Practical Voice-Over

A sequence needs explaining and the writer has chosen not to go to a voice-over, but has inserted good cause for someone to narrate the action. A television or radio reporter's voice is used, in some cases. This also serves to give the action some scope, making it clear that this is important stuff.

When played for laughs, this is Kent Brockman News. See also Mr. Exposition and Coincidental Broadcast.

Examples:

Film
  • Sports-themed films typically include snippets of a radio or television play-by-play announcer describing the action in the Big Game.
  • Used extensively in the film Apollo 13 as the crew's plight was a major news item at the time, with former CBS News Anchor Walter Cronkite providing the opening narration, which was in the form of a new clip (confirmed by director Ron Howard in the DVD commentary) and archive footage of actual news breaks was mixed in with scripted ones throughout the film.
  • Some of the exposition in the 2000 Hamlet, which is set in the corporate world, gets handed to a business news reporter.

Live-Action TV
  • The opening sequence of the War of the Worlds: The Second Invasion television series: "There's rioting breaking out from the city...fire is continuing to burn everywhere, troops are shooting people...there are conflicting reports about who or what started the chaos. Will some one tell me what's happening? This is madness! What is this world coming to?"
    • This may have been inspired by the most (in)famous production of War of the Worlds in history: The radio broadcast, done as though it were a breaking news story, which many listeners thought was really happening.

Web Original
  • Used at the beginning and end of The Flying Man to narrate the Flying Man's appearance and Mike's fate.

Western Animation


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