Paranormal Mundane Item

When one speaks of items with mystical properties, it is commonly assumed that they look antiquated enough, bearing associations with either ancient civilizations, the Middle Ages or some other time period no later than late 19-early 20 century (like magical staffs, manuscripts, mirrors, potions, etc.). This trope, instead, is about paranormal items that look like they were bought in a shop nearby. They would usually be labeled with either an unfamiliar trademark or a familiar trademark with a strangely altered label. For example, it may be a chocolate bar which would transform you into a monster if you eat it or a video game cartridge that would teleport you into the game's realm as soon as you put it into your console.

Such items can often be found in Urban Fantasy, may be used by a Blue-Collar Warlock, and are frequently sold in a Little Shop That Wasnt There Yesterday. Often overlaps with May Contain Evil; also compare Haunted Technology.

Examples

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    Literature 
  • The Goosebumps series have lots of those:
    • Full Moon Fever has chocolate bars called "Best" (actually "Beast"; turns people into werewolves) and "Cure" (actually "Curse"; makes people shrink in size) that look like your everyday shop merchandise.
    • The Monster Blood from the eponymous book is a jar of weird green substance that looks like children's slime toys, but has very creepy magical properties.
    • Beware of the Purple Peanut Butter has the titular purple butter that makes you shrink, and a piece of cake that makes you grow in size.
    • In Shop Till You Drop ... Dead!, the protagonists are on a Scavenger Hunt to find a number of items in a night department store. Goods found in this store include among the rest a Heart-Attack Backpack that suffocates people until they have a heart attack, and a toy ape that comes to life at night.
  • In Scream Shop series by Tracey West, Sebastian Cream's Curiosity Shop specializes in selling such objects. One of the notable examples from The Curse of Count Blood is a vial with the symbol of a comic book character which turns out to be a tool for resurrecting staked vampires. Of course, as the main character quickly finds out, in his world Comic Books Are Real...
  • Robert Sheckley's "Fishing Season" centers around food items that look very similar to usual grocery products, but have some strange minor differences. They actually serve as a "bait" for humans, and those who eat them are sucked into another world.

    Live Action TV 
  • Warehouse 13 involves many items that may have been run-of-the-mill when they were first made, but because they were owned by historically important people they ended up obtaining paranormal powers (or maybe the historically important people became such because they have paranormal powers; the series is glad to leave either option in the air).
  • The Objects in The Lost Room are perfectly ordinary-seeming items with bizarre and unintuitive powers, like a comb that can stop time, a canteen that causes everyone nearby except its holder to asphyxiate, and a pair of scissors that forcibly turns whatever they point at around any axis. They were originally entirely mundane items that were part of a man's luggage within the titular room when a mysterious Event transformed them, and they have since been disseminated around the world as people fought over them. The Objects are also indestructible, except when inside the Room itself.
  • Friday the 13th: The Series revolves around the objects of a certain store that held paranormal properties (and some of them were quite modern-looking, like a radio), but all of them were a pretty vile Power at a Price (as an example: a crucifix that allowed even people who knew nothing of spiritism to perform exorcisms, but had to be fed human blood (and that meant stabbing people dead with it)).

    Video Games 
  • Sam & Max: The Devil's Playhouse centers around the mystical Toys of Power which are actually very ancient, but for some reason look like ordinary toys that may be found in a modern-day toy shop (like a toy telephone that allows its user to teleport and a wacky putty toy that gives him the ability of transformation).

    Web Original 
  • Whateley Universe: Ms. Grimes's reliquary (storage device for magical energy) is a bowling ball bag.
  • SCP Foundation: A decent number of artifacts contained by the Foundation bear some resemblance to some form of product intended to be sold to the public, to the detriment of anyone unfortunate enough to find one. In addition, there are a number of organizations of interest that specialize in the production and or sale of such artifacts.

    Western Animation 

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/ParanormalMundaneItem