Foreign Re-Score

For whatever reason, be it legal issues or Creative Differences, a work gets completely re-scored when being released outside its country of origin. These may or may not happen with a bonus serving of No Export for You for the original soundtrack (and in some cases, the new soundtrack as well).

If the original music was done by a separate band (not in-house), then an entire separate license needs to be drawn up for the music, apart from the work itself. In some cases, the band may flat-out refuse, or they may demand huge royalties that would double the expense of porting the work.

Supertrope to Alternative Foreign Theme Song.


Examples:

Anime and Manga
  • 4Kids Entertainment was notorious for doing this with pretty much all of their shows in addition to their general editing (Pokémon was an exception, at least for a few of the earlier seasons). Notably, in Sonic X, during the Sonic Adventure 2 arc, the game's theme "Live and Learn" kicked in during the climatic ending, but 4Kids completely axed the music and replaced it with their usual faux orchestra music, removing a lot of the impact.
  • Joe Hisaishi, a veteran composer of Studio Ghibli, was hired to re-score Castle in the Sky for its late 1990's release by Disney. Though Disney's version of the film was not available in Japan (until the recent BD release), it's the only place that soundtrack can be bought.
  • The Mysterious Cities of Gold was re-arranged for the French version by Haim Saban because the show's creator Jean Chalopin felt that the Japanese score was not adventurous enough. The latter score was considered for the English dub but was discarded in favor of the French soundtrack. Both soundtracks are cases of No Export for You in that the French score never made it to Japan and the Japanese score was never used elsewhere.
  • The Funimation dubs of Dragon Ball Z have the original music replaced with a guitar-heavy rock soundtrack. This has caused a certain amount of "Macekre vs. Woolseyism" debating, since many Western fans feel the dub soundtrack fits the action much better.
  • Saban (and later Disney)'s dubs of Digimon.
  • The DiC-Optimum English dub of the first two seasons of Sailor Moon used a completely new soundtrack. Clover and Optimum's dub of the later seasons retained the original soundtrack.
  • Fox's broadcast of The Vision of Escaflowne contained a mix of new music and music from the original score, but the original music was usually played in completely different scenes from where it had originally appeared.
  • After TPC took over as the English dubbers to Pokémon, they made more of an effort to stay true to the Japanese scores. Though, that doesn't mean that they kept in all of the soundtracks. While not as bad as 4kids, they changed up a lot of the series' score.

Film — Animation
  • In Toy Story 2, "The Star-Spangled Banner" played when Buzz gave a motivational speech as the American flag faded in behind him. For foreign releases, it was replaced with an original piece as the visual changed to a rotating globe with fireworks.

Film — Live Action
  • The song "Yerushalayim Shel Zahav" ("Jerusalem of Gold") is featured in the Schindler's List soundtrack and plays during a key moment near the end of the film. This caused some controversy in Israel when the film was released because the song was written in 1967 and is widely known in Israel as a pop and folk song. The song was therefore edited out of the Israeli release of the film and replaced by the song "Eli, Eli", which was written by the Jewish Hungarian poet Hannah Szenes during World War II and is more appropriate for the time period and subject matter of the film.
  • Mike Shinoda worked on a new soundtrack to The Raid (released in the US as The Raid: Redemption).
  • International releases of Gone with the Wind had a different prologue scroll that was meant to explain the Civil War to foreign audiences. So, instead of a slow, choral rendition of "Dixie", the international version used a bombastic rendition of "Battle Hymn of the Republic".
  • For the US release of The Neverending Story, Klaus Doldinger's classical orchestra soundtrack was replaced in large parts by a synthesizer-based soundtrack by Giorgio Moroder.

Live Action TV
  • One of the two German-language dubs of Hogan's Heroes replaces the entire soundtrack except for the closing theme with what sounds like 8-bit MIDI versions.

Theatre
  • Show Boat:
    • British productions almost invariably replace Frank and Ellie's Trocadero number, "Good-bye, Ma Lady Love," with "How'd You Like To Spoon with Me?" The latter song, unlike the other old Victorian and Edwardian songs used in this scene, was composed by Jerome Kern (in 1905).
    • The 1928 Drury Lane production had a newly-written Eleven O'Clock Number for Kim, "Dance Away the Night." This was heard in British productions but not in American ones until the 1994 Broadway revival threw in a snippet of it played over a radio.

Video Games
  • Sonic CD is well-known for replacing the original soundtrack by Naofumi Hataya et al with new music composed by Spencer Nilsen for the US release (most likely due to licensing issues with the theme songs' performers). Europe, meanwhile, got the Hataya soundtrack for the Mega CD version. The PC version used the Nilsen soundtrack in all regions, while Gems Collection used it in the US and Europe (but retained the Hataya soundtrack in Japan). It looked like getting the Hataya soundtrack in the US would be a case of No Export for You, until an Updated Re-release for most consoles of the seventh generation was released with both soundtracks in all regions (sans lyrics for the Hataya's theme songs, due to licensing issues).
  • Guilty Gear XX #Reload has an entirely new soundtrack for the Korean release composed by Sin Hae Chul. It's considered to be just as good as the original soundtrack.
  • Shinobi Legions had an all-new score done for the European release by Richard Jacques.
  • Mega Man has a history of doing this:
    • Mega Man 8 and Mega Man X3 have full vocalized songs in their original Japanese releases, which were replaced with different tunes when brought over to the West.
    • The Under the Sea stage for Mega Man X5 (also known as Duff Mcwhalen/Tidal Whale's stage) has a completely original soundtrack in the Japanese version, but in the North American/Non-Japan version, it's a remix of Bubble Crab's stage music from Mega Man X2.
  • X-Kaliber 2097 had all the music from the Japanese version (Sword Maniac) replaced with tracks from Psykosonik's Self-Titled Album for Activision's international release.
  • Crash Bandicoot 3: Warped: The Japanese release for the game has an alternative soundtrack made by Mutato Muzika.

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