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Mister Strange Noun
Characters with arbitrary, improbable words as their Only One Name.

If the word is a Meaningful Name, it's Mister Descriptor. See also Luke Nounverber.

Not to be confused with Doctor Strangelove.


Examples:

Comic Books
  • Half of the characters in The Amazing Screw-On Head fit this formula, and the other half seems to: the titular Mr. Head, his former manservant Mr. Manifold turned archnemesis Emperor Mr. Zombie, and his new manservant Mr. Groin.

Film

Literature
  • In The Truth, Mr. Pin and Mr. Tulip, Those Two Bad Guys.
  • Even moreso in Thief of Time when the auditors decide that their names shall be Mr./Mrs. <insert colour here> and hundreds show up all demanding unique names.
  • The Spookshow in American Gods use this. And are mocked for it.
    "Do you guys just see things and pick names? 'Oh, you be Mister Sidewalk, he's Mister Carpet, say hello to Mister Airplane'?"
  • The Great Gatsby has a section that's mainly a Long List of people who have visited Gatsby's house, many of them named unflatteringly in this style.
  • Mrs. Who, Mrs. What and Mrs. Which in A Wrinkle in Time. Justified in that they're not quite human.
  • The Undertaking in Kim Newman's Diogenes Club stories, an Edwardian version of the Men in Black, has agents with names like Mr. Hay and Mr. Bee, continuing down at least as far as Mr. Eggs.
  • The Witchfinder Army in Good Omens employs a long list of these. Justified in that none of them actually exist and are merely Line-of-Sight Names written on the payroll by Witchfinder General Shadwell, who is not known for his creativity, in order to get more pay then the Witchfinder Army's real 2-person roster warrants.

Live-Action TV
  • Mr. Bean.
  • Monty Python's Flying Circus, especially with the Pepperpots. There are a great many examples throughout the series' history.
    "Oh, hello, Mrs. Premise!"
    "Hello, Mrs. Conclusion!"
  • A Bit of Fry and Laurie had a few, such as Mr. Smear.
  • Some of the fake reporters and interview subjects in Brass Eye, for example "Gypsum Fantastic" for a random slaughterhouse worker in the "Animals" episode.
  • The Doctor Who story "The Pirate Planet" comes close with Mr. Fibuli, which is one letter away from "fibula" (an Ancient Roman ornamental toga-fastening pin).
  • Nurse Unloop from The Kids in the Hall.

Music
  • Used by a lot of musicians. Mister Joker, Mr. Mister, Mr. Kite, Mister Monster, Mr. Leen, Mr. Bones, Mr. Gang, Mr. E...
  • In calypso, a common trend was for musicians to call themselves "Lord ____," starting with Lord Kitchener but moving into Strangenoun territory with Lord Beginner, Lord Invader and others. Many Carnival revelers took on high-faluting names, either to suggest nobility (as above), ferocity (Mighty Tiger), both (Black Stalin), and...well...whatever Red Plastic Bag was going for.

Video Games
  • The Masters of the Bazaar in Fallen London, whose names relate to their field of business: Mr Apples, Mr Iron, Mr Pages, Mr Stones (one of the few whose name wouldn't stand out too much on a census), Mr Veils, and several others.
    • There's also Mr Inch, who isn't one of the Masters but has a similar name.

Western Animation

Other
  • The men in black of UFO lore are known to call themselves such names.
  • Some of the names in Rowan Atkinson's routine with the teacher taking attendance. The clean version has people named Undermanager and Haemoglobin; the dirty version has Clitoris ("Where are you, Clitoris?") and Herpes.

Mister DescriptorNaming ConventionsMulti-Ethnic Name

alternative title(s): Mister Arbitrary
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