from getting out of hand, the "Wayne Gretzky rule" was introduced, where offsetting minors were played in a 5 on 5 situation. Interestingly, the rule was revoked later.
  • An exception in the National Basketball Association's salary cap exists called the "Larry Bird exception", after Larry Bird being the first player re-signed under a rule where teams could exceed the salary cap to re-sign their own players. Two other variations exist, the "non-Bird exception", and the much punnier "Early Bird exception", which, as the name suggests, applies to certain players in free agency who were early in their career with a team.

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alternative title(s): Skippy Rules
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