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Mathematician's Answer
aka: ptitle3zaap0y7ym6o
Monty: Dad, is there a word to describe answers that are completely correct but entirely useless under the circumstances?
Prof. Jones: Yes, yes there is.

If you ask someone a question, and he gives you an entirely accurate answer that is of no practical use whatsoever, he has just given you a Mathematician's Answer.

A common form of giving a Mathematician's Answer is to fully evaluate the logic of the question and give a logically correct answer. Such a response may prove confusing for someone who interpreted what they said colloquially.

Examples include questions involving "can you do [favor]...?" being interpreted as a hypothetical "are you capable of doing [favor]?" instead of its more common intent as a request to actually do it (this is a favorite of English teachers and Grammar Nazis, frequently going through something similar to "Can I come in?" "I don't know, can you?" "Uh, may I come in?") Another common form is when a character is asked "Is it A or B?" they will respond, "Yes" as if it was a question of Boolean logic rather than clarifying which specific one is the case (though this can also occur if the responder does not know the answer, or considers both answers correct. This crops up a lot in Real Life, especially in the world of computers.) A third variant is when a question beginning with "How" (being asked in the sense of "By what means does X occur?") is answered with an adverb or adverbial phrase (responding as if the question had been "In what manner does X occur?"). For example: "How did you get past the guards?" "With difficulty."

Can be used by characters for reasons ranging from snarky humor to intentional obfuscation to being extremely Literal-Minded — AI and other Literal Genies by their nature are very likely to fall into the last category.

Can overlap with Shaped Like Itself when the question is seeking a description, and with Captain Obvious, as these answers tend to be self-evident for anyone with a brain. Usually doubles as a Cryptically Unhelpful Answer, when the "mathematician" is deliberately trying to confound the questioner. Compare Non-Answer, which is a vague "answer" which does not answer the question at all. Mildly related to What's a Henway? and Not Actually The Ultimate Question. And don't forget that the person giving the Mathematician's Answer is "technically correct... the best kind of correct."

The trope name comes from a family of jokes about the supposed habit of mathematicians to make unhelpful answers. For example: a man in a hot-air balloon asked someone where he was. "You're in a balloon," he answered. The rider concluded that it was a mathematician that said that, because the answer was perfectly correct and completely useless. (The joke sometimes continues with the mathematician deducing the man in the balloon is a manager, because he has risen to his position with a lot of hot air, has no idea where he is or where he is going, and yet claims this is the fault of the innocent person standing below him.)

All of Them is a subtrope that's its own Stock Phrase. See also What's a Henway?. Contrast Implied Answer when the question isn't answered at all, and the meaning is quite clear.

Compare with Non-Answer.


Examples

    open/close all folders 

    Advertising 
  • A commercial for Lyrica begins with a voiceover along the lines of: "I was wondering why I had muscle pain, so I asked my doctor. It turns out, connected to muscles are nerves which send pain messages to the brain."
    • Also a Captain Obvious moment. "Nerves send pain messages to the brain?! Noooo!"
    • This may be a rare example of an unintentional Mathematician's Answer. The idea could be to inform the audience that pain doesn't just exist in the pained part of the body, and that not all treatment of pain actually has to directly affect the pained part (something which may seem obvious to most people — especially if you know about phantom pain — but not to everyone).
  • A beer commercial has a guy describe something as beautiful, refreshing, etc. as he grabs a beer near a woman. The woman asks him if he's describing the beer or her; his reply is, "Yes."
  • A commercial for Grey Poupon mustard has one Rolls-Royce pull up to another, and they both roll down their windows. One man asks, "Pardon me, do you have any Grey Poupon?" The other replies, "But of course!" — then signals his chauffeur to drive away.
  • A Nike "Find Your Greatness" spot goes something like this: "Is it speed or endurance? Does it happen in two hours or four or six? Is it finishing strong or barely finishing? Yes." "It" is ostensibly greatness.
  • A Head & Shoulders ad in Spain opens with a dermatologist saying "When people ask me why dandruff comes back, I tell them about the boomerang effect: dandruff always comes back."
  • A series of ads for AT&T feature a man talking to young children. Here's one of the exchanges:
    Man: Are you competing for cutest kid right now?
    Girl: Yes.
    Man: What place are you in?
    Girl: Kindergarten.
    Man: That's adorable.
  • A board advertisement for McDonald's late-night menu has this gem: "Late dinner or breakfast? Yes."

    Anime and Manga 
  • Kenichi: The Mightiest Disciple example!
    Random guy on the beach: Hey, beautiful, where are you from?
    Shigure: My... home.
  • From the English dub of Lupin III:
    Lupin: Which direction do you think the helicopter will be coming from?
    Goemon: Up.
  • Rurouni Kenshin has one of these during the Jinchu Arc:
    Chou: So who are we goin' after? The Boss? Or Battousai?
    Saito: Yes.
  • Bleach:
    • A flashback shows Ryuuken telling Uryuu "I have no interest. You have no talent." when the pair discuss Ryuuken's Refusal of the Call. It leaves Uryuu thinking for years that Ryuuken has no Quincy power. In fact, Ryuuken wields incredible power but is refusing to use it for some reason.
    • Souken tells Uryuu that, when accounting for the fact Ryuuken has a family to raise, Ryuuken's claim there's no money in being a Quincy is true. What Uryuu asked was whether Ryuuken's comment, given in answer to Uryuu's question "why do you hate being a Quincy?", was a lie or the truth. Souken's answer is true from any angle - there is no money in being a Quincy regardless of whether that Quincy is a father or not - but completely useless for answering Uryuu's actual question.
  • Jonah in Jormungand is awful at math, so when he's basically asked 22 times 3 while the Logistics crew are at an airport, he answers "A bunch."

    Audio Play 
  • In I Think We're All Bozos on This Bus, when the Clem-clone asks "How are you, Doctor?" Dr. Memory replies in a flat monotone: "The Doctor is on."
  • In the Goon Show episode, "The Lost Emperor", young Neddie Seagoon is working in the Victoria and Albert Museum late at night when Moriarty and Grytpype come in and pull a gun on him.
    Grytpype: Draw the curtain Moriarty. Now then is there anyone else in the building apart from you?
    Seagoon: Yes, two others.
    Grytpype: What are they doing?
    Seagoon: Holding me up with a pistol.

    Comic Books 
  • From X-Statix: "He's... "connecting" in some way to what he's lost." "Is that a good or bad thing?" "Yes."
  • Lucky Luke's horse can speak, but seeing as it's a horse, even Lucky Luke is baffled when he sees it on the riverbank, fishing.
    Lucky Luke: How did you get the bait on the hook?
    Jolly Jumper: With disgust, just like everybody else.
  • In one Big Bang Comics story, the Quizmaster is trying to get the Knight Watchman to reveal his secret identity — by having him play 20 questions while hooked up to a lie detector, and killing his sidekick Kid Galahad if he lies! For his first question, he asks the Watchman whom he would be if he weren't wearing his costume. The Watchman replies "I can truthfully say that I would still be myself!"
    • The Watchman tries to give a similar answer to the question "Who is Kid Galahad, in reality?"; he manages to avoid the answer the Quizmaster wanted, but is forced to give away some information: "In all earnestness I'll have to tell you that he's really my nephew!" He had a similar smartass answer for the question "What are your secret identities?", but Kid Galahad escaped and took the Quizmaster out of commission before he could give it.
  • From Deadpool Vol. 2 #34:
    Deadpool: I just figured out how to kill this "Id" thing.
    Kak: How?
    Deadpool: With my brain. Duh.
  • In the Civil War issues of Amazing Spider-Man, Iron Man gives Spider-Man a lecture about using this kind of answer when dealing with lawyers, government entities, and other officials.
  • Suicide Squad #16
    Vixen: Where's the Colonel?
    Bronze Tiger: With Shade.
    Vixen: Where's Shade?
    Bronze Tiger: With the Colonel.
    Vixen: How zen.
  • In Part 7 of Sonic the Hedgehog/Mega Man: Worlds Collide, Orbot informs Drs. Eggman and Wily that they've lost Shadow Man:
    Dr. Eggman: Wait, my Shadow Man (the roboticized version of Shadow the Hedgehog) or your Shadow Man (the Mega Man 3 boss)?
    Orbot: Yes.
    (Dr. Eggman slaps Orbot)
  • In The Avengers and The Infinity Gauntlet, after The Mighty Thor points out how Hawkeye's arrows would be nothing more than an annoying trifle to the android that copied his Asgardian strength, Hawkeye tells Scarlet Witch to prepare a hex attack. When Wanda asks if he wanted her to attack the android or Thor, Hawkeye simply says "Yes."
  • In an issue of Animaniacs, Yakko takes things in this direction when he and his sibs are being interviewed on a TV talk show.
    Reporter: Can I talk to you first, Yakko?
    Yakko: I don't know, can you?
    Reporter: Uh, tell us about some of your outrageous exploits.
    Yakko: I don't have any ex-ploits. All of my ploits are still ploits!
    Reporter: No, no! Tell us what you've been doing.
  • In issue 3 of Loki Agent Of Asgard, when the title character appears at a speed-date dressed like his usual self, the woman sitting across from him asks if he's dressed for a con(vention). His response? "There's always a con going on somewhere."

    Fan Works 
  • A minor Running Gag of Yuki Nagato in Kyon Big Damn Hero (examples make much more sense in context):
    (Haruhi, Yuki and Kanae forcibly redress Kyon up into a costume)
    Kyon: Y...Yuki! Kanae-chan! Come on! H...help me- Waaah! Help me out!
    Yuki: I am helping.
    ...
    Kyon (upon waking up to find Yuki waking up in his bed): "Um... Good morning?"
    Yuki: "Yes."
    ...
    Haruhi: Now keep Kyon off me for a minute!
    (Yuki immobilizes Kyon out of sheer embarrassment by hugging him tightly)
    Haruhi: Done! (turns around, realization hits) Er, er, good work. Um, more emotion next time, Yuki, and then we'll have that sequel down solidly!
    Yuki: Good.
    Haruhi: That means you can let go!
    Yuki: Understood.
    Haruhi: That means let go!
  • Done nicely in this fanfic of The Dresden Files.
    Murphy: Okay, first case. We have several murders to get to.
    Dresden: Solving or causing?
    Murphy: (growling) Yes.
  • In Families, most of the answers the Keeper gives to Twilight are this. This is partially because she's not allowed to give straightforward answers, and partially because it's fun.
  • Turnabout Storm: After a ridiculously laconic testimony by one of the witnesses, Phoenix struggles to get any useful information out of her. When he asks her about what she was doing near the crime scene in the first place, the prosecution interrupts:
    Trixie: We already know what she was doing there. She was observing the crime.
  • A Posse Ad Esse, after Secret Weapon Dub gets himself in the shit:
    Dolly: Oh god, that's e'en worse. Dub, dae ye e'en remember whit ye are?
    Dub: Yeah, I'm a turtle.
  • In the RWBY fic Sailor RWBY, Ruby asks Weiss if she believes in Ruby as a leader. Weiss replies, "I believe that you have potential."
  • Tealove's Steamy Adventure uses this twice.
    • As Tealove wonders what her new traveling companion, Minty, is:
    "But what are you really?", asked Tealove. "Are you a ticket that can turn into a pony, or a pony that can turn into a ticket?"
    "Yes, exactly!"
    • In the cave troll's lair:
    Oaf? Oh, you mean the cave troll? the white pony said. Big Jim isnt an oaf! Hes a real sweetheart. You just have to try to understand him.
    GRUUUUUUUUUH, Big Jim said. He scratched his armpit.
    Okay, Tealove said. Help us understand him. What did he just say?
    The white pony thought carefully, then answered, He said, Gruh.

    Film, Animated 
  • The CGI film Bee Movie has a scene between a human woman and a talking bee:
    Vanessa: How did you learn to do that?
    Barry B. Benson: Do what?
    Vanessa: That, that... the talking thing?
    Barry B. Benson: Same way you did, I guess. Mama, dada, honey, you pick it up.
  • In Shrek the Third, Pinocchio has a very confusing one in order to not lie to Price Charming about where Shrek is. It involves Confusing Multiple Negatives.
  • In Mumfie's Quest, when the Secretary of Night asks for Mumfie's name, his answer is "Yes!". The Secretary asks what he means, and he says that he has a name, and gives the correct response.

    Film, Live Action 
  • Return of the Jedi: "R2! What are you doing here?... Well, I can see you're serving drinks..."
  • The Empire Strikes Back:
    C-3PO: Excuse me, sir. Might I inquire what's going on?
    Han Solo: Why not?
  • Grosse Pointe Blank: "I'm doin' a double shift, what's it look like?"
  • Airplane: Asked for his name and position, Ted answers, "Ted Stryker. I'm sitting down, facing forward, but that's not important right now."
  • Ghostbusters: "Where do these stairs go?"... "They go up."
  • In Its A Wonderful Life, George asks the pregnant Mary, "Is it a boy or a girl?" Mary just nods enthusiastically.
  • The Pink Panther
    • In the 2006 Steve Martin movie, a reporter asks Inspector Clouseau if they (the police) know if the killer is a man or a woman. Clouseau's answer is: "Well of course I know that! What else is there, a kitten?"
    • Also, when he quotes someone about politics, Yvette asks him if he said it, meaning if he is the original author of he quote. Clouseau takes the question literally and, after confusingly looking around for someone else, answers "yes."
    • In The Return of the Pink Panther, Clouseau doesn't know the location of his next destination, so he asks a person on the street "Do you know where X is?". The person answers "Yes" and keeps walking.
    • In The Pink Panther Strikes Again, Clouseau enters an inn, sees a dog, and asks the innkeeper if his dog bites. The answer he gets is technically correct...
    Clouseau: I thought you said he does not bite!
    Innkeeper: That is not my dog.
  • Apocalypse Now
    Willard: Do you know who's in command here?
    Roach: Yeah. [Walks off]
  • A particularly egregious example from Lucky Number Slevin:
    Slevin: I'm gonna say the same thing any man with two penises says when his tailor asks him if he dresses to the right or left.
    Lindsey: What's that?
    [cuts to The Boss's penthouse]
    Slevin: Yes.
  • Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan: Although in this case Kirk quickly makes it obvious that he's just joking around.
    Saavik: May I ask how you dealt with the test?
    Kirk: You may ask.
  • There's a fun Dennis Quaid moment in the underrated Undercover Blues, when he and his super-spy wife, Kathleen Turner, are deliberately being obfuscating to the local police:
    Lt. Sawyer: Oh, cute baby! Boy or girl?
    Jeff Blue: Gosh, I hope so!
  • A Hard Days Night: "How did you find America?" "Turn left at Greenland."
    • "Has success changed your life?" "Yes."
    • "Do you think these haircuts have come to stay?" "Well this one has, y'know, stuck on good and proper now."
    • "What do you call that hairstyle you're wearing?" "Arthur."
    • "What do you call that collar?" "A collar."
  • The A-Team:
    Sosa: Gilbert, you've either deliberately aided and abetted a federal fugitive's escape, or you're the single dumbest human being I've ever come into contact with. Would you like to know which way I'm leaning?
    Gilbert: Forward!
  • From Dusk Till Dawn:
    Kate: Where are we going?
    Richie: Mexico.
    Kate: What's in Mexico?
    Richie: Mexicans.
  • The Count of Monte Cristo: A rather dark variation
    Mondego: How...?
    Cristo: How did I escape? With difficulty. How did I plan this moment? With pleasure.
  • In the Marx Brothers' Duck Soup:
    Prosecuter: Chicolini, when were you born?
    Chico: I don't remember. I was only a little baby.
  • The Three Stooges were quite fond of this:
    • From "Shivering Sherlocks":
    Police Captain: Have you any visible means of support?
    Larry: Sure. I've got suspenders!
    • From "Don't Throw That Knife", practicing taking census:
    Moe: Where were you born, madam?
    Shemp: In the hospital.
    Moe: Hospital??
    Shemp: Yes, I wanted to be near my mother!
  • Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery, when Vanessa finds out just how Austin got plans from one of Dr. Evil's Femme Fatales.
    Vanessa: Did you use protection?
    Austin: Of course, I have a 9 millimeter automatic.
  • In the Our Gang short "School's Out" has several test answers taken from H.M. Walker's Vaudeville routine, many of which take this form.
    • "Donald Haines, where is Washington?" "First in war, first in peace, and third in the American League."
    • "Douglas Greer, what was Abraham Lincoln's mother's name?" "Mrs. Lincoln."
    • "Buddy O'Donald, on Paul Revere's night ride, what did he say as he stopped his horse in front of colonial homes?" "He said, 'Whoa!'"
    • "Bobby Malon, what was Nero doing while Rome burned?" "I don't know, but I think he should've been hauling water to the fire."
    • "Jackie Cooper, who was The Hunchback of Notre Dame?" "Lon Chaney."
  • Sleepy Hollow:
    Ichabod Crane: Katrina, why are you in my room?
    Katrina Van Tassel: Because it is yours.
  • When asked why he committed the eponymous crime in The Great Train Robbery, Sean Connery's character says "I wanted the money."
  • During an Obligatory War Crime Scene in Full Metal Jacket
    Joker: How can you shoot women and children?
    Door Gunner: Easy. You just don't lead 'em so much. (Laughing) Ain't war hell?
  • In "Sons of the Desert", Stan and Ollie wouldn't get back home until they came up with a cover story for an escapade. When interrogated by cops about their places of residence, Ollie claimed to live at home and Stan said he was Ollie's next door neighbor. Stan, being Stan, told a really useful answer later.
  • In Caddyshack, Ty Webb gives a good one to Judge Smails after explaining that he doesn't play golf competitively:
    Smails: Well, how do you measure yourself against the other golfers?
    Ty: By height.
  • At the beginning of Oceans Eleven, Danny Ocean is at his hearing to determine if he is fit to be released from prison.
    Male Examiner: You have a history of arrests, but you have never been successfully charged. Is there a particular reason you chose to commit this crime, or a reason you simply got caught this time?
    Danny: My wife left me. I fell into a self-destructive pattern.
    (beat)
    Female Examiner: If released, do you think you would fall into a similar pattern?
    Danny: She already left me once. I don't think she'd do it again just for kicks.
  • The Avengers gives us this gem: Tony forgets to factor in Steve's Fish out of Temporal Water issues while trying to fix the Helicarrier's busted engine, resulting in some sarcasm from Cap:
    Tony: (from inside rotor) Okay, tell me what you see!
    Steve: (staring at a bewilderingly high-tech panel) It seems to run on some form of electricity.
    Tony: Well, you're not wrong...
  • The American President
    • President Shepherd, concerned his daughter Lucy isn't doing as well in social studies as she should, gives her an old textbook of his:
      President Shepherd: Luce, take a look at this book. This is exciting stuff. It's about who we are and what we want. Read what it says on the first page.
      Lucy Shepherd: "Property of Gilmore Junior High School".
      President Shepherd: The next page, Luce.
    • A variation later in the movie, when Shepherd meets lobbyist Sydney Ellen Wade for the first time, and they're in his office:
      Sydney Ellen Wade: If you don't live up to the deal you just made, come New Hampshire, we're gonna go shopping for a new candidate. (walks toward the door)
      President Shepherd: You can't do that, Sydney.
      Sydney: With all due respect, Mr. President, who's gonna stop me?
      President Shepherd: Well, if you go through that door, the United States Secret Service. That's my private office. You need to go out that way.
  • In Eraser, after John Kruger falls out of a plane and lands in a junkyard, a kid who watched him fall comes up to him.
    Kruger: Where am I?
    Kid: Earth. Welcome.
  • Snatch had this memorable exchange:
    Customs Agent: Anything to declare?
    Avi: Yeah. Don't go to England.
  • La Strada
    Gelsomina: Where are you from?
    Zampan: My home town.
    Gelsomina: You don't talk like us. Where were you born?
    Zampan: My father's house.
  • Jurassic Park.
    Hammond: The attractions will be very popular with children.
    Grant: And what are those?
    Sattler: Small versions of adults, honey.
  • Big Trouble in Little China:
    Jack Burton: How did you get up there?
    Egg Shen: Wasn't easy!
  • Citizen Kane:
    Reporter: Mr. Kane, How did you find business conditions in Europe?
    Kane: With great difficulty!
  • The Hunger Games:
    Caesar Flickerman: So, Peeta, how are you finding the Capitol? And don't say "with a map".
  • Hot Fuzz has an example of an underaged drinker being far too clever for his own good.
    Nick Angel: When's your birthday?
    Kid: 22nd of February.
    Angel: What year?
    Kid: Every year.
    Angel: Get out.
  • In Sexy Beast, the powerful gayngster Teddy Bass attends an orgy and notices another man, Harry, giving him a certain look.
    Teddy: Men or women?
    Harry: Oh... definitely.
  • From a trailer for the 2014 film remake of Annie:
    Will Stacks (after saving Annie from getting hit by a car): Why do you run like that?
    Annie: Gets me places faster.
  • While having dinner at The Grand Budapest Hotel, Mr. Moustafa lists what the requirements were for being Monsieur Gustave's "personal guest." They had to be: rich, old, insecure, vain, superficial, blond, needy.
    Young Author: Why blond?
    Mr. Moustafa: Because they all were.
  • One of God's conditions in Bruce Almighty is "You can't mess with free will."
    Bruce: Uh-huh. (Beat) Can I ask why?
    God: (Gleefully) Yes, you can! That's the beauty of it!

    Jokes 
  • Three logicians walk into a bar. The bartender asks them, "Do you all want drinks?" The first says "I don't know," the second says "I don't know," the third says "Yes please."
  • In order to test their reactions to emergencies, a man lights a small, harmless fire outside each of the offices of three men: an engineer, a physicist, and a mathematician. First, the engineer sees his. He shrieks "Oh my God, a fire!" Then, he grabs a fire extinguisher and blasts the flames, putting the fire out completely but, in the process, damaging the office complex more than the fire could have possibly done. Next, the physicist sees his fire. He screams "Oh my God, a fire!" but then quickly calms down.Note  He walks up to the fire, measures it, goes to the lab to run some tests, runs a computer simulation, samples the carpet and tests it for flammability, and then returns with a test tube of just the right amount of water, which he pours in the exact right spot, extinguishing the fire without a trace. Finally, the mathematician sees his fire. He screams "Oh my God, a fire!" and runs back into his office. He races to his desk, grabs a box of matches, lights one, blows it out, then returns to work, satisfied that the problem can be solved.
    • A variant has the mathematician look at the fire, look at a bucket of water, then say with a satisfied nod, "A solution exists", and return to work.
    • On similar lines: An engineer, an applied mathematician and a pure mathematician are asked how to put out a burning house. The engineer replies 'pour water on the fire'. The applied mathematician replies 'calculate how much water is needed to put it out', and the pure mathematician replies 'first light a match and throw it through the window, to make sure it is on fire. Then ask the applied mathematician.'
    • A mathematician is given a kettle and asked to boil water. He fills it with water, plugs it in, and switches it on. He is then given the same task, but this time the kettle is already plugged in and full of water. He unplugs it and empties it, thus reducing it to a previously-solved problem.
    • A physicist, a biologist and a mathematican saw two men entering a house and three men getting out. The physicist said, "The measurements are not correct." The biologist said, "They have reproduced." The mathematician said, "If exactly one person enters the house it will be empty again."
  • According to a joke, a helicopter is lost in the fog and the pilot shows a sign to the people in the nearby skyscraper, asking them where he is. The answer: "You are in a helicopter." Ironically, the answer does prove useful, since a skyscraper filled with people who all play by this trope can only be the Microsoft tech support building.
    • A man goes up in a hot air balloon. After a while, he drifts away from the right grounds, becoming lost. He worries about his plight and decides that the best way to return to the balloon grounds is to ask the next person he sees. Finally, he spots a hiker. He calls down, "Hey, where am I?" She waits for a while as the balloon starts to drift away, staring up at him. She remains silent until he believes that she hasn't heard him, then she yells, "You're in a balloon moving at 3.2 knots NWW (failing to account for the cross-breeze, which is 0.07 knots SE and increasing). Accounting for Doppler distortion, you..."
      She goes on like this for several minutes. When she finishes the man yells down, "Hey, are you a mathematician?"
      "Yes," she replies. "How'd you know?"
      "Well, first of all, you took a while to answer. Furthermore, everything you said was absolutely correct. Lastly, it was all absolutely useless." He angrily continues to drift away.
      "Hey!" she yells.
      "What?!"
      "Are you in management?"
      He stares down in genuine surprise. "Yes. How'd you know?"
      "Well, you got to where you are on a balloon of hot air. You don't know where you are or where you're going. You expect the people below you to solve your problems. Even though everything I told you was correct, you have no idea how to use it. Finally, even though your situation hasn't changed in the slightest, somehow you believe it's become my freaking fault!"
    • The tech people have their own version of this joke:
    Man in helicopter: Excuse me, where am I?
    Passerby: You're in a helicopter about 20 ft. off the ground.
    Man in helicopter: You must be in tech support.
    Passerby: I am. How did you know?
    Man in helicopter: Your answer was technically correct but completely useless.
    Passerby: You must be a businessman.
    Man in helicopter: I am. How did you know?
    Passerby: Because you don't know where you are or where you need to go, but you expect me to be able to help. You're no worse off than you were before, but now you think it's my fault.
  • There's a joke that goes like this:
    Person A: What does your dad do for a living?
    Person B: My dad's dead.
    Person A: Well, what did he do before he died?
    Person B: He sorta clutched at his chest and fell over.
  • There's an old joke about asking for directions that goes along these lines:
    Driver: Excuse me sir, but does this road go to London? (Or the name of any place)
    Pedestrian: This road, sir? No, sir. Tends to stay right where it is.
    or: No, they keep it here and drive cars on it.
    • Related joke
    Tourist: Excuse me, sir. If I go down the street and take a left, will the train station be there?
    Local: You know, the train station will be there even if you don't take a left.
    • There's another old joke, where a tourist lost in New York asks a street musician for directions:
    Tourist: Excuse me, sir. How do I get to Carnegie Hall?
    Musician: Practice, man! Practice!
    • And another
    Person A: Have you lived here all your life?
    Person B: Not yet.
    • Yet another
    Fat lady math teacher: Jimmy, pay attention! How much consumption until I reach Buffalo?
    Jimmy: Let's say twenty pounds of feed.
  • An engineer, a physicist, and a mathematician are on a train in Scotland. They see a black sheep, and the following exchange ensues:
    Engineer: Look, sheep in Scotland are black.
    Physicist: Well, all we know for sure is that some sheep in Scotland are black.
    Mathematician: All we can be sure of is that, in Scotland, there is at least one sheep that is black on at least one side.
  • Or this joke (when sitting at the table): "Can I have the butter?" "Yes." "Can you pass it to me?" "Yes." (beat) "What, now?"
  • Some teachers are fond of using this when kids ask to go to the bathroom, especially when they say "can" (asking if they're physically capable) instead of "may" (asking for permission):
    Student: Mr. Smith, can I go to the bathroom?
    Teacher: I don't know, can ya? Sit down.
    • There are rebuttals to this joke due to the prevalence of this by teachers and parents. One is to remind them that having the capacity to do so also requires their permission, so you are not capable of arriving at the bathroom if they deny you access. The other rebuttal uses word rules since the definition of "can" does allow for the original question to be correctly used.
    "When I was using can I was using its secondary model form as a verbal modifier asking for permission, as opposed to expressing an ability. I thought since you were a teacher you'd know that."
  • Russian variation of the balloon joke: Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson, being drifted away in a hot air balloon, finally spot a cowherd below and ask him where they are.
    - You are in a hot air balloon.
    - Watson, we're in Russia.
    - But Holmes, how can you know that?
    - See, that man below is a mathematician. His answer is both correct and totally useless.
    - I see, but what has Russia to do with that?
    - Because only in Russia do they use mathematicians to herd cows!
  • Watson and Holmes go camping. At three in the morning, Holmes wakes Watson.
    Watson, look up. What can you deduce from what you see?
    From the starry sky? Astronomically, there are millions of galaxies and potentially billions of planets. Astrologically, Saturn is in Leo. Theologically, God is great and we are small and insignificant. Horologically, it's about 3 AM. Meteorologically, we will have a beautiful day tomorrow. What do you deduce, Holmes?
    I deduce that you're an idiot, Watson. If we can see the stars, then our tent has been stolen!
  • "When I got home from work last night, my wife demanded that I take her someplace expensive so I took her to a gas station".
  • Someone waved at me in the street the other day. Then they said "I'm sorry I thought you were somebody else." I said "I am".
  • Then there's the one about a man in a motorboat, clearly lost, who comes alongside another man in a motorboat and yells "which way is land?" The second man bends over his compass and map for a moment, calculating furiously, then calls to the first man "west by north by half a north!" The first man screams back "don't get technical with me! Just point!"
  • Another old joke:
    Customer: Waiter, what is this fly doing in my soup?
    Waiter: I believe that's the backstroke, sir.
  • There's a joke with more of a logician's bent: an omniscient being comes to Earth and tells the world that it will answer one question completely truthfully before disappearing forever. The world's philosophers, logicians and thinkers get together and discuss for a while, and announce that they've come up with the perfect question. They go before the omniscient being and ask it this question: "What is the ordered pair of the best possible question we can ask you, and its answer?" It responds, "That, and this." then disappears in a puff of logic.
  • Another joke:
    Q Where was the Declaration of Independence signed?
    A At the bottom.
  • Yet another joke:
    Q: Do you know what time it is?
    A: Yes.
    Q: Well, could you tell me what time it is?
    A: Yes.
    Q: Will you tell me what time it is?
    A: Nope.
  • A woman asks her husband, a computer programmer, to go to the grocery store. She tells him to buy milk, and if they have eggs, to buy a dozen. He returns home with twelve gallons of milk and says, "They had eggs."
  • Another one:
    Q: Hey, What's up?
    A: Birds. Clouds. Aircrafts. The Sky...
    A: It's a preposition.

    Literature 
  • In Eragon, Brom and the titular character's first meeting with the witch Angela involves Mathematician answers as Brom successively asks her if she knows where the house of the person he is looking for is, and then would she tell him where it is, both her answers being in the affirmative. Brom and Eragon then stand there waiting until she looks up and tells them that, yes, she knows where the house is, and yes, she will tell them where it is, but they never directly asked her which house was the one they were looking for.
  • In Halo: The Fall of Reach, during a test of the MJOLNIR armor with shields Cortana asked the Master Chief what his plan was for dealing with a squad of ODST marines. He responded, "I'm going to finish counting to ten," because he had been instructed to do so.
  • In the book The Westing Game, Jake Wexler lists his position as "standing or sitting when not lying down."
  • Raymond Smullyan collected these:
    • General asks computer a two-part question: "1. Will the rocket reach the moon? 2. Will the rocket return to Earth?" Computer answers "yes." General asks, "Yes what?" Computer answers "Yes, sir."
    • "Where does this road go?" "It isn't going anywhere. It's just staying put."
    • One Vermont farmer approaches another. "My horse is sick. What did you give your horse when it was sick?" "Hay and molasses." Two weeks later: "I gave my horse hay and molasses, and it died." "Yep, so did mine."
  • The "Experimental Epistemologist" in Smullyan's 5000BC is full of this. When the completely disoriented protagonist asks the epistemologist "What should I do?", the response is "I have no idea what you SHOULD do. However, I have a friend who is an excellent moralist."
  • Discworld
    • From the novel Hogfather:
      Susan: Are those mountains real or some sort of shadows?
      Death: yes.
    • Similarly, when the Senior Wrangler suggests that the mistletoe, while being genuinely symbolic, is only symbolic of mistletoe:
      Archchancellor: That statement is either so deep it would take a lifetime to fully comprehend every particle of its meaning, or it is a load of absolute tosh. Which is it, I wonder?
      Senior Wrangler: [desperately] It could be both.
      Archchancellor: And that comment is either very perceptive, or very trite.
      Senior Wrangler: It could be bo-
      Archchancellor: Don't push it, Senior Wrangler.
    • And earlier in Hogfather:
      Lord Downey: Can I offer you a drink?
      Auditor: Yes ... we judge you capable of performing that action
    • Susan again, in Thief of Time:
      Susan: Are you Lobsang or are you Jeremy?
      Lobsang/Jeremy: Yes.
      Susan: Yes, I walked into that. Are you Lobsang and are you Jeremy?
      Lobsang/Jeremy: Much closer. Yes.
    • Rincewind and Eric, from Faust Eric!
      Rincewind: There's a door.
      Eric: Where does it go?
      Rincewind: It stays where it is, I think.
    • Yet another one, sort of, from Carpe Jugulum (paraphrased, without spoiling too much):
    Granny Weatherwax: Am I dying?
    Death:yes.
    Granny Weatherwax: But to you, everybody is dying, right? So you are not exactly being Mr. Helpful here.
    Death:yes
    • Death is fond of this. When Granny was presented a choice between the light and the darkness (long story) she asked him if he had any advice. He replied:
    Choose right.
    Demons were like genies or philosophy professors - if you didn't word things exactly right, they delighted in giving you absolutely accurate [...] answers.
    • As mentioned in Hogfather, when questioned about the origins of life, the philosopher Didactylos set forth this theory:
    Things just happened. What the hell?
    • The real problem with Mathematician's Answers in Discworld is that they often AREN'T — they're very accurate statements of the fact that, in a world where symbolism, belief, and narrative causality are physical laws of the universe, it is possible for something to be two different and contradictory things simultaneously.
    • Moist's wonderful use of this trope in a Bavarian Fire Drill during Making Money:
    Guard: Why's there only one of you?
    Moist: I don't know. You'd have to ask my mum and dad.
    • In Feet of Clay Vimes becomes very angry and hits a table in the Rats Chamber with an axe. The next morning, when Vetinari asks him what it is, he says "It's an axe, sir." Of course, Vetinari then proceeds to snark about how quickly he figured that out and ask the real question, which is why it was stuck in the table.
  • The Hitchhikers Guide To The Galaxy
    • When Zaphod learns that Marvin is waiting for them in the car park at The Restaurant at the End of the Universe (and has been for several trillion years), he asks what he's doing there. Marvin's answer? Parking cars. What else would he be doing there?
    • "42". For those that don't know about this, an alien race constructs a massive supercomputer in order to learn "The answer to the question of Life, the Universe, and Everything". The computer, after seven and a half million years of computation, comes back with "42". When asked about this, the computer responds that it is able to figure out the answer, but they need another computer to calculate what the question is. When this second computer is destroyed 15 minutes before its four-and-a-half-billion-year run to find the question completes, the programmers, afraid of the mob's reaction to this nonsense, just make up the question: "How many roads must a man walk down?"
    • Arthur has one in the first book as well:
    Arthur Dent: You know, it's at times like this, when I'm stuck in a Vogon airlock with a man from Betelgeuse, about to die of asphyxiation in deep space, that I really wish I'd listened to what my mother told me when I was young.
    Ford Prefect: Why? What did she tell you?
    Arthur Dent: I don't know! I didn't listen!
    • In Life The Universe And Everything, there is the character Prak. In a court case, he was injected with too much truth serum, and then he was instructed to tell "the Truth, the Whole Truth, and Nothing But the Truth." He responds by telling them everything that is true about, well, Life, the Universe, and Everything. Everyone present had to flee, leaving him alone telling the Truth, however by the time the protagonists arrive he has finished, telling them that there's not as much to it as one might expect, that he has forgotten it all now, but some of the best bits involved frogs and Arthur Dent.
  • Jarlaxle the drow from R.A. Salvatore's series of Drizzt books is so fond of the Mathematician's Answer that "Yes" might as well be his catch phrase.
  • Animorphs: After being told by the resident friendly alien member of the team that they have all been dragged through a fracture in space-time continuum
    Jake: Did we go forward or back? Are we in the past or the future?
    Ax: Yes. It's definitely one of those two choices.
  • Yet another of Peter David's favorite literature tricks to tweak the nose of higher-class people (especially Vulcans in his Star Trek novels): The high-class person asks, "May I ask where you're going?" The person answers, "Yes". It takes the Vulcan a second to comprehend.
    • Fridge Brilliance: if there's anyone you'd expect to understand the Mathematician's Answer trope, it would be a Vulcan. But the Vulcan is speaking what is, for him, a second language, and probably thinks of that particular construction as an idiom with only a loose connection to its literal meaning.
  • In the Dragaera series, this is one of the things Hawklords are known for. It's also why Vlad would have killed Daymar out of sheer annoyance if it wasn't for his invaluable psychic skills.
  • The Angel, a character in Mike Resnick's Santiago: A Myth of the Far Future does it several times:
    "How are you going to ...?"
    "Efficiently."

    "What did you cut him with?"
    "Something sharp."
  • Used by the Logician in the Ionesco play Rhinocros.
  • In The Last Watch, when Edgar uses a truth spell on Rustam, this exchange takes place:
    Edgar: How can I take the Crown of All Things?
    Rustam: With your hands.
    • Weirdly, this answer is wrong.
  • Momo is leaning hard into the direction of being a smart ass.
    "As far as I can remember... I've always been around."
  • In David Weber's Safehold series, Nimue/Merlin's AI assistant Owl persists in responding to her/his questions with literal answers, despite the manufacturer's assertion that it's supposed to learn to reply colloquially. It finally begins to show some improvements in the fourth book, A Mighty Fortress.
  • From Choosers of the Slain:
    "Be careful what she teaches her," Adams said, without looking up. "You might get a very nasty surprise."
    "Are you talking about Anastasia teaching Katya or the other way around?" Nielson asked, grinning.
    "Yes."
  • This is used to fight mind control in the Magic Kingdom of Landover, when someone is forced to answer questions.
    Ben: Where can I find the dragon?
    Nightshade: Everywhere.
  • In Isaac Asimov's Black Widowers story Truth to Tell the monthly guest, a man who never tells a lie, is suspected of a crime which it seems only he could have committed, but he continually denies it, saying: "I didn't take the cash or the bonds." However the waiter, Henry, asks him: "Did you take the cash and the bonds?" The guest declines to answer and leaves.
    • This is using the word or differently than usual, but inversely compared to how this trope is normally played out. In normal speech, or is used as an exclusive or, unless in a negative sentence, such as here, which is normally an inclusive or. He's using it as an exclusive or, and as that excludes the possibility of taking both, he's technically telling the truth.
  • Used in Simon R. Green's Wolf in the Fold, when Hawk and Fisher question suspects about the two murders under a truthspell. All the suspects can correctly answer "No" when asked if they murdered Victim #1 and Victim #2, because the two deaths were the handiwork of different killers.
  • This exchange from A Storm of Swords:
    Bran: Maybe we shouldn't stay here.
    Meera: By the well? Or in the Nightfort?
    Bran: Yes.
  • Spike Milligan put plenty of these in his war memoirs, Adolf Hitler: My Part in His Downfall:
    Waiter: Anything to drink?
    Spike: Yes anything.
  • An example where this is not played for laughs occurs in The Dresden Files novel Small Favor, when Harry brings the injured Valkyrie Gard to Michael Carpenter's house for treatment. Michael's fellow Knight Sanya is there and is examining Gard, noting that she is more than human. He asks "The woman. What is she?" to which Harry responds "Injured." Sanya understands the implied rebuke immediately and apologizes.
  • In American Gods, Shadow gets one from Whiskey Jack, and then promptly calls him on it.
    Shadow: Where are we? Am I on the tree? Am I dead? Am I here? I thought everything was finished. What's real?
    Whiskey Jack: Yes.
    Shadow: Yes? What kind of an answer is Yes?
    Whiskey Jack: It's a good answer. True answer too.
    • Shadow gets one from Sweeney as well
    Sweeney: [performs an elaborate coin vanishing trick]
    Shadow: We have to talk about that. I need to know how you did it.
    Sweeney: I did it with panache and style.
  • How Rude!, an etiquette book aimed at teenagers, contains an anecdote from the author. He attempted to call a friend of his and the friend's five-year-old son answered. When the author asked if his daddy was there, the boy replied, "Yes."
  • David Eddings' The Belgariad. One of the most memorable ones was when Durnik went to ask a fisherman about the situation on the other side of a river.
    Belgarath: Well?
    Durnik: The fish are biting.
    Belgarath: I meant on the other side.
    Durnik: I did not ask, but if the fish are biting on this side, it would only stand to reason they are biting over there too, doesn't it?
  • During Galaxy of Fear, the Arrandas and their uncle Hoole find a human where no humans should be. They ask him how he got there, he says "I walked."
  • Storm of Swords. Jamie Lannister, being interrogated by Catelyn Stark about the circumstances of an attempt made on Brann Stark's life after he witnessed something incriminating, uses this to avoid giving away any of his true reasons.
    Catelyn: You pushed my son out a window. Why?
    Jamie: I hoped the fall would kill him.
  • From Phule's Paradise, Phule's butler pulls one of these on a hotel manager:
    Bombest: How do you do it?
    Beeker: Sir?
    Bombest: You're a fairly ordinary guy, not at all like Mr. Phule or the uniformed fanatics he's associating with. How do you do your job?
    Beeker: Very well, sir.
    Bombest: Excuse me?
  • Iain Banks loved this trope. The most extensive example is in Against a Dark Background:
    Man: Hello?
    Zefla Hello. We're looking for a gentleman called Ivexton Travapeth.
    Man: Yes.
    Zefla *beat* You're not him, then?
    Man: No.
    Zefla Right. Do you know where we can find him?
    Man: Yes.
    Zefla Could you tell us where he is?
    Man: Yes.
    Zefla Where is he?
    Man: Oh, here.
    Zefla May we see him?
    Man: Oh, yes.
    Sharrow *quietly* Keep going, the passports only last a year.
    Zefla *tries not to laugh* Good. Thank you. We'd have phoned or screened but Mister Travapeth seems to discourage that sort of contact.
    Man: Yes.
    Zefla Yes. Could you let us in?
    Man: Yes, yes.
    Zefla Please come down and let us in.
    Man: Very well.
    Sharrow Wake me when the door opens or the universe ends, whichever's sooner.
    Man *opens door*
    Zefla Good-morning.
    Man: Yes.
  • Catch-22 has Yossarian being interrogated in hospital. He is slightly delirious at the time, though.
    "Where were you born?"
    "In a hospital."
    "In what state were you born?"
    "A state of innocence."
  • Skulduggery Pleasant has this exchange:
    Fletcher: How did you beat them?
    Skulduggery: With unimaginable skill.
    • This seems to be Skulduggery's preferred form of answer.
    Valkyrie: What is it?
    Skulduggery: It's a box.
    Valkyrie: What kind of box?
    Skulduggery: A wooden one.
    Valkyrie: OK, I'll try this. Why are we hiding from a box?
    Skulduggery: We're not. We're hiding from what's inside the box.
  • This is, not surprisingly considering that the author was in fact a mathematician, one of the logical twists Lewis Carroll peppered throughout Alice's Adventures in Wonderland:
    "Would you tell me, please, which way I ought to go from here?"
    "That depends a good deal on where you want to get to," said the Cat.
    "I don't much care where—" said Alice.
    "Then it doesn't matter which way you go," said the Cat.
    "—so long as I get somewhere," Alice added as an explanation.
    "Oh, you're sure to do that," said the Cat, "if you only walk long enough."
  • From The Catcher in the Rye:
    "What are you reading?"
    "Goddamn book"
  • After a particularly surreal portion of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, Harry asks if the previous discussion was real, or just in his head. His companion simply responds that being in his head wouldn't make their conversation any less real.

    Live Action TV 
  • In Happy Endings Penny fakes being engaged in front of her safety Shershow, who's about to get married to a beautiful woman.
    Shershow: So Penny that's great, you got engaged. To who?
    Penny Uh...my fiance.
  • MythBusters: When Adam is taken to Jamie's secret locationnote , this exchange ensues:
    Adam: Where are we?
    Jamie: We're right here.
  • Scrubs:
    Dr. Kelso: Would someone explain what that bird is doing in my hospital?
    Janitor: Sanchez appears to be flying, sir. I've named him Sanchez.
  • The Vorlons of Babylon 5 love this trope.
    Kosh: They are alone. They are a dying people. We should let them pass.
    Sinclair: Who? The Narns or the Centauri?
    Kosh: Yes.
    • Everything that Kosh says is not exactly helpful:
    Sheridan: "How do I know you're the same Vorlon? Inside that encounter suit, you could be anyone."
    Kosh: "I have always been here."
    Sheridan: "Oh yeah? You said that about me, too."
    Kosh: "Yes."
    Sheridan: "I really hate it when you do that."
    Kosh: "Good."
    • In one case, Sheridan had asked what was in the random access hatch Kosh had led him to. Kosh's answer was "One moment of perfect beauty." Sheridan lampshades this: "Well, as answers go, short, to the point, utterly useless and totally consistent with what I've come to expect from a Vorlon." It turns out, this is a completely factual statement, though it makes no sense until you can see the context. This gets lampshaded again in the same episode when Ivanova asks Sheridan what Kosh showed him. Sheridan responds "Beauty...in the dark." Ivanova remarks that Kosh's lessons must be working, because Sheridan is starting to talk like a Vorlon.
    • According to the RPG, the Vorlon don't usually do it on purpose: their language is fully telepathic, and most of the usually deep meaning is lost in translation due them not being used at voicing it. Then again, sometimes we get Vorlon like Kosh, who is capable of expressing himself (relatively) well with a voice but still leaves out details, either to have people think and realize what he mean by themselves, because what he was asked is meant to stay secret, or just for the hell of it.
    • The Drakh do the same in season 4: "Drakh? Is that your name or your species?" "Yes."
    • J. Michael Straczynski himself has used it on occasion. (warning: link contains spoilers) "Was Kosh's line about Sheridan going to Z'ha'dum a warning or a threat?" "Yes."
  • The French-Canadian sitcom Un Gars Une Fille (A Guy and a Girl), has the titular Guy ask his girlfriend which of two wines she wants for supper. She answers "Yes." This prompts him to reply "When someone gives you a choice between two things, you can't answer with yes! If you're afraid of committing to a decision, do you want me to pick for you, or do you want me to leave choices up to you?" Her answer? "Yes! Yes Yes Yes!"
  • Star Trek has come up with the Heisenberg compensator, allowing the transporter to get around the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. When asked how it works, Mike Okuda's response was '[It] works just fine, thank you.'
    McCoy: Well, either choke me or cut my throat. Make up your mind.
    Khan: English. I thought I dreamed hearing it. Where am I?
    • On Deep Space Nine, Odo is asked by Lwaxana Troi if Odo is his first or last name. Yes, it is.
    • In a later episode, we get to know that Odo is his first name. His second is Ital. (The Cardassian word Odo'ital means "Unknown Sample," which is exactly what he was to the scientists who discovered him.)
      • Well, he was named on Bajor, where the Eastern name order is accepted, so it's still Mathematician's.
    • On an episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation, Wesley talks to The Custodian (a computer), after having been told he's allowed to ask of it any question:
    Wesley: Custodian, can you show me where Harry is?
    The Custodian: Yes.
    Wesley: Custodian, show me Harry.
  • Andromeda:
    Dylan Hunt: Are you dead or alive?
    Trance Gemini: Yes.
    • Given that Trance is the avatar of a star, this makes some sense.
  • In British comedy The IT Crowd, Roy runs into this trying to run tech support.
    Roy: Is it a PC, or a Mac?
    Judy: ...Yes!
    • From the same episode:
      Roy: What was that name, was it Julie or Judy?
      Moss: Yes. One of those.
  • In The A-Team, an exchange between Hannibal and Murdock goes something like this:
    Hannibal: How does that sound?
    Murdock: Well, Colonel, it doesn't make much of a sound at all!
  • Better Off Ted had a great one:
    Lawyer: Could you describe your job?
    Veronica: Yes.
    Lawyer: How would you describe your job?
    Veronica: Cleverly.
  • That Seventies Show provides this example when 2 state troopers arrive at the Foreman house during a party:
    State Trooper: Ma'am, are you the owner of this house?
    Midge: No, I'm not.
    State Trooper: Do you know the owners?
    Midge: Yes, I do!
    State Trooper: Could you get them, please!?
    • Showing that the trooper is a bit slow, or he would've realized that Midge can answer, "Yes, I could."
  • Night Court: Bull helps deliver a baby. Asks the exhausted mother, "What is it?", wanting to know the gender. Bull: "It's a baby!"
  • Doctor Who:
    • From "The Big Bang."
      Doctor: Are you married, River?
      River Song: Are you asking?
      Doctor: Yes.
      River Song: Yes.
      Doctor: No, hang on. Did you think I was asking you to marry me, or asking if you were married?
      River Song: Yes.
      Doctor: No, but was that yes, or yes?
      River Song: Yes.
      • An earlier exchange between the Doctor and Rory:
        Doctor: So, 2,000 years. How did you do?
        Rory: Kept out of trouble.
        Doctor: Oh. How?
        Rory: Unsuccessfully.
    • From "The Two Doctors"
      Doctor: I closed my respiratory passages as soon as I detected any danger.
      Peri: Well, then how did you breathe?
      Doctor: With difficulty.
    • Similarly, from "The Doctor's Wife"
      Amy: How do you leave the universe?
      Doctor: With enormous difficulty!
    • In "A Good Man Goes To War", we meet Madame Vashtra, a female Silurian in the late 1800s:
      Vastra: Jack the Ripper has taken his last victim.
      Jenny: How did you find him?
    • Another great one, from Flesh and Stone:
      Bishop: "Dr. Song, I've lost good men today. Do you trust this man?"
      River: "I absolutely trust him."
      Bishop: "He's not some sort of madman, then?"
      Beat
      River: "I absolutely trust him."
    • During the events of The Name of the Doctor:
      Vastra: "We are awaiting only one more participant."
      Strax: "Oh no. Not the one with the gigantic head."
      Jenny: "It's hair, Strax."
      Strax: "Hmph. Hair."
      River (popping in): "Madame Vastra."
      Vastra: "Professor. Help yourself to some tea."
      River: {she has a champagne bucket} "Why thank you."
      Jenny: "How did you do that?!"
      River (smiling): "Disgracefully."
    • In "The Wheel in Space":
      Zoe: This Doctor friend of yours. Is he a scientist?
      Jamie: He is in a way I suppose, yes.
      Zoe: What's his specialty?
      Jamie: His what?
      Zoe: Well, is he a physicist, biochemist, astronomer, biometrician?
      Jamie: Yes, he is.
  • Given a serious purpose in an episode of The West Wing, when White House counsel Oliver Babish is preparing C.J. to testify before Congress:
    Babish: Do you know what time it is?
    C.J.: It's five past noon.
    Babish: I'd like you to get out of the habit of doing that.
    C.J.: Doing what?
    Babish: Answering more than was asked... Do you know what time it is?
    (C.J. stares at him silently for several moments)
    C.J.: Yes.
    • Though also played for laughs when Will is attempting to obfuscate an angry Assistant Secretary of State:
    Assistant Secretary of State: Are you rewriting the foreign policy section?
    Will: Yes.
    Assistant Secretary of State: Dramatically?
    Will: I like to think I have a certain flair...
    • Done twice in the pilot, both times played for laughs. First, when Leo is looking for Josh and goes to Donna, who's sitting at her desk:
    Leo: Is (Josh) there?
    Donna: Yes.
    (Beat)
    Leo: Could you get him?
    Donna: (yelling towards Josh's office) Josh!
    Leo: Thanks.
    • And then a bit later, between Leo and Mrs. Landingham, when they're talking about the President's bike accident:
    Mrs. Landingham: Have they done an X-ray?
    Leo: Yep.
    Mrs. Landingham: Is anything broken?
    Leo: A $4000 Lynex Titanium touring bike that I swore I'd never lend anyone.
  • On Just Shoot Me!, when Elliot asks Dennis if he's licking stamps, Dennis answers sarcastically "I was, now I'm answering obvious questions." When a pretty model asks the same question, Dennis cordially responds "Why, yes I am."
  • A guest of The Golden Girls tells the girls his wife has just had triplets. "What are they?" asks Dorothy. Rose answers, "That's when three babies are born at the same time."
  • LOST provided a perfect example during the flight to return to the island:
    Jack: How can you read? [at a time like this]
    Ben: My mother taught me.
    • He's lying as usual. His mother died shortly after giving birth to him.
    • Another one from when Richard Alpert gives the Time Jumping Locke a compass.
    Locke: What's it do?
    Alpert: It points North, John.
  • The Muppet Show
    Scooter: Christopher Reeve, fifteen seconds to curtain, Christopher!
    Christopher Reeve: Oh thanks a lot, Scooter. Hey listen, can you tell me what these rats are doing in my dressing room?
    Scooter: I think it's the Foxtrot.
    • Kermit's contribution to a string of "fly in the soup" jokes.
      "So I ask the waiter, 'What's this fly doing in my alphabet soup?', and the waiter answers, 'Standing in for an apostrophe'."
  • On The Newlywed Game
    • Bob Eubanks asked "If you don't win the game today, what would be the reason?" The husband answered "Because we didn't answer the questions right." (The answer on his wife's card read "(Because she) Laughs too much")
  • From The Young Ones:
    Rick: Alright, what's the stair carpet doing on the fire?
    Vyvyan: Burning! What's it look like?!
    • Also:
    Neil: (answering the phone): Someone's asking if we know the name of a short fat comedian.
    Mike: Yes.
    Neil: (into the phone): Yes we do! (puts the phone down).
    • Another:
    Vyvyan: 11:05 and it's still raining. I wonder how hard it is.
    Rick: Not very hard, seeing as it's only made of water.
    • Mike walks in holding a fish. He asks "What is this!?" Everyone else replies, "A FISH!" He realizes they are right and leaves. Later in the episode he comes back with the fish, having figured out what he meant to ask. He asks, "What is this fish doing in my bed!?" Someone points out to him it is not in his bed, he is holding it in his hands. He realizes they are right and leaves. Still later, he comes back, sure he has figured it out for good, with NOTHING in his hands. He says, "What is this fish doing in my bed!?" Everyone says, "WHAT FISH?"
    • Still another:
    Girl: Oh, is that the time?
    Mike: No, that's a wristwatch. Time is abstract concept.
  • And from the opening scene of the later Mayall/Edmondson/Planer/Elton series, Filthy Rich & Catflap:
    Richie: What are you doing in my bed?
    Eddie: Well I was sleeping. But now I'm talking to a git.
  • In a parody of government officials avoiding giving direct answers, The Daily Show's Stephen Colbert and Steve Carell had this exchange:
    Stephen: There are things I don't tell you.
    Steve: Oh, you tell me everything.
    Stephen: No, I don't.
    Steve: Like what?
    Stephen: I can't tell you.
    Steve: Well, does it involve you or me?
    Stephen: Yes.
    Steve: Who? Me, or you?
    Stephen: Steve, we've exhausted this topic.
    • Another example: In 2003, when Prince Charles was alleged to have had a gay experience, Britain's strict libel and slander laws prevented anyone from commenting publicly on the charge. Colbert, doing a report on the scandal, was asked by Jon Stewart if he had learned any specifics. Colbert said, "Yes I have, Jon."
  • In Smallville, when Clark wants to talk to Lois about their relationship:
    Clark: Lois, what are we doing?
    Lois: I'm eating a maple donut and and you're kind of invading my personal space.
  • In Party Down:
    Ron: What am I not hearing?
    Roman: I don't know... a squid? There are other options...
    • Roman is supposed to be DJ and is not at his post.
  • In Get Smart, one of Maxwell Smart's many catchphrases is a mathematician's answer. When asked how he did something, or how he planned to do something, he would respond: "With great difficulty."
    • ...and, loving it.
  • Cheers:
    • Cliff Claven attempted to use such an answer on Jeopardy when asked to identify three actors by their original, non-stage names. His reply was "Who are three people who have never been in my kitchen?" Correct, but ...
    • One conversation:
      Frasier: O death in life, the days that are no more — who said that?
      Woody: Who said what?
      Frasier: "O death in life, the days that are no more."
      Woody: You did.
      Frasier: No, I mean, who said it first?
      Woody: You said it both times.
    • Another example had Cliff give a long and detailed explanation about why they drank ice cold beer in the middle of winter (which essentially centred around the need to equalise your internal and external temperatures). When he had finished, carla then asked him why they also drank it summer. His response was "What else are we going to do with it?".
  • In episode six of the first season of Boardwalk Empire, Margaret tells a friend in the Temperance League that a man has made her an offer. The friend asks, "Financial? Domestic? Sexual?", and Margaret replies, "Yes."
  • In Charlie Shakes It Up, Deuce says he "has the situation under control", which prompts this:
    Teddy: So when he says he has it under control, should we be relieved or worried?
    Cece & Rocky: Yes.
  • Game of Thrones:
    Tyrion: What sort of accent is that?
    Shae: Foreign.
    • And again:
    Catelyn: Why did you push my son from the window?
    Jaime: I hoped the fall would kill him.
  • Barney Miller: Wojo is questioning a prostitute he has just arrested:
    Wojo: Any prior convictions?
    Prostitute: I used to think that cleanliness was next to godliness.
  • In The Sarah Connor Chronicles, this is sometimes how Cameron responds to questions.
  • Police Squad!
    • A Running Gag where Frank holds a cigarette out to a witness or suspect and asks "cigarette?" The implication is that he's asking if they want one, but they always answer "Yes, I know," or "Yes, it is."
    • Another example, which appeared both on the show and in one of the movies. When the squad raids a criminal hideout, a pretty gun moll asks "Is this some kind of bust?". While looking at her chest, Drebin replies "Yes, it is very impressive".
  • Mock the Week has a Jeopardy parody called If This is the Answer, What is the Question?, which naturally wound up like the Jeopardy example above on occasion.
  • From House:
    Masters: House, how many prostitutes have you had?
    House: As in eaten? Ever? This year?
    Masters: Slept with. Since you've been here.
    House: All but one. She did my taxes.
  • In The X-Files episode "One Breath", Melissa Scully comes to visit Mulder at his apartment, where he is sitting in the dark hoping to surprise an intruder.
    Melissa: Why is it so dark in here?
    Mulder: Because the lights aren't on.
  • The Mystic Knights of Tir Na Ng: In a Courtroom Episode, Angus was facing trial and, when it seemed he'd be convicted, the truth was revealed. In the end, Angus asked the judge if he'd be acquitted or convicted without the new evidence and the judge said he'd certainly be one of those.
  • Superhuman Samurai Syber-Squad: In one episode, the heroes were playing with a game that told people's luck with basis on their dates of birth. Mrs. Starkey decided to try and asked Amp when he was born. Despite knowing about the game, he told the hour. When she explained she wanted to know the day, he said he was born in Wednesday.
  • On an episode of Two and a Half Men Jake had a test where he wrote that Abraham Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation in...pen.
  • In Rik Mayall's Believe Nothing (made when David Blunkett was Britain's Home Secretary):
    Receptionist: The Home Secretary is in the waiting room. He wants to know if he can see you.
    Adonis Cnut: Of course he can't see me. He's blind.
  • While the above fictional Jeopardy examples are based on the contestant's responses, the clues themselves can seem like this if you go along with the concept that they're the answers to the questions that the correct responses ask. Who, when asked "what are chairs?" would answer "George Hepplewhite was known for designing the backs of these in such shapes as hearts & shields"?!
  • Famously on the Only Fools and Horses episode If They Could See Us Now, in which Del boy is on a quiz show hosted by Jonathan Ross:
    Jonathan Ross: In what state was President Kennedy in when he was shot?
    Del Boy: Well he was in a terrible state, he died!
  • The Big Bang Theory had an instance when Raj (who usually has trouble talking to women) was getting a little too attached to Siri, to the point that his friends described it as "dating a phone". When Bernadette asked if it was cute or creepy, Howard simply said "uh-huh".
    • In the episode "The Engagement Reaction"
    Leonard: So, how is she?
    Howard: Theyre running tests. I dont know. It may have been a heart attack or heart-attack-like event.
    Penny: Whats the difference?
    Sheldon: A heart-attack-like event is an event thats like a heart attack.
    Penny: Thanks for clearing that up.
    • Also this exchange from "The Apology Insufficiency" after someone knocks on the door:
    Leonard: Want to get that?
    Sheldon: Not particularly.
    Leonard: Could you get that?
    Sheldon: I suppose I could if I were asked.
    Leonard: Would you please get that?
    Sheldon: Of course. (beat) Why do you have to make things so complicated?
  • From the Supernatural episode "Hunteri Heroici":
    Dean: Hey Cas, what's the word?
    Castiel: It's a shortened version of my name.
  • The Following has this exchange in "Whips and Regrets":
    Parker: So, are you an alcoholic, or just a problem drinker?
    Hardy: Yes.
  • Monty Python's Flying Circus had several, one such example with a mathematician's riposte thrown in:
    Woman 1: What's on the television then?
    Woman 2: (looks over to see the TV turned off and a penguin standing atop it) Looks like a penguin... ...Funny that penguin being there, innit? What's it doing there?
    Woman 1: Standing.
    Brian (holding a bazooka): Not so fast!
    All: Brian!
    Arthur: Ooh, what's that?
  • From Community:
    • In "Basic Human Anatomy"
      Annie: So, I'm number two again, which is what it is. But you know, if I'm not going to be valedictorian, I'm glad it will be you.
      Shirley: Me too.
      Annie: You mean, you hope it's me if it's not you, or that you're glad it's you?
      Shirley: Yes.
  • In Square One TV segment Mathnet, a musician plays Air Guitar complete with sound effects. This prompts the following exchange with George Frankly:
    George Frankly: How did you do that?
    Musician: Bloody Perfectly.
  • David Tennant once hosted a Doctor Who-themed episode of comedy quiz show Never Mind the Buzzcocks, which featured the following question:
    Tennant: Knock knock.
    Panellist: Who's there?
    Tennant: Doctor
    Panellist: Doctor who?
    Tennant: Correct!
  • Friends :
    Joey: Hey Phoebes, do you think it would be okay if I asked out your sister?
    Phoebe: Why? Why would you want to do that?
    Joey: So that if we went out on a date, she'd be there.
  • The Suite Life of Zack and Cody: London Tipton gets bonus points for this gem:
    Cody: London! What's twelve times twelve?
    London: [beat] A math question?
  • One bit of edutainment featured a musical sketch with the Ridiculously Human Robot "Mr. Computer Man" who boasts in his song that he can do anything we humans can. When asked how to spell a simple word, he spells it out. When asked "How do you spell supercalifragilisticexpialidocious?" however, he thinks a moment and then replies "With letters!"

    Music 
  • When asked what his songs were about, Bob Dylan responded, "Some are about three minutes, some are about four minutes..."
  • Elvis Costello, Brutal Youth, "My Science Fiction Twin":
    "They ask, 'How in the world he does all these things,'/ and he answers, 'Superbly'"
  • Jez Lowe has an example in his song "High Part of the Town":
    They tried to teach geography, but I found it much too hard/When they asked me where does coal come from, I answered next doors yard
  • When asked whether she was a singer of country, pop, blues, or jazz, Crystal Gayle replied, "Yes."

    Newspaper Comics 
  • Bloom County has one in its first series about the Presidential election. Trying to find a local candidate, Milo asks the bum Limekiller "How do you stand on nuclear waste?" Limekiller immediately begins balancing awkwardly on one foot, earning Milo's approval.
  • Calvin and Hobbes featured this exchange in a Sunday strip:
    Miss Wormwood: Calvin, pay attention! We're studying geography! Now, what state do you live in?
    Calvin: Denial.
    Miss Wormwood: ...I don't suppose I can argue with THAT.
    • And in a weekday strip:
    [Calvin and Hobbes are sitting under a tree.]
    Calvin: Why are we here?
    Hobbes: Because we walked here.
    Calvin: No, I mean here on Earth.
    Hobbes: Because Earth can support life.
    Calvin: No, why are we anywhere? Why do we exist?
    Hobbes: Because we were born.
    Calvin [angry]: Forget it.
    Hobbes [just as angry]: I will, thank you.
  • Peanuts
    • Similar to the Eddie Izzard example: in a 1960s strip, Charlie Brown is trying to teach Sally to count. When shown a picture and asked "How many boats do you see?" she answers "All of them!"
    • In another strip, Schroeder is injured by a foul ball while playing baseball. When Charlie Brown asks him if he can still play, Schroeder runs home and pounds out a Beethoven sonata on his toy piano while still wearing his catcher's mask.
    Schroeder: It's all right. I can still play.
    Charlie Brown: That isn't exactly what I meant.
    • In another strip, Peppermint Patty has to write a report on Hamlet. Her report begins "A hamlet is a small village with a population of maybe a few hundred and ..."
  • Mafalda has Libertad unknowingly doing this to Susanita.
    Susanita: So, what does your dad do?
    Libertad: He doesn't know.
    Susanita: He doesn't know?
    Libertad: "I don't know what I do there" he always says.
    Susanita: "There" where?
    Libertad: "In that stall" he says.
    Susanita: What kind of stall?!
    Libertad: "Awful" he says.

    Theater 
  • In Chicago:
    She'd say, "What's your sister like?" I'd say, "men."
  • In Hamlet: Polonius asks what Hamlet is reading.
    Hamlet: Words, words, words.
  • In The Pirates of Penzance, the Major-General wants to find out something about the men in piratical outfits who propose to marry his daughters:
    Major General: May I ask this is a picturesque uniform, but Im not familiar with it. What are you?
    Pirate King: We are all... single gentlemen.
  • In Iolanthe, when Strephon is required to prove that the title character is really his mother, he points out she gave birth to him and raised him from childhood, and therefore she must be his mother.
  • In Twelfth Night, when Malvolio tells Olivia that a man wants to see her and will not be turned away:
    Olivia: What kind of man is he?
    Malvolio: Why, of mankind.
    Olivia: What manner of man?
    Malvolio: Of very ill-manner.
    • Also, when Viola meets Feste:
      Viola: Save thee, friend, and thy music: dost thou live by thy tabour?
      Feste: No, sir, I live by the church.
      Viola: Art thou a churchman?
      Feste: No such matter, sir: I do live by the church; for I do live at my house, and my house doth stand by the church.

    Video Games 
  • Mass Effect 2 has one character who gives these sort of answers almost by default:
    Shepard: You watch me or you watch organics?
    Legion: Yes.
    Shepard: Which?
    Legion: Both.
    • Said character also has a nasty habit of providing massively important information under the verbal heading of "Addendum:", which is kind of a mathematician's answer in its own right; yes, it is indeed an additional piece of information that you did not have a moment ago. It's also frequently something you would, ideally, have liked to have known before you did what you just did...
  • In Discworld Noir, when Lewton asks the butler if he can see Count von Uberwald, the Servile Snarker responds that he is in no position to judge how good Lewton's eyesight is.
  • Sten of Dragon Age: Origins loves to do this.
    Warden: What were you doing in that cage?
    Sten: Sitting.
  • In Dragon Age II, a sidequest has Hawke go fetch some pickaxes for a group of miners from a smith in town whose name they forgot.
    Hawke: Are you the smith?
    Smith: I'm a Smith.
    Hawke: Is "Smith" your name or your profession?
    Smith: Yep.
  • Done beautifully in Arcanum: Of Steamworks & Magick Obscura when you try to get the location of the Hidden Elf Village Quintarra from Myrth the Elf. He repeatedly answers "In the Glimmering Forest" (said forest covers a third of Arcanum) and "In the trees" while being delighted at your frustration. When you give up, you turn it back on him:
    Myrth: "Why do you want to know, if you don't mind me asking?"
    You: "No, I don't mind at all that you're asking."
    Myrth: Well?
    You: ...
    Myrth: Aren't you going to answer?
    You: ...
    Myrth: Out with it, man/woman!
    You: I said I didn't mind you asking, not that I'd answer.
  • The third generation Pokmon games will let you answer yes or no...to the question of where your character came from. If you answer "yes," he'll reply that he's never heard of Yes Town. If you say no, he'll say that you have to have come from somewhere.
  • Same deal in EarthBound. Someone asks you to name a Beatles song - XXXterday. If you say Yes, that is technically correct. If you say No, the asker answers that Noterday is just wrong.
  • In Borderlands 2: Mister Torgue's Campaign of Carnage, Mister Torgue explains that the reason he's always disorganized and was unable to find a sponsor for the Vault Hunter was because he was "busy suplexing a shark wearing a bolo tie". He then notices that "You may ask, who was wearing the bolo tie, you or the shark?". Answer: YES.
    • There's also a question asked on his Reddit: "WHAT'S YOUR FAVORITE TYPE OF EXPLOSION?" Answer: YES.
  • The game Star Control 2 has a race with a game called Frungy. One of the creators was asked how Frungy is played. "With gusto!"
  • In Bayonetta, the titular witch meets a little girl called Cereza. Bayonetta asks where she is from. She responds "I... I'm from my house".
  • In Legend of Mana, one specific sidequest involves you convincing dropout students to go back to school. One of them thinks that Adults Are Useless because they answer questions but never actually say anything useful. You have to convince him otherwise... except your character can only say yes or no.

    Webcomics 
  • Invoked by Word of God in response to this Drowtales page. When a reader asked if Kiel was referring to the flying daggers, or fire wielding dude when she said 'I want one of those', Drowtales writer Kern stated the correct answer was "Yes"
  • Edmund Finneys Quest To Find The Meaning Of Life has this comic.
  • In The Order of the Stick, the Oracle's first answer to Roy's question "Where is Xykon?" was "In his throne room." Roy persuaded him to follow up with a more useful answer.
    • Vaarsuvius does this to Haley in another strip
    • This is generally the sort of answer given when a question is asked about V's gender.
    • When asked where Girard's Gate (the Artifact sealing Girard's Rift) is, a deliberately unhelpful (but compelled to tell the truth) mummy, does this. It first answers "in the Desert", then, when asked for ulterior clarification, it says "around Girard's Rift" (which the protagonists and readers know already, since it's sealing it), and finally, when asked where Girard's Rift is, it goes: "Between Girard's Buttcheeks."
    Elan: The tragic loss to the field of ass comedy diminishes us all.
  • On the Gunnerkrigg Court forum, Tom Siddell gives this type of answer to the few questions he doesn't want to answer.
    Fan: What did the Court do with Sivo's body? ... Was Sivo laid to rest somewhere near the Court, or were his remains sent to an Orjak burial ground in the Bovec Mountains or elsewhere?
    Tom Siddell: Eglamore dealt with the matter in the way agreed on between he and his friend.
    ...
    Fan: I like how most characters have slightly different skin colors. But because they do, I'm not sure what to make of Zimmy's ashen color. Do you consider it to be in the expected range of variation for Gunnerkrigg characters (it does seem like the Headmaster's is quite similar), or is it intended to suggest something like unhealthiness or unnaturalness or even just griminess?
    Tom Siddell: Yup.
  • This Irregular Webcomic! strip.
  • Yeah, Something Positive did it, too.
    "Davan, I'm going to force self-worth into you if I have to do it with a suppository."
    "Be gentle, it'll be my first time."
    "First time to be rectally violated or first time to feel good about yourself?"
    "Yes."
    "I honestly, truly hate you."
    "Because I did that to your character, or because I thought to put it in a game before you?"
    "Yes."
  • The Flaky Pastry 100th strip spectacular showed Nitrine giving a slightly more helpful Mathematician's Answer.
  • Sluggy Freelance: Kusari answers with one here.
    Kusari: Dr. Shankraft, you are in trouble. In a permanent sense. We can help.
    Dr. Shankraft: Help me get "into" my permanent trouble, or "out" of it?
    Kusari: Yes.
  • Able And Baker gives one of these here.
    "What's your honest opinion?"
    "The one thing I can never be wrong about."
  • This strip from the "spelling bee" arc in Terror Island:
    York: Stephen, your word is "Camelopard."
    Stephen: Can you use it in a sentence?
    York: Almost certainly.
    Stephen: Sorry, will you use it in a sentence?
    York: Probably not. It isn't a very common word.
  • xkcd gets one early on here:
    What time is it?
    Now.
    That's a pretty boring answer.
    Is not. It's the least boring answer imaginable.
  • From Wapsi Square, Shelly gives one when asked where she got her tattoo.
  • In 8-Bit Theater, we have two examples:
    • Having been jumped on multiple times by both Red Mage and Dragoon, Black Mage gives us this exchange:
      Thief: Since when do you care about quests?
      Black Mage: Since it's a convenient excuse to butcher Sir Hopsalot for revenge.
      Dragoon: You mean Red Mage or me?
      Black Mage: YES.
    • Then, we have Red Mage's character sheet. Religion: Okay.
  • The Trenches:
    Manager: Ever been arrested?
    Isaac: Once.
    Manager: What for?
    Isaac: Breaking the law.
  • In Tales of the Questor Quentyn stumbles into his parent's kitchen to find Squidge, the bogey, sitting in the middle of a pie, snarfing it down doublehanded.
    Quentyn Squidge, what are you doing here?
    Squidge(looking around) Eatin' pie.
    Quentyn No, I mean— why are you in my mother's kitchen?
    Squidge Cause that where pie is.
  • Cyanide and Happiness loves these:
    Alien Thank you for repairing my ship human. You may ask me one question.
    Man Can it be about anything?
    Alien Yes. *disappears*
    • and a variation
    Yellow Shirt Whats wrong?
    Green Shirt My Uncle died of a heart attack.
    Yellow Shirt Jeez, I'm sorry, my heart goes out to your family.
    Green Shirt Really could of used that yesterday.
    • and another one
    Cyan Shirt What are you reading?
    Green Shirt A book.
  • Guilded Age:
    Gravedust: How did you sleep last night?
    Frigg: By puttin my head down on a pillow.
  • Subverted in one of the extra strips of Paranatural.
    Max: Mr. Starchman, can I go to the bathroom?
    Mr. Starchman: CAN you go to the bathroom?
    Max: Uh... may I go to the bathroom?
    Mr. Starchman: MAY you go to the bathroom?
Cut to the classroom turned into a mess, the teacher screaming while ripping his shirt open and the kids kneeling on the floor with their hands on their heads.
Max: WHAT DO YOU WANT ME TO SAY!?
  • In "Dumbing of Age", when Walky gives Dorothy flowers:
    Walky: Do you like them or is this just kinda cheesy?
    Dorothy: Yes.
  • Full Frontal Nerdity has this exchange:
    Frank: Lewis's character [will] become the random misfortune death-god.
    Shawn: Do you pray to him to get that kind of death or to avoid it?
    Lewis: Yes.
  • This Dinosaur Comics strip has the following exchange:
    Dromiceiomimus: What's 11 divided by 34.1?
    T-Rex: Um... a number?
    Utahraptor: Ah, the "not wrong but also not meaningfully correct" route!
    T-Rex: It's technically correct!
    Utahraptor: I believe you'll find someone who takes the risk of being wrong is preferred to someone who is never wrong but never says anything worth saying.
  • JL8:
    Diana: Wait, why are you giving Bruce flirty faces?
    Diana: Because you like him, or you like the fact that he owns horses?
    Karen: Yes.

    Web Original 
  • The Frequently Given Answers page makes a serious attempt to inform unsuspecting answer-seekers how to avoid this trope, when asking questions of places frequented mainly by the overly literal.
  • Spoony's take on the changes to Yuna between Final Fantasy X and Final Fantasy X-2.
    Spoony: Quite a long way from the traditional kimono she wore before, and her previous characterization as a kind, demure, religious care-giver with a tragic fate. But is this huge change in outfit and characterization because of the radical cultural shift in Spira because of the exposure of Yevon as a maniacal, genocidal cult run by the undead bent on world domination... or just because Japanese perverts want to see some cleavage and her cute ass in boyshorts? Good question... The answer is "Yes".
  • Dragon Ball Z Abridged:
    Butarega: King Vegeta, I have urgent news!
    King Vegeta: Speak, Butarega.
    Butarega: Bardock has gone absolutely mad, Sire!
    Bardock: FREEZA!!
    King Vegeta: What's all the commotion about?
    Butarega: He's been telling everyone that Freeza plans to destroy Vegeta!
    King Vegeta: Wait, my son, the planet, or me?
    Butarega: ...Yes.
    (Butarega is blasted by King Vegeta)
    King Vegeta: Freakin' smartass.
  • The titular ninja of Ask a Ninja loves to do this, especially during the "Omnibus" episodes.
    Question: What is integral theory?
    Ninja: Complicated.
    Question: Of all the ninja skills in the world, which is the deadliest?
    Ninja: The one that kills you.
  • In Episode 9 of Red Letter Media's Best of the Worst, the group's initial enjoyment of The Amazing Bulk, as Mike explains, is quickly extinguished by the question of whether the movie is a sincere attempt to make a visually stylized film in the vein of Sin City, an intentionally So Bad, It's Good movie in an effort to rival the popularity of Birdemic or The Room, or the straight mockbuster it appears to be.
    Jay: The answer is yes.
    Mike: Which one?
    Jay: Mmhmm.
  • Not Always Right
    • This exchange:
      Customer: I need a tire for a 2010 Honda Accord.
      Me: What do you have on there now?
      Customer: A flat tire.
    • This customer.
    • This one too. What does your camera take? Pictures!
  • The Ask That Guy sometimes gives these answers.
    Q: Are there any "dead" celebrities that you think are actually still alive?
    A: Yes.
  • During Linkara's "That Guy With The Hat" sketch (parodying Ask That Guy with the Glasses (mentioned above), "Can you tell me how to get back onto the freeway?" is answered "NO."
  • Skippys List offers the following;
    • Is that a squid in our shower?
    • Yep.
    • Whats it doing in there.
    • Thawing.
    • Goodnight.
  • Ultra Fast Pony. "Sister Angst" opens with Rarity's parents paying her house an unscheduled visit. At the episode's end, she finds they're still in her kitchen:
    Rarity: What are you two still doing here?
    Magnum: Sitting down?
    [beat]
    Rarity: Get out of my house.

    Western Animation 
  • Fred Fredburger once resolved a court case by saying "yes" to an either-or question, resulting in both parties winning. This was not on purpose.
  • Family Guy
    • A very funny example by the mayor of Quahog Adam West:
    Adam West: Will you answer one question for me?.
    Medium: Yes
    Adam West: Thank you so much.
    • West himself loves doing this:
    Tricia Takanawa: Mr. West, do you have any words for our viewers?
    Adam West: Box, toaster, aluminum, maple syrup... no I take that one back. I'm gonna hold onto that one.
    • He has it done to him in "Petoria'':
      (Peter is dancing in the park and generally causing a commotion.)
      Adam West: What in God's name is he doing?!
      Cleveland: I believe it's called the Worm.
  • In one episode of The Charlie Brown and Snoopy Show, Charlie Brown regains consciousness on a sidewalk as two little kids watch. Charlie gets up and asks one of the kids, "Where am I?" One of the kids points to him and says, "Right there!"
  • Avatar The Last Airbender: In the Grand Finale, a conflicted Aang calls upon the spirit of his past incarnation, Avatar Roku, to advise him on whether he should kill Ozai. Roku's only advice is to "be decisive".
    • All of the Avatar spirits actually gave a Mathematician's Answer of one sort or another. Kyoshi said "only justice will bring peace", Kurik said to "actively shape the fate of the world", and Yangchen said "do whatever it takes to protect the world". All of these apply equally accurately to either killing Ozai or any number of other options that might have been attempted. In the end, a Lion Turtle taught him Energybending, which Aang used to strip Ozai of his Firebending and render him powerless, instead of killing him.
      • Which makes sense because Aang doesn't know the answer, and all the past Avatars ''are'' Aang.
      • Not so much with Roku, he did insist multiple times that Aang MUST kill Ozai. But that was mostly Roku's own guilt at not stopping Sozin during his own time as Avatar.
  • In The Legend of Korra, Korra's cousin Eska has this exchange with Bolin shortly after they meet.
    Eska: "You amuse me. I will make you mine."
    Bolin: "You mean like a boyfriend or a slave?"
    Eska: "Yes. Now win me prizes."
  • Rocky and Bullwinkle provides us with another example. Boris, in one of his Paper Thin Disguises, needs Bullwinkle to go to a particular location. His scheme is to have Bullwinkle win a trip in a contest. The trick, then, is to get the exceedingly dense Bullwinkle to actually give the correct answer to a question, which he finally accomplishes with this exchange.
    Boris: Do you know who is buried in Grant's tomb?
    Bullwinkle: No.
    Boris: That's right, you don't!
  • In Total Drama World Tour while lost in a desert in Egypt:
    Heather: Does anyone know where we are?
    Izzy: Plant Earth, silly.
  • The Simpsons
    • A variation on the theme, but still very much holds the original idea: When Bart and Milhouse get their own warehouse, Milhouse is left behind as a night watchman. Bart comes back the next day to find the place destroyed.
      Bart: Milhouse, how could you let this happen? You were supposed to be the night watchman!
      Milhouse: I was watching. I saw the whole thing. First it started falling over, then it fell over.
    • Homer managed one of these accidentally.
      German man: You've been safety inspector for three years. What initiatives have you spearheaded in that time?
      Homer: Uh... all of them?
      German man: You must have lots of ideas for the future?
      Homer: I sure do!
  • On an episode of Garfield and Friends in a U.S. Acres segment, Wade is being his usual cowardly self, this time about seeing a doctor. Orson tries to reassure him, but Roy can't miss an opportunity to have a laugh at his expense.
    Orson: Doctors are your friend Wade, they'd never hurt you, but Roy here would. Wait a minute, Roy, you're not a doctor!
    Roy: Sure I am! I operated a guy just yesterday for 900 dollars.
    Orson: What did he have?
    Roy: 900 dollars.
    Orson: No, no, what did you REMOVE from him?
    Roy: The 900 dollars!
    Orson: No, no, no, what was he COMPLAINING about? (finally getting it) Oh, wait...
    Roy and Orson: The 900 dollars.
    Orson: I guess you really are a doctor, Roy.
  • The Beavis and Butt-Head episode "Customers Suck" has a customer in Burger World ask if the shakes are made from real milk and ice cream or shake mix. Beavis just says "Yeah."
  • In the Spongebob Squarepants episode "Culture Shock", SpongeBob asks Squidward which brand of soap he should use: Mr. Cleanser or Dr. Clean? Squidward's response: "Yes."
  • Fred the squirrel from The Penguins of Madagascar, being Literal-Minded incarnate, has a bit of a problem with this. If he's asked if he can read something, he'll say "yes". If someone asks him to show them the town, he'll just point to the nearest buildings.
  • Phineas and Ferb co-creator Dan Povenmire was asked by a fan on Twitter "What is Ferb short for?" He responded, "Brevity's sake."
  • Used to answer an actual math question in an episode of Little Bear when Little Bear and Emily rope the 4 local Playful Otters into playing school with them. After trying to teach them how to count, Emily asks the otters how many of them there are. They each answer "1" — because "each of us is 1 otter!" There's a beat before Little Bear admits, "That's true..."

    Other 
  • Dictionaries and encyclopedias tend to do this if you look up the wrong tense of the word you're hoping to define.
    Disappropriation: n. The act of disappropriating.
  • From an old Marvel Comics trading card:
    Spider-Man: So your name is Logan. Is that your first or last name?
    Wolverine: Yup.
    • At the time, Wolverine's real name had yet to be revealed. He sometimes went by "Logan L. Logan". Guess what the "L." stands for.
  • A kōan of Zen Buddhism reads: A monk asked Zhozhōu, "Does a dog have Buddha nature or not?" Zhozhōu said, "W." This is a rare example in which the mathematician's answer is actually the most useful one. W essentially means "null",note  the point being that the monk asking the question is wrong to assume that the two dichotomous categories have any meaning.
    • W is also the sound a dog makes.
    • It's also a good answer to trick questions like "Have you stopped beating your wife?" Assuming you don't want to admit to having at any point beaten your wife.
  • The Eddie Izzard example so beloved of this page:
    Paris: Dad, found this woman!
    Priam: Whoa, where's she from?
    Paris: She's from Sparta!
    Priam: ...Agh, you twit. Nip upstairs, see if there are any ships on the horizon.
    Paris: Right. [he does] Uhh... Ships. Yeah, yeah, there's ships.
    Priam: Well, how many?
    Paris: *thinking noises* ...all of them.
  • The proper way to choose a cantaloupe has been described as: smell it, and if it smells like a cantaloupe, it is ripe enough. But it is a cantaloupe, so by definition, whatever it smells like, is what a cantaloupe smells like. Therefore, the only logical answer to "Does it smell like a cantaloupe?" is "Yes".
    • The provided description actually implies that an unripe cantaloupe does not smell anything at all.
      • Which is why outside of the U.S. they are known as a musk mellon. A proper cantaloupe as recognized by the rest of the world can't even be found in the U.S.
  • Robin Williams in his stand-up act when talking about calling tech support. When finally reaching a real person (who is Indian), this exchange takes place:
    Caller: (overjoyed) Where are you!?
    Tech support assistant: (heavy Indian accent) I am on the phone with you.
  • Back in about 2003, when Mark & Lard were still doing an afternoon show on BBC Radio 1, they used to run a phone-in quiz vaguely about music. Once, one of the questions was, "Can you name a member of Boyzone?" One of the callers jumped in with, "No." Technically, it was a correct answer...
  • If you got here from Internet Backdraft, you're probably wondering why "the cake is a lie, but pi is always true". The point of the joke is that in many settings, especially computer programming, "false" is represented by the value 0 and "true" by any other value. Pi isn't zero, so it's true. A related joke quoted on Bash.org:
    (morganj): 0 is false and 1 is true, correct?
    (alec_eso): 1, morganj
    (morganj): bastard.
  • Dara Briain did a bit about this in one of his stand-up shows, when the audience response to the question "Do you know what Moore's Law is?" was 'yes'.
  • There is a story about actress Mae West, who was famous for playing The Vamp.
    Interviewer: Do you like your men short, tall, fat, or thin?
    Mae West: Yes.
  • Then there's the old retort to "Can I ask you a question?" "You just did."
  • The "A or B? Yes" joke works in most languages because it's rather typical that only one word is used for both meanings of "or". It doesn't work in languages where there are separate words for them, for example Finnish ("tai" / "vai". The former means "or" as in "is it either A or B?" and the latter as in "which one is it: A or B?") In fact, Finnish also has a third word for "or": "eli" meaning specifically "also known as" or "in other words". One wonders if the early Finns just really hated the "or" jokes.
    • It's also difficult in Mandarin, but for a completely different reason: Chinese does not have all-purpose words for "yes" and "no," instead attaching positive or negative modifiers to the verb in question. If someone asks you even a single-mode question, like "Have you eaten" (吃 饭 了 "chī fn le?"), you have to say, 还 没 吃 Mi chī le (have not eaten) or "chī le" (already ate). ...Okay, people will still throw around 不 "b" without an attached verb, same as how English speakers will say "Went to the store" with only an implied subject, but it's still a bit harder to be ambiguous.
    • This also applies to Irish. Continuing the example, one would answer the question "Ar ith t?" (did you eat?) with "D'ith m" (I ate) or "Nor ith m" (I did not eat). Though, for practical purposes, the positive and negative modifiers in the continuous present tense of the verb to be ("b") often serve the role of yes and no ("t" or "sea" and "nl" or "n hea" respectively). Pronunciation Note .
    • The Indonesian language makes the standard mathematician's answer to "A or B?" a valid answer: If asked between A or B, saying yes implies agreeing to the latter, since it is said last. Most people will attempt to reconfirm afterwards, but those particularly mean-spirited/in the mood for pranks wouldn't, and will stick to their guns when asked about it.
    • The Japanese word for "yes", はい "hai", can mean either "yes" or "mhm, I'm listening". People doing business in Japan are regularly alerted to pay close attention to the context to avoid misunderstandings, since they won't always get a direct "no" to a proposition.
  • This is the reason some computer languages have the XOR keyword. "OR" evaluates to "true" if at least one of a set of options is true; "XOR" requires that exactly one be true.
    • In formal logic this is generally referred to as having an or (exclusive) and or (inclusive) operator. Most forms of symbolic logic shorthand have both, written longhand the former is usually constructed as "either... or..." and the latter as "... and/or ...". If the phrase is just written "or" the assumption is usually inclusive, though in less formal English obviously it's more context-sensitive.
    • Interestingly enough, this can still lead to a Mathematician's Answer. Q: "Is it black XOR white?" Yes: it's either one or the other. No: it's either both or neither.
    • Nick Hudson, in _Modern Australian Usage_ under or reports:
    in the early days of flying between Melbourne and Sydney, passengers were asked Tea or coffee? twice. (1) The first time, the correct answer was Yes (which got you the cup) or No. (2) The second time, the answer was Coffee or Tea (which got the cup filled. (3) If you were then asked whether you wanted to visit the flight deck or cockpit the answer was again yes or no, because no other choice was being offered; they were simply two terms for the same part of the aircraft.
  • You've probably met the occasional smartass who thought they were funny by using these. "What's for lunch?" "Food."
    • "What's up?" "The opposite of down/The ceiling/The sky/It depends on your orientation/etc."
  • Teachers see a lot of these, from students who can't come up with a relevant answer to a test question and opt to try for a laugh instead.
  • One that gets used a bit in direction-giving customer service roles:
    "Where's the men's room?"
    "Right next to the women's room."
  • Several Burt And I routines took this form.
    • "Why you so head-up, Tom?" "Oh, I had to shoot my dog." "Oh, was he mad?" "Guess he weren't too damn pleased."
    • "I'm going up to Portland." "Go ahead. I won't stop you." "Where does this road go?" "Don't go nowhere, mister. Stays right here." "Can I take this road up to Portland?" "Well, sure...but they've got all the roads up to Portland that they need."
    • "Sorry to hear they're burying your pa." "Got to. He's dead."
  • According to an urban legend, when the notorious bank robber Willie Sutton was asked why he robbed banks, he replied "Because that's where the money is." He denied ever saying this.
  • The footballer Mario Balotelli crashed his car in August 2010, with (~$8000) in the glove compartment. Asked why, he answered "Because I am rich."
  • Ren Magritte painting The Treachery of Images, which shows a pipe with the phrase, "Ceci n'est pas une pipe" (this is not a pipe) under it. It isn't a pipe; it is an image of a pipe. Later in life, Magritte made it clear that this was a Mathematician's Answer:
    The famous pipe. How people reproached me for it! And yet, could you stuff my pipe? No, it's just a representation, is it not? So if I had written on my picture "This is a pipe," I'd have been lying!
  • When asked why Mitt Romney failed to win the Presidency in 2012, Chris Christie said that the reason was simple: "He didn't get enough votes."
  • Likewise, P.J. O'Rourke's riposte to Jimmy Carter's stating in a memoir that "We needed a lot more volunteers in 1980!" was "Pal, what you needed was votes."
  • This conversation from Clients from Hell:
    Client: I want to print my logo on a t-shirt
    Me: Will the t-shirt white or coloured?
    Client: Yes.
    Me: is it white or coloured?
    Client: Oh! White!
    Me: Do you want the print to last long or is it just for an event?
    Client: OK.
  • Many times when a magician is asked how a trick is done, s/he will answer "Very carefully" or something similar.
  • Parents of small children might find the Mathematician's Answer handy when the kids ask questions about "the birds and the bees" before they are deemed ready to know (or if the parents are just too embarrassed to answer).
    Small Child: Mommy, where did I come from?
    Mom: I already told you, dear. From Kansas City.
    Older Child: Mom, if a man and a woman want to have a baby, what do they need to do?
    Mom: Well, first they need to go out and buy a crib, a high chair, maybe a rattle, etc.
  • When George Pickett was asked why Pickett's Charge (the most famous Confederate attack during The American Civil War) had failed, his answer was simple: "I've always thought the Yankees had something to do with it."note 
  • A letter published in the January 2014 issue of Car and Driver magazine was from a reader asking, "Can anyone tell me what Skyactiv technology actually does?" The editor's response? "Yes."
  • This post collects "38 Test Answers That Are 100% Wrong But Totally Genius At The Same Time."
  • If you ask a true Scotsman what he is wearing under his kilt, he may answer, "Shoes."
  • Hans Asperger, from whom we get Asperger Syndrome, once asked one of his subjects, a little girl who was playing with her toys, whether she could count to ten. She answered "Yes." Then she went back to playing with her toys.
  • Teachers in technical writing classes will sometimes use this to demonstrate just how hard it is to write with sufficient detail. They'll ask the class to instruct them to perform some mundane task, such as making a PB&J sandwich, and interpret the instructions as literally (and incorrectly) as possible. For example, if someone says simply "put the jelly on the bread", the teacher might place the jar of jelly on top of the bag of bread. This is also common in classes on logic, formal language and programming.
  • A gossip columnist sent a telegram to Cary Grant's studio asking "How Old Cary Grant?" Grant sent a reply telegram saying "Old Cary Grant Fine. How You?"

It's a third person singular neuter pronoun. But that's not important right now.


Masked LuchadorCharacterization TropesMeasuring the Marigolds
Magical Native AmericanThis Index Is A JokeMillennium Bug
Mangled Catch PhraseDialogueMeaningful Echo
Love You and EverybodyPoor Communication KillsMetaphorically True
Ice-Cream KoanCryptic ConversationMetaphorically True
Loving BullyImageSource/Western AnimationScreaming Birth

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