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Fandomberserk Button

In every community for every series, there are common mistakes. Someone could use the wrong spelling of a character's name, or think that the title referred to the main character, or insist on spreading a rumor about the plot until everyone believes it.

To certain fans, this can get annoying. Enough that people that continue to perpetuate it are treated with the same respect as a Troll, although many times they merely made an honest mistake. As the following examples demonstrate, however, many other times the purists are not railing against mistakes, but against things which are not technically wrong, such as dub names, simply because they happened to dislike the alternate adaptation.

See Also: Cowboy Bebop at His Computer, Fandom Heresy, I Am Not Shazam, Internet Backdraft, Refrain from Assuming, Serious Business, and Flame Bait.


Examples

    open/close all folders 

    General 

  • In fanfiction, having a non-British character refer to their mother as "Mum" will anger a lot of people as well the inverse (e.g. seeing "Mom" in a Harry Potter fanfic)
  • Spelling a major character's name wrong is probably the worst sin a fanfiction can make according to some people and can ruin a well-written story.
  • Crossing over a franchise into ponies with a fanfic is a pretty good way to end up with some flak at some point or another from a rabid fan. Sometimes even the mention of the show can cause a flamewar to erupt, if you aren't careful.
  • May the heavens help you if you dare claim that animation is just for kids in the earshot of a cartoon fan.
  • Don't base customs of any institution set in another country or world on how things are in your own country. For example, summer vacation in Japan is much shorter than in America and does not coincide with the interlude between school years. The latter takes place exclusively within March, and graduation ceremonies are held in April.
    • This holds also true for holidays and traditions associated with it. July 4th isn't a holiday in the UK and Germany's thanksgiving is on a different date and celebrated differently and so on.

    Anime & Manga 
  • Go to an anime convention and call it a "cartoon". Go ahead and try. We dare you.
    • Nowadays the opposite is pretty true as well. Try talking to anime fans with the belief that anime are not cartoons.
  • This can, on rare occasions, be inverted in the anime fandom, with posters saying "You aren't Japanese, so stop using the Japanese names." While certainly some are just elitist, some just use the original name or spelling because they like it better or if it's just what they're used to. There's also the problem some newer members of the fandom may have with correct pronunciation, potentially making it difficult to figure out what they're talking about.

    It can also be inverted in real life, when hardcore fans or self-professed Internet scholars attempt to use the "original" Japanese name for anime/game characters around people who have only watched/played the Western version of said show/game, and are completely bashed for being total dorks. Another example suggests that you should never use the Western names for Pac-Man ghosts when taking part in online Pac-Man fan conversations — a corollary to that should be that you're better off not using anything OTHER than the Western names (more specifically, the nicknames Inky, Blinky, Pinky, and Clyde) when talking about Pac-Man to 90% of the people you will actually meet in real life.

    In English-speaking circles, going out of one's way to use the Japanese words for things that are typical of anime in general when the English equivalent would suffice is considered to reflect poorly on the speaker; for instance, saying you dig vampire catgirls isn't a big dealnote , but going to the trouble of saying kyuuketsuki nekomimikko will put you on the Chumptrain to Douchetown.
  • On the OTHER hand, using English terms for certain anime/manga series rather than the original Japanese terms is liable to get you lynched by the purists. Specific examples are listed below.
  • And to add to the fustercluck, the very existence of Spell My Name with an S means incorrect translations are an inevitability. Nonetheless, many fans will lash at anyone who uses a different translation, even if the later mentioned translation is more accurate. Some of the aforementioned hardcore fans are bashed simply because they don't have as good a grasp of Japanese as they think they do.
  • Many fan-translations (and by extension their followers) are militant in their use of Japanese equivalents of a word whenever possible, and occasionally reverse-translate portions of a manga (e.g. changing Lordgenome into Genome-sama for Tengen Toppa Gurren Lagann, when it was originally the former, and changing "perverted" to ecchi in other manga when it damages a normal readers ability to understand the text).
    • This led to the "Just According to Keikaku" memenote , due to a particularly prevalently misunderstood parody gag-sub of Death Note, where the subber would leave Japanese words randomly in people's sentences, with a separate note on what the word meant. This obviously made reading it for the short time it was on screen a bit of a chore.
  • Yu-Gi-Oh! communities, especially those with a heavy population of OCG players, get rather snippy whenever someone doesn't use the "proper" name for a character or card. Woe betide anyone who calls "Saint Dragon — The God of Osiris" by the American name, "Slifer the Sky Dragon"... okay, so "Slifer" is a pretty silly name for a God Card, and it has a really stupid origin, but lighten up, people...
    • It lives on when people watch this guy's subtitling of Yu-Gi-Oh! 5Ds. The rule of thumb: when watching a Japanese version of the show, use the Japanese names and terminology. Countless people have been marked as spam just because they refuse to use "Aki Izayoi" or "D-Wheel" and instead use "Akiza Izinski" and "Duel Runner". Some in the fandom find this particularly annoying because like its predecessors before it, almost every term has been changed, seemingly for no apparent reason. There are certain YGO fans who will rip you a new one if you call a character by their dub name.
  • Though she was initially called "Dark Chii" by fans due to No Name Given for a large part of the manga, call Freya that to any Chobits fan's face and feel the wrath of the heavens descend upon you. Whether the name should be written as Chi or Chii is also an issue with some.
  • A similar reaction happens among Death the Kid fangirls from the Soul Eater fandom. It's a tossup, but there is still an ongoing debate about the spelling. It's either "Kid" or "Kidd", but still...
  • Happens in the Dragon Ball fandom. People who use certain names over other tend to get looked at as filthy dub fans. It's not Master Roshi, it's Kame-sennin! Hercule? You moron, it's Mr. Satan! Who's Frieza? I think you mean Freezer. And so on, and so forth.
    • For a while, some compromise-minded fans put forth the admitted bit of Fan Wank that perhaps his first name is Hercule, making his full name "Hercule Satan," which worked okay... until Word of God revealed that "Mr. Satan" is a stage name and his real name is... Mark. So much for that.note 
    • There are also the so-called purists who insist of saying "Saiyajin" instead of "Saiyan", since the latter is an "Americanized" term. ("Saiyajin", in Japanese, means "someone from Saiya"; "Saiyan", in English, means... "someone from Saiya".) However, the Anglicization of "Saiyajin" to "Saiyan" was first used by Bandai for their Super Battle Collection action figures, which predated any of the American adaptations.
      • Even if you manage to get past THAT, you run into the debate over whether the first syllable should be pronounced like the word "say" (American dub) or "sigh" (Japanese).
      • The English Dub references this at one point by having Buu mispronounce "Saiyan" as "Saiyajin."
      • People who will call the hero "Son Goku" as opposed to just Goku, and Kuririn instead of Krillin.
      • It should be noted that some dubs, such as the Lat Am one, are translated directly from the original Japanese version, and keep the original names such as Saiyajin, Mr. Satan or Freezer. If you talk to a Latin American DBZ fan, take this in mind.
    • Treating GT as canon is another good way to get people to flame you.
      • Treating the movies or filler as canon is another mistake. Some circles go so far as to discourage discussion of the anime at all, as the only true canon is the manga.
      • And on another bizarre note, in the circles that do support the movies, don't you dare claim that anyone is even a little bit stronger than Broly.
  • Referring to Anthy Himemiya (of Revolutionary Girl Utena) as "Anshii" has been known to instill homicidal rages in fans of the show, due to "Anshii" being nothing more than a Japanese pronunciation of the actual Greek name (seeing as Japanese does not have a "th" sound so has to approximate it with a "shii").
  • Sailor Moon:
    • Referring to the original characters using the North American dubbed anime names. Many fans will ignore you or worse (some will wish/inflict physical harm upon you). However, this has been mediated these days, with fifteen years of rage slowly giving way to admitted nostalgia.
    • Say that Uranus and Neptune are cousins. You will get one of two reactions: people wanting to strangle you or calling you homophobic, or laughing at you for not picking up on the subtext or, for that matter, being aware of the homophobic censorship in the North American dub (which has reached almost memetic status in the Sailor Moon fandom by this point). Similarly, insisting that Zoisite is a woman and that Zoisite and Kunzite/Malachite are a heterosexual couple.
  • Call the characters of Tokyo Mew Mew by their Tokyopop or 4Kids names (or, for that matter, calling the show by its 4Kids name, Mew Mew Power). Go on. For an added bonus, try doing it anywhere on this site. (Go to the archive.)
  • Do NOT call Roronoa Zoro "Zolo". Ever. Unless you want everyone at the forum you visit (with the obvious exception of 4KidsTV's) to hate you. Also, never ever refer to Monkey D. Luffy as simply "Monkey". Other name changes provoke similar reactions.
    • What if you know his name is l'Olonnois Zorro? (it would have two Rs but for reasons; Word of God admits he's named after that Zorro)
    • There are plenty of One Piece fans who go absolutely berserk if you use the English translations of the Devil Fruit or attack names, insisting the terms are sacrosanct and must never be changed. And then there's nakama. Yeah...
    • Saying that the Funimation dub is even remotely similar to the infamous 4Kids dub is a great way to piss off the Funi fans. Even worse is if you confuse the two and think that 4Kids is still doing the dub, or attribute their mistakes to Funimation.
  • Death Note
    • Calling the series "Deathnote", rather than Death Note, usually doesn't go over well.
    • Many fans of the show tend to call Light "Raito". This is the most understandable of the romaji transliterations, as early translations used Raito, but it gets really crazy when fans talk about "Ryuuku" and "Nia" and "Eru". There has even been "Desu Noto" floating around... fans are calling characters with English names the romaji spelling of their names. These "fans" are typically called out for their militant purism, especially since the "keikaku" fiasco (mentioned above).
  • CLAMP and Tsubasa Reservoir Chronicle fans often get pissed off when someone calls the series Tsubasa Chronicle. See, the anime is called Tsubasa Chronicle and it was beyond awful. It was so bad CLAMP themselves disowned it; in the fandom's mind, calling it Tsubasa Chronicle most likely means you have only seen the anime.
    • An aversion is just how to the hell you're supposed to spell Fay's name. It's pronounced Fai (rhymes with "eye") but officially written in as Fay in English, but the English translation had already used Fai for volumes when they realized the mistake and basically responded "Whatever", and the fandom reaction was to spell it however they wanted. And don't even get us started on his last name.
    • And then there's bringing up Vic Mignogna, the voice of Fay in the English dub, due to some controversial comments he made about Fay's sexual orientation that he claimed came directly from CLAMP themselves. A decent portion of the fandom considers him a Persona Non Grata, to the point that one tag on the LiveJournal CLAMP Rants community is literally "vic mignogna eats kittens".
  • InuYasha: The name of Inuyasha's sword is the Tessaiga, not Tetsusaiga. It's spelled with a small "tsu" character, which is not read as "tsu", but doubles the following consonant.
    • There's also the occasional spat over the pronunciation of the cat-demon's name: the romaji says "Kirara"; the English dub says "Kilala" (which frankly is much easier to say).
    • For that matter, whether to spell "O" sounds as "O" or "Ou". Some INSIST that it's ALWAYS "Ou", others ALWAYS "O". It's actually a case-by-case basis; the original Japanese spelling may include a "U" symbol, or it may not. There is an audible difference in how the two are pronounced, but many non-Japanese-speakers can't distinguish them, which adds to the confusion about the matter.
  • Whether you're talking about Naruto, Cardcaptor Sakura, Street Fighter, Bludgeoning Angel Dokuro-chan, or any anime, manga, video game, or anything in general — the name Sakura is pronounced SAH-ku-rah, not suh-KOO-ruh, and some fans will be unforgiving if this name is said incorrectly.
    • On the subject of Naruto, try calling it "nay-roo-toh" or "nuh-roo-doh" instead of "nah-roo-toh". Oh yeah, and...Believe it.
    • Antagonist "Pain" was originally mistranslated as "Pein" by fan-subbers. This did not stop some fans from growing attached to the "Pein" spelling, much to the ire of some fans. The two names are pronounced the same, not helping the matter at all.
      • This mistranslation caused an even bigger problem in the German fanbase. "Pein", the transliteration of katakana ペイン, just happened to be an actual German word that translates to "anguish", "torment" and - you guessed it - "pain". However, its pronunciation is actually closer to the "pine" in "pine-tree" instead of "pain", which led to a lot of people mispronouncing his name, to some fans' chagrin. It also didn't help matters that some fans thought "Pain" was just a transliteration of his name instead of the English word and pronounced it accordingly, which incidentally sounds exactly like the German word "Pein".
  • Don't call Ryuzaki from Daimos Richard on any anime forum or you are in trouble.
    • So calling him "Kelly Hunter" would be right out, then?
    • Unless you're from the Philippines, in which case most who grew up watching Daimos (or Voltes V) would correct you politely whenever you use their Japanese names.
  • According to some older, more purist fans, a certain series is spelled "Chrno" Crusade and not "Chrono" Crusade. However, Word of God has admitted that "Chrno" was a mistake on Daisuke Moriyama's part, and by the time he noticed it was too late to change it. Recent reprintings of the manga in Japan call it "Chrono Crusade".

    "Chrno" can cause some confusion, too, if you misread the ch as the one from "child" not the one from "chaos". Coincidentally, "czrno" is the Slavic word for "black"... which is also what "Kurono" means in Japanese.
  • Fullmetal Alchemist
    • Spelling the (obviously western) names of the Elric brothers Ed and Al as Edo and Aru after the Japanese mispronunciation due to a lack of -d and -l sounds in the Japanese language will automatically brand you as a noob among Fullmetal Alchemist fans.
    • Some people used to insist that there was a character named Edvard Elric in the Fullmetal Alchemist series, who lived in "Amestria" or even "Shamballa". As you can guess, the former shows up infrequently online where text is far more common than speech, but the rest were fairly common amongst almost-but-certainly-not fans at one time.
    • Also, you probably shouldn't call Al a robot. A) because he's not, he's a soul bound to a suit of armor, and B) because several fandom members will get mad at you.
    • It's "Riza". Not "Liza", "Risa", or "Lisa".
  • Neon Genesis Evangelion
    • Is it Gendo, Gendou or Gendoh Ikari? Ryoji or Ryohji Kaji? Asuka Soryu or Sohryu? The list goes on. This debate is mostly just a microcosm of a debate that can make language forums run ankle-deep in blood: Which Romanization scheme to use for Japanese? It's even uglier for Korean (and there, there's also an asinine "don't romanize at all" thing, because apparently only hangeul can even approximate Korean's sacred phonemes).

      Given how much chaos can be caused by conflicting romanization schemes, the "Don't romanize at all" thing may simply be a result of getting fed up with having to figure out from examples which romanization scheme is being used this time, which means practically that if you don't have one very dominant, you have to learn all the schemes for the language. Meanwhile, just using the original writing system means the only romanization scheme anybody needs to know is the romanization scheme they use – and/or the one you have to use to type in the language.
    • Pronunciation of the title also sets off arguments, especially when the original Greek is brought into the mess.
    • And then there's all the remaining confusion over half of what was going on due to a lot of additional material that never got translated and brought over. Even when it was brought over via word-of-mouth, some fans refuse to accept any of it as canon.
    • Please don't bring up that you believe that Shinji and Kaworu were more than just really close friends or if Kaworu even has any knowledge about human sexuality. You will either be accused of being a stupid Yaoi Fangirl who doesn't care about the series or if you disagree you will be called a homophobe who is against their happiness. There is no winning if the topic is ever brought up. This goes on despite director Hideaki Anno (who is usually infamous for his Shrug of God) confirming that yes, Shinji and Kaworu's relationship was romantic.
  • Hardcore Rurouni Kenshin fans really tend to hate anybody who calls it "Samurai X". Funnily enough, the author likes that term and referenced it on his next work, Busou Renkin.
    • And then there's the hardcore fans that saw it in Latin Spanish. It's called Samurai X.
    • Just for fun, try saying to hardcore fans that you liked the Reflections OAV. As a bonus, say that you preferred it to the manga's ending. Get ready to face an oncoming frenzy of rabid fans out for your blood.
  • The two girls in Please Twins! are not the twins, and assuming they are may be hazardous to your health. It's actually about two girls who each believe themselves to be the sister of the male lead, and wind up in a Three's Company sort of sitch until they figure out which is which. The twin is Karen. Or Miina. Depends on whether you're talking about the show/manga or the light novels, respectively.
  • Pronouncing the word "Eureka" in Eureka Seven as anything but ee-oou-reck-ah will cause certain fans to cringe. Even when you're talking about Eureka, an entirely different series.
    • Doubly facepalm-inducing when you learn that that awkward pronunciation was forced on the localizers by the Japanese (they'd wanted to use the standard "yoo-REE-kuh"), and also that the actual proper pronunciation of the word, taken from the original Greek, is supposed to be something along the lines of "HEOO ray kah" (εὕρηκα). Note the "h" at the beginning (the initial vowel is aspirated). Also, "eu" isn't quite a diphthong; blend the "eh" and "oo" together, but not entirely. (Modern Greek is another story entirely; the word is pronounced (approximately) "EF ree kah".)
  • For a Ranma ˝ fan, the use of 'Nermia' is akin to a boot to the head.
  • Chances are, if you mention Robotech, you're going to have to listen to why Robotech sucks, why Harmony Gold sucks, why it ruined Macross forever, and a number of other things that usually don't relate to the other two series Robotech used. Even if it's a Robotech video on Youtube...
    • Nearly every single Macross video has at least one Robotech basher who just randomly starts the bashing without any provocation or anyone mentioning Robotech before the basher does.
      • And then you get the oddballs who agree that Robotech has the superior backstory (a la the novels), while Macross has the superior story-proper.
    • You also have people who support Macross II over Macross Seven being the continuation of the original series - Macross II coming first and being closer in tone to the original Macross with the eerily-human Marduk as the villains, while Seven veers dangerously close to Super Robot, with the Protodevlin being generic "evil alien monsters" helps tremendously; however, 7 was much more popular in Japan and Macross Plus, maybe the most beloved installment outside of the original series, uses 7's mythos as the background for the story.
    • Also whether Super Dimension Fortress Macross or Do You Remember Love is the "real" Macross. Visually, DYRL is considered canon, while the show's story canon, as referenced in Macross Frontier using the DYRL character designs in story-only situations in flashbacks. Still doesn't stop the fandom from raging.
      • To that end, whether there are only Zentraedi, male or female, or whether then males only are Zentraedi and the females are Maltrandi, in all other installments in the series.F
  • "Hardcore" fans of the Kirby anime will be rather annoyed if you refer to the Holy Nightmare Corporation as N.M.E. or eNeMeE or any other way you want to spell it. Calling Nightmare himself that is right out, and justifiably so, as people really should know the name of the final boss of Kirby's Adventure is not NME. You can probably get away with using the other 4Kids character names though.
  • On at least one forum, posters can be targeted by cries of "NEGIMA BANNED!!" for calling Negi's mother Akira or referring to his cousin Nekane as his biological sister. Generally, though, Negima fans seem fairly understanding, because there's a lot to keep track of...
  • Tales from Earthsea runs into this trope. Most purist fans insist on referring to the film by its Japanese name, Gedo Senki. In fact, most Studio Ghibli films get this treatment from the purist minority. The most notable example of fans' refusal to use an English name is Princess Mononoke (referred to almost universally as Mononoke-hime), with Spirited Away (Sen to Chihiro no Kamikakushi) third most likely to suffer from this).
    • Castle in the Sky is a strange case. The original Japanese title, Tenkuu no Shiro Rapyuta, was changed for its Western release because the official romanization of the castle, "Laputa" (pronounced LA-pyu-ta), looks an awful lot like "la puta" (Spanish for "the whore"). Nevertheless, purists fans invariably call the film "Laputa" and get angry when you don't know what they're talking about.
  • Fairy Tail features a currently raging debate over several characters names (Mistgun vs Mystogan, Luxus vs Laxus, Gazille vs Gajeel, Gerard vs Jellal, and Erza vs Ezra vs Elsa vs Elza.), and while a lot of fans will make the translation in their heads and leave it alone, there are some who will rip your spine out if you use the wrong one.
  • Don't ever call Bleach's Sexta Espada "Grimmjaw". You. Will. Be. ANNIHILATED. People also take issue with most of the Espada's names (partially because they released an official Romanization for their names long after they were introduced). Nnoitra Jiruga is officially Romanized as Nnoitora Gilga, and Szayel Aporro is officially one word, but most people still call them by their original names. Before that was Harribel, incorrectly called Halibel, and Baraggan, which is such a subtle change from Barragan that people probably didn't notice the difference.
    • After you've recovered from the beatings, try asking why Ichigo's sword has a swastika on it in the company of some Bleach fans. Go ahead and do it; I'll just go over here and call 911 for you.
  • Debate on the correct Romanization of Hellsing character Seras Victoria's name can get nasty. Some alternate spellings are Celes, Celas, and Ceres. That's not even to mention confusion over whether Victoria is her surname (in the British order) or her given name (in the Japanese order).
  • In Magical Girl Lyrical Nanoha, due to the nature of Nanoha's intelligent device's usage and partly due to some subtitling errors and pronunciation difficulties, some fans assert that the said device's name is RAGING Heart rather than RAISING Heart. It doesn't help that the English dub used both terms.
  • Many people who got into Wandering Son by the anime think Chiba's full name is "Chiba Saorin". "Saorin" is actually a nickname used by Sasa, her name is "Saori". "-rin" is often added to a female friends name in Japan. Fans will make you notice if you call her that.
    • Pronouns are a serious thing in the fandom. Calling Nitori or Makoto male is a terrible offense.
  • Listing Strawberry Panic! as your favorite yuri will sort of brand you as a noob to the genre, since, while popular, it's well-known to anyone who has watched/read more than a few yuri series that it's an Affectionate Parody of the genre that takes a lot of its plots and characters from other series.
  • Similarly, Maria-sama Ga Miteru is a Base Breaker that a lot of Girls Love fans consider too tame due to the lack of explicit romance between the girls. It also makes you seem rather new to the series because it's the Girls Love series..
  • Berserk: it's "Guts", not "Gatsu", ok?
    • Since the official releases are generally considered to have pretty good translations, fans who came into the series through scanslations are typically looked down upon for using incorrect character names.
    • It doesn't help that the author's preferred Romanizations often look... kind of dumb to Western eyes.
  • Calling Pokémon Special "the Pokemon manga" is guaranteed to get you berated in many circles.
  • Black★Rock Shooter: Mistaking the title character for a recolored Hatsune Miku. This one is a mess, because BRS was created independently of Miku, but their coincidental similar appearances led to the creation of a BRS-themed Miku song by a famous producer, which was the Colbert Bump that got the franchise going. Besides that song, they are not related; but people still get them confused for obvious reasons, and the fans of both franchises get pretty annoyed when it happens.
  • The Lucky Star girls are not preteens; they're in high school. Calling them ten or eleven years old will not sit well with some fans.
    • And it's Lucky Star, not Lucky Stars. And no, it does not refer to anything or anyone in-universe, so don't make the mistake of calling the girls Lucky Stars.
  • Tell any Digimon fan that Digimon is a rip-off of Pokemon and you'll likely be torn apart.
  • Don't go onto FUNimation (or any other anime distributor)'s Facebook page and ask them to make more of a certain anime. They do not make anime, they simply license and distribute it.

    Comic Books 
  • There's sometimes confusion about whether it's Watchmen or "The Watchmen". This provoked a lot of fan-rage when the movie came out, especially because "watchmen" was an Arc Word in the comic, and became the name of a superhero team in the movie. (In the comic, Captain Metropolis's team is called "The Crimebusters")
  • Spider-Man's title gets this a lot. As Friends helpfully explains:
    Phoebe: "Why isn't it 'Spiderman'? You know, like Goldman, Silverman?"
    Chandler: "Because it's not his last name."
    Phoebe: "It isn't?"
    Chandler: "No, it's not like he's Phil Spiderman. He's a SPIDER <beat> MAN. You know, like 'Goldman' is a last name, but there's no 'Gold-man'."
    • This isn't helped by the fact that "Spiderman" is the actual name of the official newspaper comic.
  • This sometimes happens regarding Lex Luthor's name in Superman media, particularly Justice League Unlimited. A talk show host interviewing Luthor, who happens to be running for President at the time, pronounces it Luther, while in another episode Superman gets it right by forcing the 'thor' part.
  • Making character calls about the modern versions of DC superheroes by using evidence from before Crisis on Infinite Earths (unless you're talking about a large number of specific characters who died during/weren't rewritten by the event) is a great way to get everyone on the forum to laugh their asses off. Also, mixing up which of said rewritten characters had their pasts completely wiped, which ones were rebooted in a modern setting, and which ones had their continuity subjected to Broad Strokes, and how broad those strokes are for each character and each past event, will earn you just as much ridicule. Yes, keeping up with comic continuity is widely known to be a bitch, but this is widely considered basic knowledge that comes right after figuring out which characters belong to Marvel and which to DC.
  • In general for the DC comics, mixing up characters. Many different people have gone by the same superhero, though in general movies and cartoons stick to one character (for example Dick Grayson is almost always Robin).
  • Batman has Ra's Al Ghul. His name was originally meant to be pronounced 'Raesh', this from Denny O'Neil who did his research (his daughter asked her college professor). In Batman Begins it's pronounced 'Rahs' or 'Roz'. Pronouncing it in any way other than 'Raesh' will attract much ire from the fans. Nolan was (falsely) accused of racism for allegedly making everyone deliberately mispronounce the name because he didn't want the original Arabic pronounciation in his movie.
    • This is lampshaded in Batman Beyond, where Terry pronounces Ra's as 'Rahs' only to be corrected by Talia.
  • In any incarnation of the X-Men, misspelling 'Rogue' as 'Rouge'
  • In regards to Mirage Comics-based Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (or the early IDW issues), asking why all of the Turtles are wearing red, or "why they're all Raph", or any indication that their original bandana color is weird and foreign.
    • Likewise, mixing up the Turtles' names, or calling something that's not even one of their names ("Galileo", "Yoda", etc.)
    • One's preference for or against Venus, the female Turtle from the short-lived live-action series, is also a way to set off loaded guns in any given room/board of Turtles fans.
    • Raph and Mikey tend to get their shortened names spelled wrong—as 'Ralph' and 'Mickey'.
  • For Wonder Woman fans, WW or the Amazons being depicted as Straw Feminists. Also, the Amazons getting massacred, yet again.
  • A general one for DC Comics fans, but a major one for fans of the character himself is to call Aquaman useless.
  • "So why doesn't Batman just kill The Joker?" This has been such a sticky subject for fans that comic writers and even the Batman Arkham Series has adapted this topic.
  • For fans of the Disney Ducks Comic Universe, featuring Donald Duck and Uncle Scrooge, particularly old-school fans of Carl Barks' work: Referring to the comics as "DuckTales comics" or primarily associating characters like Scrooge, Gyro or the Beagle Boys with DuckTales is a sure recipe for a fan rant.

    Computing 
  • Calling a Mac a "MAC" will earn you the ire of Apple fans.note  Same with calling the iPod "IPOD," "I-POD," or "Ipod."
    • In an episode of House, "Coma Guy" (a man who had been in, well, a coma for a long time) once picked up Wilson's and said "What's this? It says Ip-Odd."
    • Don't call the company "Mac" or say "Mac" when you meant to say "Apple" (Ex: Calling an Apple Store "The Mac Store"). The Mac is a product of a company called Apple.
  • Among programmers, making a Perl/PERL/PEARL/Pearl/perl mistake can lead to someone losing all credibility. In general, the capitalization thing for computer language names can get sticky. Especially for older languages, which had a tendency to start life as all caps abbreviations and then become mixed case in later standardization efforts. LISP ("LISt Processing") and FORTRAN ("FORmula TRANslating System") are now just Lisp and Fortran.
    • Claiming to be proficient in the 'C/C++ language' is a good way to persuade other developers that you have no more than a passing familiarity with at least one of the two. While the languages are legitimately similar, they exhibit very different styles, tend not to get used in the same areas, and have one heck of a Fandom Rivalry.
  • The editor of one early (late 1970s) British computer magazine persistently claimed that the difference between compilers and interpreters was "academic", even in the face of corrections from knowledgeable readers, until one month he learned the hard way just how wrong he was, by wasting three pages of the mag on a worthless hex-dump of the workspace of a BASIC interpreter. The mag didn't last very much longer after that issue.
  • Any real-life incident where a tech support person gets a call that starts out with "We bought the internet from you", "Is this the internet?", "I think I need to reboot the internet", "I deleted the internet" will lead to vicious mocking. Ditto referring to "the hard drive" when you meant the whole computer (as in "Should I take my hard drive for repairs?") Similarly if asked which browser they're using someone replies with the name of the ISP.
    • Or worse, the opposite. If the customer, when asked who their ISP is, responds with "Internet Explorer" you know it's going to be a very long day.
    • For a very long while, customers repeatedly referred to the computer "tower" (that is, the computer itself) as the "modem".
  • If you wish to communicate with people in the Free Software Foundation, or Debian users, make sure to call the use of the Linux kernel with the GNU userland tools: GNU/Linux. Most people don't care, but there are a few that are very serious about it.
    • Be very careful about who you talk to. Most other distros' users will get a bit irritated with you if you call the overall operating system GNU/Linux. Some Debian users do too. For further clarification this goes back to a very old argument between Linus Torvalds and Richard Stallman over who should get credit for free operating systems.
    • For some people this is enough of an annoyance that there have been serious proposals to actually excise the GNU userland tools from some mainstream distros, notably Gentoo. In practice doing this would be a lot of work just to introduce a bunch of compatibility problems, but at least people would shut up about it.
  • Call Microcomputers such as the Commodore 64, ZX Spectrum and the Amiga "PCs" in front of Microcomputer fans.
  • It's the Xbox. It's just one word, normally capitalized. Not XBox, XBOX, X-box, X-Box, or xBox. The name comes from Direct X; When Microsoft was creating it, it was codenamed the Direct X Box, or DirectXbox, and when they were trying to come up with a cool name for it, someone realized "Why don't we just use it as it is?"
  • Google's smartphone OS is called Android, not Droid. (Droid is a hardware branding for Android-based devices from Verizon Wireless)
  • The basis of the GUI on Unix and similar operating systems (with the exception of Mac OS X, which can use it but primarily uses Quartz) is the X Window System, X, or X11 (after what has been the current major version for some time; the Mac implementation is known as X11.app, for example), not X Windows.
  • The argument between binary-based definitions of "kilobyte", "megabyte" and "gigabyte" (etc.) and those arguing for decimal-based versions. Computers use binary (base-2), so powers of 2 (e.g. 1024 = 2^10) are a more natural fit than powers of 10 (e.g. 1000 = 10^3). As a result, the definition of a 1024 (not 1000) byte "kilo"-byte and a 1024*1024 (not 1000*1000) byte "mega"-byte became commonly-accepted (if not entirely universal). However, some argue that such use of the prefixes is nonstandard, and in 1996 the SI standardised on 1000-based definitions, using the alternate "kibibyte", "mebibyte", "gibibyte", etc. for the 1024-based versions. Others have argued that this went against existing convention, and the argument goes on...
  • Find a new thread with no replies on a forum, any forum, and reply "First." Regardless of that thread's original topic, it will decay into a thread dedicated to insulting you and reminding you it isn't 4Chan.
    • This will even get you flamed to oblivion on 4Chan, who equate it to a "bump"note 
  • Similar to the above example, slapping "Le" in front of a meme on any website that isn't Reddit and you will drive the other users into a frenzy of insults, rage, and mockery.
    • Now on Reddit, the users will descend into the same when you use "Le".

    Fashion 
  • The goth, punk, and emo subcultures tend to be very particular about what is and isn't goth, punk, or emo. All of them look disdainfully on middle-school goth kids that they refer to as "vampires". Bonus points for referring to modern "emo" music and fashion among emo fans from The Eighties.
  • Do not suggest that Lolita fashion has any sexual connotations.

    Films — Animated 
  • Just go on any board where anyone is talking about Coraline and refer to it as a Tim Burton movie... But arguably not their fault, considering that all of the advertising proclaimed "From Henry Selick, the director of The Nightmare Before Christmas, which many people also think Burton directed, but he actually only produced and worked on the story for.
  • Mistaking a CGI Disney film like Wreck-It Ralph or Bolt for a Disney-Pixar film is not wise around cartoon fans.
    • In particular, Planes is a spinoff created by Disney Toon Studios (mostly known for their direct-to-video sequels, prequels and midquels) and is not a Pixar movie - but it doesn't stop many people from mistakenly blaming Pixar for it.
  • Anastasia is not a Disney movie.
    • Though there is a Disney character named Anastasia.
  • Call a Don Bluth movie a Disney movie when there are Don Bluth fans around. You'll be sure to irk someone. Granted, Bluth did work at Disney for a time in the '70s (and he also worked on the Disney short The Small One).
  • Calling all animated films as only for little kids is sure to spark some kind of backlash, as plenty of animated films are rather mature. Calling The Lion King a little kid's film that nobody should cry at is a surefire way to elicit a reaction along the lines of "Have you even seen the film?".
  • Don't call Elsa from Frozen "Princess Elsa". Aside from the beginning of the film where she is a princess (though never referred to as such), she is referred to as Queen Elsa, and making the mistake of calling her "Princess" will cause backlash.
    • Speaking of Elsa, don't call her a villain either. Yes, she was originally written as one and maybe some of her actions are questionable, even if they're accidents, but the fandom will not take kindly to Elsa being called a villain.

    Films — Live-Action 
  • The weapons used by Jedi and Sith in the Star Wars movies are called lightsabers, not laser swords or laser blades.
    • On that note, do not call Darth Vader "Dark" Vader unless you want to earn the ire of fans.
  • James Cameron's Avatar:
    • An "avatar" is a transgenic half-breed telepathically controlled by a human. Go to any collective forum for this movie and call any one person in the film Avatar, or call the Na'vi "Avatars", or ask what this has to do with Avatar: The Last Airbender , and chances are you'll get a front row seat to a Flame War. The same goes for referring to the Na'vi (meaning The People) as 'Na'vis' (technically, 'the Na'vi' is Department of Redundancy Department if you go by a literal translation, but ignored for practicality since it also refers to them in a species context). Other mangling of names cause annoyance, such as 'Navi', 'Ney'tiri'/'Neyti'ri' or other omissions or addition of apostrophes. Calling ikran/toruk 'dragons' will cause a lot of annoyance, especially since if you don't want to use the actual name, there are even convenient English versions, and can be considered particularly egregious due to the obvious fact that they are not.
      • Presumably they also wouldn't like it if you pointed out that an avatar is a virtual representation (in this context, not the Hindu one). A corporeal representation... is called a waldo, after an early example in a Robert A. Heinlein story. That wouldn't look nearly as cool on the poster over the Na'vi eyes, though.
    • Examples other than words include the depressingly common complete misunderstanding of what tsaheylu is (likely perpetuated by a certain flash animation). Other misconceptions include some people who claim that either the floating mountains can't exist, claim that Pandora's magnetic field would kill a human, or that there is no oxygen on Pandora.
  • Mission: Impossible fans are completely divided from each other, and if you ever bring up the subject of Jim Phelps, you will never hear the end of it.
  • Godzilla fans are funny. Though they aren't likely to flame you for the names you use, the use of Japanese names is sort of a status symbol. So a "real" fan calls Godzilla "Gojira" or "Goji" for short. This gets silly when the name in question was actually in English, but the fans insist on spelling it the way it's pronounced in Japan (Spacegodzilla vs. Supeisugojira, or the Super X vs. the Supaa X [or Supaa Ekusu).
    • Refer to Mecha-Godzilla as "Kiryu" in front of American fans. It will cause a huge debate about which one is which (There were several Mecha-Godzillas, and only one of them was nicknamed Kiryu), which will only be made worse by fans who despise the name Kiryu and prefer Mecha-Godzilla.
      • Even worse is when you refer to Mechagodzilla in general as a "cyborg". Only two of the four Mechagodzilla versions have been cyborgs, those being MG'75 and Kiryu, and even then only Kiryu is a true cyborg (that being a machine with organic components, like Kiryu is, whilst MG'75 is a robot with it's control systems implanted into a organic body). Likewise, calling the Heisei-era Mechagodzilla "Super-Mechagodzilla" is another way to get corrected ("Super-Mechagodzilla", for clarification, is only used to reffer to the combined form of Heisei Mechagodzilla and Garuda, and not applicable to just MG alone). Reffering to a particular Mechagodzilla incorrectly (eg: "Mechagodzilla 2" instead of "Heisei Mechagodzilla", or "Mechagodzilla 3" instead of "Kiryu") is also a good way to get the fans on you.
    • Even among the more tolerant fans who allow American pronunciations, that mutant iguana from '98 is Zilla, now that the Japanese movies have used him. Before that, he was G.I.N.O.
      • Saying that Godzilla (2014) is a remake of the 1998 film doesn't sit well with Godzilla fans. Same thing goes for when journalists or critics say that the '98 film was "the last Godzilla film" until this one, out of apparent ignorance of Godzilla Final Wars and the rest of the Millennium series.
      • Calling the Shodai-Jira (that being the Zilla from G'98) by the name "Ameri-Goji", "American Godzilla" or, if you really want to piss them off, just "Godzilla" is sure to net you a fair amount of correction. Especially now, since the names "Ameri-Goji" and "American Godzilla" are being applied to the Legendary Pictures version, and not Zilla. And calling Shodai-Jira by the name "Godzilla" will net you quite a bit of reminders of the legally official name change that happened in the early 2000's, when Tri-Star lost the rights to Godzilla. However, calling him "Godzilla-USA" is not considered drastically wrong, since that washis name in Godzilla: Generations, a Toho-produced Dreamcast game that was released the same year the "remake" was.
    • What makes this all particularly odd is that "Gojira", with correct Japanese pronunciation, sounds more like "God-zill-a" than "Go-jeer-a".
  • Smith, the main villain in the second and third Matrix films, is an Agent only in the first movie, and his entire existence in the second and third revolves entirely around the fact that he is not an Agent anymore. Some in the Matrix community will unplug you if you call him an Agent in the context of the latter two films.
  • To the fanbase of the Underworld series of movies, particularly every single person who knows anything about mythology, it is Lycanthrope. The term "Lycan" is a clear shortening of the scientific name for the disease/curse (or rather the real world symptoms that mimic it), designed to be a slang insult to the species (at least until the prequel, at which point they tossed out their own sense).
  • Granted, fans of The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen tend to be a bit more tolerant than most, because they know that it's not exactly faithful to the source material (which isn't faithful to its own source material, either, so we can be forgiving). However, there are some no-nos even here, chiefly in character name spelling. It's Dorian Gray, not Darien Grey or any other permutation. It's Jekyll, not Jekall or Jekil or (heaven forbid) Jekkie.
  • Referring to Toccata and Fugue in D Minor as "Dracula's Theme" around either music fans or horror franchise fans will make you seem like a moron. It hasn't even been used in a Dracula movie. Although it has been used in some cuts of the 1925 Phantom of the Opera and in The Abominable Dr. Phibes.
  • Using the suffix -ception to imply a thing inside a thing inside a thing is certain to get you a scolding if you go into the bad parts of the Inception fandom. Or pretty much anywhere- that meme's been tired for a while now.
    • In the film, Inception is used for the idea of planting a thought in someones head, not the dream inside a dream inside a dream.
  • Tim Burton has created a giant case of Broken Base with Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. Just mention that movie to fans of Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory and watch the fireworks. Even among those who like both movies, don't even try to say that Johnny Depp made a better Willy Wonka (especially if you're talking to the first film's star Gene Wilder, who does not care for the Depp version). The other side of the spectrum is generally a bit calmer and more reasonable, but the Burton movie is not a remake and most certainly NOT a ripoff - and don't you dare call it that. The scriptwriter hasn't even seen the old movie, it's a completely new adaptation of the original book (although, bafflingly, with a few of the same departures from the book). And if you aren't aware that there was a book you will be laughed at by both sections of the fandom. Then there are the literary purists that claim the book is the only true way to experience the story. All in all, this is one heck of a mess.
  • Go up to a fan of The Wild Wild West and tell him/her you thought The Movie was fantastic. But make sure to put your affairs in order first.
  • If there's one way to annoy any Back to the Future fan, it's getting the date that Marty and Doc travelled to in the future in Part II wrong, which is October 21st, 2015. This isn't fans being petty, rather the result of an Urban Legend of Zelda that has gotten ridiculously out-of-hand. Once real-life history got into the decade of the 2010s, pretty much every year there has been a picture claiming that that particular day is the day they went to in the future (with the date being photoshopped to the current date). This has been taken Up to Eleven with Tumblr pages such as these, which are dedicated to photoshopping the date every single day. And people STILL fall for it.

    History 
  • Simplifying basically any event in history for whatever means will usually get you flamed by history enthusiasts, especially those in the know. Expect the flames to be white-hot if you have an agenda behind giving half-informed history info as "fact."
  • Confusing any of the major Central-and-South American empires with one another will probably result in a history aficionado doing their best impression of the infamous "tearing the still-beating heart from the chest" blood ritual on you.
  • When talking about Scottish history to a learned person, do not bring up Braveheart in any context other than a negative one. Then everyone can have a nice eye-rolling session and move on with the discussion.
  • Don't deny the Holocaust happened. Just don't do it. People will hate you, and they'll be right to hate you.
  • Also, do not claim World War Two was won by your country only and the other Allies were just a sideshow, no matter what country you live in. This berserk button keeps being pushed by Americans and Russians alike, but Russians and other post-Soviets have it worse: The USSR was first allied with the Third Reich since 1939, conquered half of Central Europe, before being forced to switch sides in 1941, and fighting against the Reich for the remainder of the war. It should be emphasized that the Eastern Front became the largest meat grinder in history of war.

    Literature 
  • In one series of Harry Turtledove books (known, alternatively, as TL-191 or the Southern Victory series), a Confederacy that survives into the 20th century is taken over by the dictator Jake Featherston, who is a Hitler analog. For some reason, people insist on misspelling it as "Featherstone". This really pisses off fans, but what really got people mad was when the misspelling appeared on the freakin' dustjacket of one of the books.
  • Referring to any of the books of the Inheritance Cycle as a "brick" can actually get you in trouble with the staff in some quarters. But in other places, even on fansites, the staff call them "bricks" too, but used as a term of affection rather than, well, ridicule and scorn.
    • Because of this, haters of the series refer to them as 'bricks' wherever possible.
  • Older Than Radio: In Mary Shelley's Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus, Victor Frankenstein constructs and brings to life his Creature or, if you prefer, Monster. The Creature itself is never named. Thanks to many films, comics and stage plays running the whole gamut of quality, people have been using the term "Frankenstein" to refer to his Creature (and being criticized for it) since the 19th century.
    • To the point that using "Frankenstein" without clarifying immediately makes people think that you're erroneously referring to the monster! For example, Monster High got called out on this when it first came out and still does, even though Frankie is the child of Doctor Frankenstein.
  • Some fans of that lady who wrote the Pern books are rather grumpy about "McCaffery", probably because her last name is "McCaffrey".
  • Similarly, some fans of J. R. R. Tolkien are grumpy about spelling his surname "Tolkein" or pronouncing it "Tol-kin" rather than "Tol-Keen". And even spelling "Middle-earth" as "Middle-Earth" in extreme cases.
    • Referring to The Lord of the Rings as a trilogy.
    • Whenever someone mispronounces Smaug's name, usually gets this reaction. The correct way is "sm-ow-g", not "smog".
  • Many of the fans of the Warrior Cats series will scream (or at least groan) should you make the mistake of not capitalizing the word "Clan". There are four Clans (five if you count SkyClan). The main characters are in ThunderClan. Their ancestors are StarClan. And don't you dare suggest otherwise. Perhaps justified in that this is pounded into your brain for over twenty books, and not bothering with grammar rules automatically gets you labeled as an idiot on the major forum.
    • Not to mention capitalizing the second part of a cat's name, it's Firestar, not Fire"Star"
    • Tread carefully aroumd Hollyleaf and Ashfur.
  • In the world of Lewis Carroll's Hunting of the Snark, if your snark happens to be a boojum, "you will softly and suddenly vanish away, and never be met with again." Not "softly and silently". This did cause arguments way back then, with one fan, Snarkophilius Snobbs, becoming infamous for persisting with this misquote.
    • In the presence of hardcore Carrollians, never refer to the Hatter as the Mad Hatter, or to the Jabberwock as the Jabberwocky.
    • Even more than the above, though, for the love of life don't claim Carroll was a pedophile, repressed or otherwise. Or on drugs. Given the nature of most Carrollians, though, you're less likely to get flamed and more likely to be firmly sat down for a Wall of Text essay on how whichever myth you claimed as truth came to be, and a healthy helping of evidence debunking it.
    • The above also applies to J.M. Barrie, who has been on the record as Not A Pedophile since around the time of his death.
  • Harry Potter fandom is large and diverse enough that almost anything is acceptable in some circles, but in general the following rules hold:
    • Electric technology at Hogwarts isn't permissible in any dose. Things that work electronically, as below, do not work. Things that work mechanically, such as Harry's watch, do work.
    • Hermione's name is Hermione. Unless you're Grawp or Viktor. There are absolutely no other exceptions. "Hermy" is an elf from Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer.
  • The eponymous entity in the Cthulhu Mythos has a name that will never have an agreed pronunciation (especially since Lovecraft himself used no fewer than three different pronunciations depending on when you asked him, and even then he insisted that these were merely about as close as a human mouth could get to the real pronunciation), and each pronunciation has a following that will ridicule and shun those who pronounce it differently.
    • Even worse are the discussions in fandom what the Elder Sign looks like - a star or a tree. Problem is that in different stories it is described as either. Mocked in the musical A Shoggoth On The Roof where in the opening a fight breaks out over this question. 'Star!' - 'Tree!' - 'Star!' - 'Tree!'...
  • P. G. Wodehouse's Jeeves is a valet, not a butler. Not that you can exactly be blamed for making the mistake, since it even occurs on book jackets.
  • Ahem, sparkly vampires in Twilight.
    • Unless you're on a fan site (or at least somewhere that has fans to back you up) it's probably for the best that you don't mention being a fan of the series due to its very vocal Hatedom and fan haters. Even if you're not an obsessive fangirl/fanboy, a good chunk of haters will view you as one.
    • Insulting the franchise, whether or not it's opinion-based, is Nutty Madam's berserk button. She will flip if anything critical is said against it and will fire back any insults she can. Calling out Stephen King is what made her infamous on YouTube.
  • While not likely to get you flamed, referring to George R. R. Martin's A Song of Ice and Fire series as "Game of Thrones" (the title of the HBO show based on the series which takes its name from the first book) is a good indicator of what kind of fan you are.
    • Also, don't refer to Asha as Yara unless you want to be laughed at.
    • Jon as John. Robb as Rob. Grey Wind as Greywind. Shaggydog as Shaggy Dog. Dany as Danny or Dani. Daenerys as Danaerys.
      • Calling Daenerys "Khaleesi" like it's her name rather than her title.
  • Don Rumata from Hard to Be a God is not a Progressor, and don't refer to him as a Progressor in the presence of Strugatsky Brothers fan.
  • In general: Whenever a popular book gets a movie based off it. Saying the movie is better than the book will often anger fans of the original book.
  • In the Star Wars Expanded Universe, even mentioning Mandalorians as having a philosophical point is a good way of inducing vitriolic backlash (or terrible debates) in some circles. Also, saying anything negative about Timothy Zahn is considered absolute Fandom Heresy, and will get you blacklisted faster than you can say "Mara Jade".
  • Any fan of The Hunger Games will not take kindly to comparisons with Battle Royale. Likewise, don't make the mistake of referring to Catching Fire and Mockingjay as Hunger Games 2 and Hunger Games 3, or calling Peeta Mellark Peter! And for the sake of whatever you hold holy, DON'T. COMPARE. IT. TO. TWILIGHT.

    Live-Action TV 
  • Doctor Who:
    • Referring to everyone's favorite Time Lord as "Doctor Who", or his show as Dr. Who, is not going to ingratiate you with the fanbase. The origin of all the confusion, as noted on the main Doctor Who page, is that the name for the character during the show's development was originally "Dr. Who", a name that was retained in the credits and internal documentation for over 20 years, despite the fact that the character was never called that on-screen except in Mythology Gagsnote  and once by accident — a scriptwriter had had a computer ask in dialogue "Where is Doctor Who?" and it was not corrected (Rather like the Trope Namer, in that sense). He was Dr. Who in the two movies released in The Sixties, but those were clearly an Alternate Continuity.
    • On that note, the Doctor's REAL NAME is not "The Doctor"; "The Doctor" is a "title" or a name that he chose for himself, with the presumed reason by fans being that his real name is too complicated for any other species but Time Lords to pronounce. Fans of the show will be very quick to point this out to you if you ask a question such as "why did his parents name him after a medical profession?".
      "I'm the Doctor. Well, they call me the Doctor - I don't know why. I call me the Doctor, too. Still don't know why."
    • Using "Timelord" instead of "Time Lord" or any spelling other than TARDIS is a bad idea.
    • It's also probably a good idea to avoid referring to the actor that played the Fifth Doctor as "Peter Davidson," unless you enjoy the thought of being lectured on how Peter Davison is an actor, while Peter Davidson is the guy who used to draw Desperate Dan in The Dandy.

      Doctor Who Magazine's Fifth Doctor announcement managed to mess this up , reading "PETER DAVIDSON IS THE DOCTOR" (they lampshaded this later when Davison got a cover for "Time Crash").
    • Referring to NuWho Doctors' regenerations as any of the first four (as in Eccleston, Tennant, Smith, and Capaldi as, respectively, the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th, as opposed to the correct 9th, 10th, 11th, and 12th). Really, any show of ignorance towards the show's past in light of the NuWho series, but this is probably the most stated example.
  • Jim intentionally did this to irritate Dwight on The Office. After an ethics meeting where they were told to avoid "Time Theft" in the workplace, Jim had a deliberately loud conversation with Andy about the Battlestar Galactica TV show. During that conversation, he talked about how the show has Klingons and Wookiees, is a shot-for-shot remake of the original, and is about a character named Dumbledore Calrissian who has to return a ring to Mordor. Meanwhile, Dwight is seething at his desk, trying his hardest to refrain from getting involved in this non-work-related conversation.
  • It's quite easy to hit the Fandom Berserk Button from The Colbert Report fandom (the fact that politics is frequently involved probably doesn't help), but the quickest way to do it is to spell Stephen Colbert's name wrong. There is no such person as "Steven Colbert". Pronouncing the T in "Colbert" will cause similar levels of rage.
  • Confusing Star Wars with Star Trek in the presence of either fandom is one of the most brutal suicide methods known to man. A troll jokingly asked in a YouTube comment if TNG was "the one with the ewoks". Insta-Flame War.
    • A joke about it was made in The Big Bang Theory, when Amy confusing Star Trek with Star Wars, and Penny stating that they (Sheldon, Leonard, Howard and Raj) will get mad at her if they confuse both series, but in her opinion they are basically the same thing.
    • Comedian and fellow nerd, Brian Posehn, discussed this in his stand-up, stating that the quickest way to piss off a nerd is to get their obsession wrong. He then gave an example by mentioning how he would drive out in front of people lined up to see the Star Wars prequels and shout, "STAR TREK SUCKS!"
    • Mentioning that Star Trek is a rip-off of Star Wars.
  • For a long time, you could easily get a Star Trek fan angry at you by referring to him or her as a "Trekkie". Today, the term has more-or-less been reclaimed by the fandom, in much the same way that "queer" was reclaimed by the gay community.
  • On The Price Is Right, "Showcase Showdown" is when they spin the Big Wheel; "Showcase" is when they bid on the prize packages. Many people have been chewed out for referring to the two segments as "The (Big) Wheel" and "Showcase Showdown", respectively, as it supposedly makes more sense that way. However, the fact is that the "Showcase Showdown" was not part of the show until it became one hour long. Originally, they played three pricing games and the top two winners would compete in "The Showcase". When the show became an hour, another three pricing games were played in the second half, and the end of each half had a "Showcase Showdown" to see which two players would go to "The Showcase", and it has been that way ever since.
  • A lot of Super Sentai purists get pissy if you use Power Rangers-specific terminology in the context of Sentai (e.g. "Zords" instead of "mecha") or if you refer to a Super Sentai character by the name of their Power Rangers counterpart (e.g. Rita Repulsa instead of Bandora the Witch). Some fans even go as far as to insist on using the term senshi (the Japanese word for warrior) instead of "ranger" when talking about the members of a Sentai (since the term "ranger" wasn't used for most of the teams prior to Kyoryu Sentai Zyuranger, with the exceptions of Himitsu Sentai Goranger and Kousoku Sentai Turboranger). Although, the introduction of the "Ranger Keys" in Kaizoku Sentai Gokaiger has made the term "Ranger" a bit more acceptable as a substitute for senshi among purists. The following series Tokumei Sentai Go Busters has introduced Megazord into the Sentai lexicon as well as the phrase "It's Morphin Time".
    • Speaking of Power Rangers, Jason David Frank (actor for Tommy, the original Sixth Ranger and Ensemble Darkhorse) was once booed for saying that he would have preferred it if Steve Cardenas (Rocky the second Red Ranger) had returned for the "Forever Red" Reunion Show instead of Austin St. John (Jason the first Red Ranger).
    • The Red Rangers from Kyoryu Sentai Zyuranger and Gosei Sentai Dairanger are named Tyranno Ranger and Ryu Ranger, not ZyuRed nor DaiRed like most Sentai heroes are. Also, the Sixth Ranger from Chouriki Sentai Ohranger is called King Ranger, not OhGold (and this is actually a double faux pas, as he's considered to be the team's black ranger by his Ranger Key, not gold at all, unlike his counterpart from Power Rangers Zeo).
    • Best way to piss of a Power Rangers fan? Ask them you didn't know that Mighty Morphin Power Rangers was still on. It's not. It's just Power Rangers now.
      • Or point out Zack and Trini's Ranger colors matching their ethnicity. note  And then there's the Austin St. John porn rumors... definitely not true in case you were wondering.
    • Calling Power Rangers a Voltron Ripoff illicits fans to question whether this person actually knows the origins of both shows which originate from the same Company Toei at about the same time, Though Super Sentai beats in by several years The multi piece transforming mecha concept was added to the show in the early until 1981's Sun Vulcan the same Year that Go-lion aired with The former actually beating the latter to air. Though Super sentai wouldn't have a five piece gattai until 1987's Maskman.
      • Strange enough theres been at least one case of the Reboot Volton Force being accused of ripping off Power Rangers by an uninformed fan.
  • Calling any version of Stargate "StarGate" or "Star Gate" will cause every fan of the series in the world to tell you just how wrong you are, and how it's nothing like Star Trek or Star Wars.
  • Confusing the British original and American remake versions of Skins is likely to get this reaction from fans of the former - who make up the majority of the fandom, and most of whom see the American version as somewhere between forgettable and an unwatchable atrocity.
  • In the early days of the Glee fandom, spelling Quinn's name as "Quin", "Gwen", or "Gwynn" was a good way to expose yourself as a noob. Nowadays, the relentless exposure the show gets makes it kind of hard to misspell any major character's name if you're following it with any regularity.
  • The Soup is the current incarnation of an older show that was named Talk Soup. When TV personalities refer to it by the old name (which happens a lot), you can be sure Joel won't let it pass without comment.
  • It's Downton Abbey, not Downtown Abbey. Only one "w". Noted by xkcd.
  • Family Feud is misspelled as "Family Fued" so often that the fanbase is driven up the wall every time somebody spells it that way.
  • The easiest way to start a Flame War in the Pretty Little Liars fandom is to mention that in the books Alison had a twin and say that she must have one in the show.
  • Try mentioning that you like a Season 4 episode on a Community message board, or, God forbid, say the show was better off without Dan Harmon. You will get torn to bits, with maybe one fan trying to defend you.
    • However, no one will defend you if you like The Big Bang Theory, especially if you watch it live while DVRing (Communitynote .
  • Don't say you started watching Supernatural with the fourth season, to "get to Cas faster." Even Dean/Cas fans will give you the hairy eyeball, and Wincesters are liable to skin you.
  • Babylon 5 has ABSOLUTELY nothing to do with either Star Wars or Star Trek. Claiming otherwise in the presence of any of these three will result in you being fed to the Saarlac, "The Vorlon" or some random Negative Space Wedgie. Possibly all three.

    Music 
  • One Berserk Button across all fandoms, regardless of the genre of music, is claiming to be a big fan of a musician while only citing their singles as the reason why you are. And God help you actually admit to becoming a fan after hearing a song featured in a show or movie you watched.
  • Marilyn Manson is a band, and the lead singer's stage name (not even his parents still call him Brian Hugh Warner, and he does not answer to it, so you don't get to call him that). They are not "devil worshipers", they are not evil demons sent from hell to corrupt your kids, Marilyn Manson (the man) did not have any ribs removed, was not on The Wonder Years, is not dead and does not ever kill animals on stage. The one time someone suggested he hurt a cat in an interview, he shot them down and told them that he likes cats, and in fact he has a pet cat (formerly two, but his ex-wife took one in the divorce) named Lily White. Oh, and all of the band is male. Even if Twiggy Ramirez doesn't always look it. Although, the fandom generally doesn't mind if you think that Twiggy and Manson are together, because a fair portion of them agree. Also, their second LP is Antichrist Superstar. Not "Anti-Christ Superstar" or "Anti Christ Superstar" or "Anti Christ Super Star". Also, liking more than one era of Manson is apparently a crime.

    Blaming either the man or the band for Columbine is a surefire way to be flamed to oblivion. The Columbine killers hated his music.
  • That famous Lynyrd Skynyrd song with the long guitar solo? It's called "Free Bird," not Freebird. Diehard Skynyrd fans WILL correct you.
  • Luca Turilli's first album is King of the Nordic Twilight. The tenth track on said album is "Kings of the Nordic Twilight". Remember this if you do not wish to be set on fire.
  • Quiet Riot's song "Metal Health (Bang Your Head)", or "Bang Your Head (Metal Health)". Calling it just "Bang Your Head" is Tempting Fate.
  • Metalcore (or any word with "-core" in it except maybe grindcore) is not considered metal. It's best not to call metalcore metal on a metal forum. On second thought, just don't mention metalcore at all unless it sounds like Starkweather or Integrity; bringing up melodic metalcore is just a no-go period.
    • Claiming that Cradle Of Filth is Black Metal may get you this depending on the community.
      • Try to avoid talking about Nymphetamine around serious Cradle of Filth fans. It's commonly agreed that those who say Nymphetamine (hell, anything after Damnation and a Day, really) is their best work are looked at as casual fans, or new to the band. Most old school fans agree that It's Popular, Now It Sucks.
  • Do NOT pronounce Yoshiki Hayashi's name as "Yosheekee." Even if the mainstream media almost always does this unless the reporter is Japanese, and even if he tends to ignore it. The best pronounciation for most native English speakers is "Yosh'ki" or "Yoshkey." Neither are perfect Japanese pronounciation, but both are far closer to correct than "Yosheekee."
  • Groundlessly bashing hide or Munetaka Higuchi or Jasmine You or anyone else who is dead on any jrock community in general is often seen as trolling or shit-stirring behavior, because the jrock/Visual community has a very strong strain of Never Speak Ill of the Dead. You might get away with trashing poor Soichiro Umemura, but most likely doing so will bring out the one Tokyo Yankees fan still around to start the Flame War.

    Neither hide's nor Jasmine's deaths have an exact official cause. hide's may have been an accident, or it may have been suicide — he can't tell us so we'll never know. Jasmine definitely died of an illness, but the exact illness was never specified, and he may have also committed suicide as a result of the illness. So, it's common for people to speculate, and sensible guesses are often sort of tolerated. Unfortunately, some people come out with really, genuinely silly, often downright offensive Epileptic Trees such as "hide killed himself just to piss off Yoshiki" or "Hizaki killed Jasmine You". These are the people who will end up in trouble, and it serves them right, really. In a similar vein, the official cause of Taiji Sawada's death is highly disputed despite being "official" - by, among others, his fiancee, his mother, and other artists who knew him - and defending Kitami Terumi or the actions of the law enforcement in Saipan, or even suggesting that he deserved it, can be seen as very offensive to the degree of being trollish.
  • Dir En Grey sets the standards for Crazy Awesome and Neoclassical Punk Zydeco Rockabilly in the Japanese metal scene. Comparing them to bands such as The Gazette, Deathgaze, Lynch and Girugamesh simply because of visual and musical similarities would greatly enrage the fandom.
    • Even worse: arguing about what the band's musical style is. The band officially recognizes itself as "uncategorized". Don't be stupid enough to put them in genres such as Nu Metal, Progressive Metal or Deathcore without carefully analyzing every song in their discography. Otherwise, get ready to become the target of legions of outraged fans who are willing to defend their opinions to death; they will even go as far as stalking and attacking their targets during live shows.
    • This applies to ANYTHING related to Dir En Grey. Even criticizing their music or simply stating you didn't like one of their shows can lead to major drama.
  • X Japan has quite a few, although due to the fandom's insanely Broken Base, they are rarely universal.
    • An early universal one was saying COLOR was a better band. This one actually caused people to get hurt in Real Life Bar Brawl incidents - especially if said to one of the band members themselves. It's pretty much chilled out now, but it was the biggest fandom berserk button.
    • As of The New Tens, saying Dir en grey is THE Japanese metal band and X Japan sucks won't necessarily lead to a full-on brawl or a Flame War (due to the Broken Base of X Japan fandom that thinks it sucks, itself) but will likely draw a few flames, especially if worded in a way that shows you have no idea who once produced Dir en grey.
    • One of the almost universal ones is insulting or harshly criticizing hide or Taiji, especially in regard to their actual musical skill. Never Speak Ill of the Dead definitely applies, and as both were capable enough musicians compared to anyone else in Heavy Metal (and better than some others), insulting their musical skill is trolling.
    • Expressing support for Masaya/Home of Heart/Toshi's ex-wife is another almost-universal one, with how obvious the damage to him was and the reaction they had to being called on it.
    • One of the biggest is the Broken Base between the people who recognize and celebrate the Ho Yay and the side that insists it does not exist, everyone is 100 percent heterosexual, the fanservice was somehow not intended to be Ho Yay, etcetera. While most of the active flamewar between both sides has died down (mostly because the tactic of many of the more fervent of the "everyone is straight" side of posting outright anti-gay hate has fallen well out of favor in the Western fandom), if you put a yaoi/bara fan in the same thread as a Heteronormative Crusader and both are fans of the band, there will be Flame War.
    • The next biggest is the Broken Base over Yoshiki himself - some fans of the band hate him to an almost scary degree, others love him perhaps a little too much, and therefore everything he does or does not do is a berserk button to some fans while pleasing the others.
    • Which album do you like the best? DO NOT say Dahlia is your favorite, even if it is. Saying The Last Live is your favorite live is almost as likely to upset someone/start a flamefest.
    • Taiji vs. Heath, who's the best bassist? The more diplomatic should say they like both. While siding with one will get you their side of the Broken Base, it's the fandom berserk button for the other side.
    • Almost everything in some way or another - it's got a Broken Base rivaling Metallica's.
  • Calling all electronic music "techno" will earn you death in some circles. It's only swift if you're lucky.
    • Likewise, dubstep is now the new "techno", becoming more mis-associated with any electronic music that uses harsh leads and drops. The genre itself also an example of a Broken Base by classifying music under this term. It originally described electronic music that contained elements of garage, 2-step, and dub, hence the name. Dubstep's association with huge drops and wobbly bass came later, when it somehow crossed over with the drum & bass scene. However, in practical terms, it can all be called dubstep in certain contexts. Just don't tell people at the Dubstep Forum (or other diehards of older styles), how Skrillex makes awesome dubstep.
  • Refer to Pink Floyd as "he" and prepare to be laughed at.
    • The Pink Floyd example was actually referenced in their song "Have A Cigar":
    Oh by the way, which one's Pink?
    • And later The Wall was sort of written about the life of a character named Pink.
      • Saying your favorite song is "Dark Side of the Moon" most likely make the fan you're talking to Face Palm. There is no actual song with that title. The penultimate song of the album, called Brain Damage, contains the line "I'll see you on the Dark Side of the Moon" and is often played together on the radio with the following song named Eclipse, leading some people to believe that it's one self-titled song. Or they might be talking about the singles from the album (Money, Time or Us And Them)
      • Similarly, there is no song called "The Wall", which is again the name of the album. The song in question is called "Another Brick in the Wall (part 2)", and shares its names with two other songs (parts 1 and 3, natch). It's also often played with "The Happiest Days of our Lives" attached to the beginning, and playing the former without the later can result in casual fans asking "Why did it start in the middle?"
      • All in all, most Pink Floyd fans are forgiving, if weary, of the large number of errors that seem to be fairly common.
  • You're unlikely to be slaughtered for it, but expect some groans, sighs and face-palms if you walk onto a forum/comments page/website/whatever for a Visual Kei band or song and ask something along the lines of "Are they all men?" or "Such-and-such is a woman, right?" Hardly anyone finds these questions bad in their own right, it's just that they get asked so many times that people get fed up with having to answer them.
  • If you are discussing sexual orientation in Visual Kei, do not make the mistake of claiming "they're all gay" or, inversely, "they are all straight." "They're all gay" will, depending on the tone, get you seen as a Kayfabe-deluded Yaoi Fangirl OR as a bigoted homophobic troll, with predictable results. "They're all straight" developed as a bit of "cool fan" backlash when it was discovered that some bands use onstage Ho Yay as fanservice only while being straight - but applying it to everyone, especially in a snarky tone erases the actual gay and bi men that populate the scene and will get you seen as a troll trying to start a fight at best and a bigot denying the existence of homosexuality at worst. The truth of the matter is, as always, somewhat more gray: Kayfabe Ho Yay for fanservice done by straight VK artists is a thing, but the scene, especially early on, was also a (somewhat) safe haven for gay and bisexual men and non-gender-conforming people, meaning yes, there are real GLBT people in Visual Kei, and even a slightly higher percentage of them than in the mainstream. It's especially true for some of the earliest artists since fake Ho Yay for fanservice didn't even catch on as a widespread bandwagon trend until the early to mid 90s.
  • Even though it's impossible for two people to agree on what emo is, if you call a band emo and it isn't, you're bound to catch hell for it.
  • There are many Queen fans who do not like Freddie Mercury's first name being spelled with a Y at the end.note  The reactions will range from a gentle "*Freddie, please" to flaming you from heaven to earth.
    • On that note, calling Freddie Mercury gay will undoubtedly lead to legions of fans correcting you that he was bisexual.
  • Talk to any Radiohead fan and mention "Tom York". Or, "Johnny Greenwood".
  • If you're discussing Mozart with any serious classical fan, don't make the mistake of mentioning how Salieri poisoned him. Amadeus plays quite fast and loose with historical fact; it was never intended to be a Mozart biopic so much as just the film of Shaffer's play. No reputable Mozart scholar out there thinks Salieri poisoned him or plotted against him, and in fact, the two men actually got along quite well (save for a brief dispute arising from an alleged attempt by Salieri to sabotage The Marriage of Figaro) and greatly respected each other. Salieri also had nothing to do with either the commission for or the completion of Mozart's Requiem. And by the way, Salieri wasn't the talentless hack portrayed in the movie. In fact, he taught Beethoven and Schubert and was one of the most successful composers of his time (even if his popularity died down after his death).
    • This is parodied in Complete World Knowledge, where we're told that Salieri killed Mozart by stabbing him a dagger dipped in rheumatic fever.
  • Fans of Muse have sometimes been critical of the name being written as "MUSE" just because the logo is all caps.
    • Want to really piss off fans of Muse? Just call them a Radiohead rip off.
  • A lot of die-hard music fans get very picky over genres, to the point of getting into lengthy flame wars over which of two very similar subgenres of metal a particular band fits into. Even worse is when you get a band that seems to fit perfectly into a certain genre, and the only thing stopping them from doing so is the fact that the bandleader insists otherwise. For a good example of this, look at the My Chemical Romance entry a few lines up, and think of the lives that have been lost because incredibly easy mistakes were made.
    • Always head into any Heavy Metal discussion with shields raised, targs forwards. Inevitably, you will hit this. May also occur with goth. Standard accusations are mostly that said bands are not (genre) enough to count as real (genre) bands. See also: 'Hair Metal' like Poison in comparison to the rest of metal, with all but the most generic metal fans proclaiming they are merely 'hard rock' to disassociate from them.
  • Melvins fans will get angry if you refer to them as a grunge band.
  • Don't call into a classic rock station and request "The Who's Teenage Wasteland". Not only will they not play it, but they may come to your house and work you over. The title is "Baba O'Riley."
  • The genre is called "country music" or "country"; it hasn't been "country western" since the 1960s. Using the "western" tag automatically identifies you as a non-fan, and is nothing short of a Berserk Button for fans of the genre.
    • The genre itself for anyone who isn't a fan. Country music carries with it a lot of baggage, mostly cultural and political.
    • There are fans of old-style Country (more directly based on old Folk style) who do not appreciate Rockabilly and Pop-fusion being lumped in with "Country".
  • Its Mötley Crüe, not Motley Crue. The dots are important. However, since most English (North America and the UK) computer keyboards don't have an umlaut feature and not too many people know the "alt + numberpad combo = special character" feature, it's somewhat forgivable.
    • Since they're ëxtränëöüs ümläüts that were basically chosen because the band liked the way they looked in "Löwenbräu", this comes across to non-fans as a bit precious.
  • Some people think "Down with the Sickness" by Disturbed is simply called "Sickness" (possibly with a "the" added). Disturbed fans aren't happy about it.
    • Also, the final track on the same album is "Meaning of Life" despite many who might claim it's called "Psycho".
    • Another track in that record is called "Voices", not "Are You Breathing?".
    • "Conflict", also from The Sickness, is sometimes referred to as "Enemy".
    • For that matter, do yourself a favor and don't try to classify what type of music they play; the closest anyone can agree on is "some kind of metal", with different albums ranging anywhere from Heavy Metal to Nu Metal to some kind of quasi-melodic metal rock hybrid. The closest you can get is going on an album-by-album basis; even the band themselves state they just play what they want and "let the record company figure out what section to put it in."
  • Eve of Destiny are Goth. Not Visual Kei. This point is nowhere near as trivial as it seems. Anyone who calls EoD visual runs a significant risk of being shot down and stamped on by an indignant fan/fans. It doesn't help that having EoD's genre mistaken in this manner has become something of a Berserk Button for frontman Haruhiko Ash, to the point where he has severed ties with promoters who sold Eve of Destiny as a Visual band.
  • Many fans of Canadian band The Tragically Hip can be quite hostile towards people who the drop "The" from the band's name — or don't capitalize it.
  • Led Zeppelin is a band — not a solo artist. Saying "Yes, I like him" will mark you as a poseur by hardcore fans.
    • Though casual fans might take a bit of ribbing if they say "Zo-so" instead of 'Page's Symbol.'
    • Led Zeppelin's fourth album does not have a title. Call it "the fourth album" or "the untitled album", and you should be fine. In some circles, calling it "Led Zeppelin IV" or "Four Symbols" will give you away as only a casual fan. Call it "the Hermit Album," "the one with 'Stairway to Heaven'" or "Zoso" and you will be held beneath contempt.
  • The Phantom of the Opera is a musical, not an opera. Opera buffs will slaughter you if you say Phantom is the last opera you saw.
    • Another good way to get devoured by opera buffs is to express admiration for any child "opera singer," like (preteen) Charlotte Church or Jackie Evancho. This is because, as most professional voice teachers will tell you, having kids sing repertoire intended for adult voices is actually quite harmful to their vocal development, for the same reason that you don't teach Little League pitchers to throw curveballs. While kids might be able to do it, it really strains their muscles, and doing it repeatedly will lead to permanent damage that warps the muscles' development. (There's a reason these kids tend to fall off the map when they reach their teens.)
    • And yet another opera fan Berserk Button is when every single singer who has a big voice with lots of vibrato is called an "opera singer," regardless of whether or not s/he actually sings opera. Josh Groban and Sarah Brightman are common examples.
  • Primus does, in fact, suck. Trying to argue against it will make fans of them laugh at you.
  • Naming John Williams as your favorite "modern music" composer is likely to get you dissed by most serious classical music fans on its own. Same with Danny Elfman, or Andrew Lloyd Webber, or any modern film/Broadway composer, but John Williams is a huge Berserk Button since so much of his music is directly-copied from, if not heavily influenced by, older works.
    • Likewise with confusing the "classical-crossover" genre (i.e., people who blend classical music with pop genres, like Vanessa Mae) with "contemporary classical music" (i.e. music by modern-day classical composers, like Steve Reich, Pierre Boulez, Philip Glass, etc).
  • If you refer to a well-known song, especially one involved in Memetic Mutation, by its catchiest lyric, there is a very good chance someone will swoop in and insist you refer to it by the "proper title", which is usually much less known and thus does a poorer job of conveying which song you're talking about.
  • Spelling Metallica as "Mettalica" won't get a nice reaction.
    • Or writing it as "MetallicA", just because the logo draws the bordering letters bigger.
  • Referring to any member of the Backstreet Boys except Kevin Richardson as a "former Backstreet Boy" is an instant Berserk Button trigger for BSB fans.
  • Never EVER wonder out loud how many bass drums Iron Maiden 's Nicko McBrain uses while drumming. The answer is one.
  • DragonForce's famed song from Guitar Hero is "Through The Fire And Flames". "Through The Fire And The Flames" is a lyric from said song. Also, ZP was ZP's actual first name, not initials.
  • On the Band Geek side: Gorramnit, people, trumpets are NOT the awesome ones with the slides!!
    • Likewise: calling every wind instrument a "horn," calling saxophones brass instruments (despite being made of brass, they're actually woodwinds), or confusing a Sousaphone with a tuba.
    • On a related note: Drum corps do not have woodwinds, so please don't call them "bands".
  • It's BEATLES, not "Beetles"!
    • If you don't know who wrote the song, you probably shouldn't guess. Saying something like "I love 'Here Comes the Sun'! It's my favorite song by Lennon"note  (or any other song with the incorrect songwriter) could earn you ridicule from a die-hard fan (to give an example, even Frank Sinatra never heard the end of it after he called George Harrison's "Something" his "favorite Lennon-McCartney song"). Likewise with who sings it; while their Liverpool accents might make them all sound the same to more casual fans, hardcore Beatlemaniacs usually have no trouble telling their voices apart.
    • Saying with a straight face that Yoko was the sole or main cause of the break-up of The Beatles. At the very least, it will expose you as a newbie or casual Beatles fan, someone who hasn't spent a lot of time diving into their history (where it's clear that, while John focusing more on his relationship with Yoko and bringing her into the studio certainly exacerbated things, the biggest culprits were money problems (particularly the disagreement over whether Lee Eastman or Allen Klein should handle their finances) and the ever-common "Creative Differences").
    • Whether you're talking to hardcore Beatles fans or people who are more broadly fans of classic rock, saying The Beatles are /2overrated" is practically heresy, and at least will get you a rant about how you young whippersnappers could never really have appreciated just what a big deal they were at the time, if you weren't there.
  • Do not ever call the group Gorillaz "Gorillas", or even worse, "The Gorillas".
  • Attempting to define Enter Shikari as anything at all will generally cause backlash from the fans as they are considered to be in no genre in particular, though naming particular genres present in particular songs is certainly acceptable. This can be disregarded if the term being used is non-serious or affection in nature (Entershikaricore)
  • Calling Richard Wagner a Nazi or his music "Nazi music". While Richard Wagner was a virulent anti-Semite and his music was beloved by and used as propaganda by the Nazis, Wagner himself died before Hitler was even born. There was no way he could ever have been a Nazi. (The Nazi stuff, and how much Wagner's anti-Semitism influenced his music tends to be Internet Backdraft territory among Wagnerian opera lovers anyway, so just don't go there unless you know what you're getting into.) Also, don't confuse valkyries with Vikings, whatever you do.
    • Friedrich Nietzsche, who had been an anti-Semite himself before he reformed and had been Wagner's friend, eventually renounced him as well.
    "Wagner contaminates everything he touches – he has made music sick."
    • The above notably does not apply to Israelis or Israel itself, where Wagner is still pretty much outright banned.
  • Similarly to the Wagner example, do not call Rammstein Nazis or fascists. Not only will you mark yourself as an idiot who can't even go and look up the lyrics if you don't speak German, but one who also is likely just racist towards Germans in general. Especially because they're rather left wing, which is quite different from Nazis, who would fall under the lowest quadrant of the political spectrum. Oh, and don't mispronounce the band's name, the fangirls and David Lynch will rip your limbs off.
  • Also related to the above, do NOT imply that 311 is affiliated with the Ku Klux Klan (K is the eleventh letter of the alphabet, 3 Ks, get it?). The band's normally laid-back fanbase will tear you a new one.
  • In general, claiming that "rap isn't music" on a music forum (of any kind, really) will brand you as one of two things: an out-of-the-loop Grumpy Old Man whining about "kids these days", or an angsty 13-year-old who thinks rock fans are oppressed because the popular kids made fun of his Led Zeppelin shirt. Either way, you'll come across as racist.
  • Similar to the above example, don't be surprised when someone bursts into a tirade that Hip Hop and Rap are completely and entirely different forms of music that have absolutely nothing to do with each other. The usual distinction? Hip-Hop is whatever that person happens to like, whereas Rap is whatever they don't like. In other words, Hip-Hop is the good stuff, while Rap is the bad stuff.
    • Could be the other way around for people who hate Hip-Hop.
  • The name of REM's 1986 studio album is Lifes Rich Pageant, with no apostrophe. The missing apostrophe came from one of Michael Stipe's notorious typing errors, and the band decided to run with it instead of correct it, thus making the "incorrect" version the official title.
  • When listening to Yuki Kajiura's music, asking what language it's being sung in will earn you a facepalm. It's her own made up language. And don't ask for a translation either, because the individual words don't actually mean anything. It's essentially just gibberish.
    • Even worse than asking is answering the question with "it's in English/Japanese/Latin/any combination thereof". Dozens of angry Kajiura fans will rush to correct you.
  • Vocaloid, like Touhou, has the classic "what anime is this from?" At this point, though, it's happened so many times (both intentionally and not) that it's usually just laughed off. A more dangerous error is to refer to the characters as "holograms." This will make fans assume you're too clueless to know that the concerts are only a tiny part of the fandom, and gullible enough to believe that the characters' concert appearances are actually holograms (they're just projections on a transparent screen, but at some point a news article wrongly called them "holograms" and the misconception stuck).
    • There's also The Last Revolver. Say it's Wrath, and...
      • This mistake's status as this trope became Hilarious in Hindsight when it turned out that the song actually was about the Wrath sinner. It's still not the Wrath song, but it is much closer to it than fans had initially thought.
  • Never refer to Louis Tomlinson as "Louie" or pronouce his name like "Lewis," or you will get torn apart by thousands of Directioners.
    • Zayn's catchphrase is not "What's Happening?", it's "Vas' Happenin'."
  • Suggest Herbie Hancock deserved to win the Oscar for Round Midnight over Ennio Morricone's The Mission and you may find your teeth relocated to your ass. Especially if you say it to a Morricone fan.
  • There is a section of film music fandom that considers Hans Zimmer to be the Antichrist, not least because of his various protégés and their tendency, for the most part, to sound like him (it doesn't help that many of his scores - and their scores - carry "Additional Music by" credits). And for all the praise heaped on Christopher Nolan's films about Batman, don't tell Danny Elfman fans (and even some non-fans) that Zimmer's scores > Elfman's if you ever want them to speak to you again.
  • Referring to metal as "screamo" will often get very angry responses, regardless of whether you were intentionally doing it to annoy them or whether you were saying it out of ignorance or stupidity.
    • Better yet, call a post-hardcore or metalcore band "screamo" in front of a fan of actual screamo. That skinny dude with the glasses in the City of Caterpillar shirt? Yeah, he's probably going to beat you to death.
  • John Stump's "Faerie's Aire/Death Waltz" has absolutely nothing to do with "U.N. Owen Was Her?", and attributing Death Waltz to ZUN does not go over well with Touhou fans in the know or John Stump fans. It's a commonly made mistake and the more people try to clear it up, the more people get confused from the mention of both of them in the same sentence.
  • When speaking to, or near, Kpop fans, it is inadvisable to imply that any member of any group is homosexual. While many fangirls would squeal, those who aren't into that kind of thing may go on a homicidal rampage. Saying that anyone from a boy group looks like a girl is also a death wish.
  • Jethro Tull is a band. Their lead singer and flautist is Ian Anderson. Get it straight.
    • Historical note: there was a man named Jethro Tull in Real Life- an 18th-century agricultural reformer, whom the band was named after.
  • Don't tell fans of The Protomen the band members' real names. It ruins the magic.
    • Also, don't say they're a cover band, or confuse them with The Megas.
  • The name of "Weird Al" Yankovic's parody of Avril Lavigne's song "Complicated" is called "A Complicated Song," NOT "Constipated."
  • Should you come across the real name of anyone in or formerly in The Birthday Massacre, keep it to yourself. The band have requested that anyone who knows their real name should not spread it around, and the fans tend to get extremely annoyed if anyone decides to just throw the names out for all and sundry.
  • Doctor Steel is not copying Dr. Horrible. He did the look first.
  • "Bob Dylan writes good lyrics, but he can't sing." Gee, Never Heard That One Before.

    Professional Wrestling 
  • Saying "Wrestling's all fake" like it makes you far more insightful. That cat has been out of the bag for a long time now and it isn't the point at all any more than suggesting you shouldn't watch TV shows or books that are in the fiction section.
    • Some fans will get seriously upset at the use of the word fake because it implies that (especially to the minds of impressionable children) that nothing you see is real, that people don't get legitimately injured, that the things wrestler do aren't potentially dangerous to those who don't know what they're doing, and that there isn't a tremendous amount of skill in what they do. They tend to prefer the terms "scripted", in that match results are known beforehand and "staged", in that both/all of the wrestlers in the ring are performers working together to put on an entertaining show, rather than competitors.
  • Claiming that wrestlers "just know how to fall" or otherwise don't get injured. Fans are aware of the concept of Selling and can probably tell you about a number of real injuries to occur.
  • For the love of Foley, if you don't watch wrestling, don't describe John Cena or Hulk Hogan as your favorite wrestlers.
    • Another good way to get a lot of wrestling fans to respond to you is make the audacious claim that John Cena is the best wrestler ever (surpassing such icons as Shawn Micheals, The Undertaker, Mick Foley/Cactus Jack/Mankind/Dude Love, The Rock or, God forbid, "Stone Cold" Steve Austin) or God help you if you ask about who that Owen Hart fellow is...
  • Claiming every wrestler is on steroids is not advised. It's true that the WWE favors large, muscular men, but not every wrestle works a style or look that favors insane musculature, and not all of those who do use steroids.
  • Wrestlers aren't all drug addicts, and those cases of real addiction are more tragic than anything. It's part of the price they pay with their bodies for the work they do and the lengths they go to for entertainment.
  • Don't make fun of the concept of tights. Seriously. Not even the briefs. Don't.
  • Around Lucha Libre fans, don't make fun of the concept of masks. Seriously. Don't.

    Tabletop Games 
  • Dungeons & Dragons:
    • D&D has demons and devils. Many, many fans commonly mistake the two (which isn't really helped by the fact that the earliest editions just had demons, but no devils) and nearly just as many are really anal about fans who can't get it right. And when you throw in the fact that the most common kind of both demons and devils have more specific names (Tanar'ri and Baatezu respectively), it all just gets very messy, very fast. Plus other kinds like obyrith and archdevils that more pure-blooded fans know about.
    • Part of this comes from the fact that, in many versions of the game, demons and devils DO have objective differences based on Alignment: while both are always Evil, Demons are characterized as always Chaotic, Devils are always Lawful. This extends to other celestial beings like Angels, Archons, Devas, Asuras, etc., where it is less defined.
    • Furthermore, if you don't want to start an edition war, do not use past and present tenses to describe changes between 3.5 and 4th edition, e.g., "there is no lawful evil alignment anymore". And please, for the love of Pelor, DO NOT claim that one edition is objectively better unless you want to get flamed to the Nine Hells and back.
    • Misspelling "rogue" as "rouge" will get you flamed in most online fora.
    • Every edition of the game has had a major revision about halfway through in order to, depending on who you ask, fix balance issues or sell more books. The revision of third edition is officially called 3.5. The revision of second edition ("Player's Options") is frequently called 2.5 and that's no big deal. However, calling the revision of fourth edition ("Essentials") "4.5" is a berserk button among fans of that edition.
    • Since the rise of the OSR (Old School Renaissance/Revival) breathing a word about liking 4th Edition will get your ass handed to you.
  • Paranoia. Even in the game world itself, referring to The Computer as "the Computer" or, worse, "the computer" can get you executed. "Friend Computer" will do.
  • Warhammer 40,000
    • Demon is an acceptable vernacular, though the preferred word is Daemon. Lord help you if you get the A and the E confused.
    • Space Marines armies aren't "pretty much all the same". There are myriad differences between the named codices, much less the various ways the plain Space Marines codex is interpreted by both players and in-universe Marine leaders.
    • Every army in Codex: Space Marines isn't "pretty much Ultramarines". Depending on who you ask this is either Ultramarines propaganda, or egregious and atrocious canon manipulation by Matt Ward.
    • The Ultramarines themselves are polarizing. Even before Ward changed the fluff to make them the "default" loyalist army they were scorned by non-Ultramarine players because they were GW's poster boy army. However Ward's comments that every Space Marine chapter secretly looked up to the Ultramarines and beheld their primarch Roboute Guilliman as their "spiritual liege" whom they all aspired to emulate really set the Ultramarines hate to a new level. Bringing up the Ultramarines won't get you into trouble in and of itself, but mentioning the title "spiritual liege" will. Especially from a Space Wolves, Black Templars, Imperial Fists or Blood Angels player; who hold their primarchs in equally high regard.
    • Matt Ward himself is a lightning rod that will get you at least a warning on just about any 40k forum; the name itself is all but guaranteed to start a flame war.
    • Robin Cruddace less so, but he is still fairly reviled.
    • Blood Angels and Dark Angels are very different armies; do not confuse them.
    • Do not call an individual unit selected from Codex: Black Templars a singular "Black Templar". You can call them by their unit names when all else fails. You can also call them an Initiate or a Crusader.
    • They're Orks. "Orcs & Goblins" are in the other Warhammer game (see below). The K is important, especially to Ork players, who have been known to hound people til they leave a forum for making this mistake.
    • Do not call armies fielded from Codex: Space Marines "vanilla" or "generic" Space Marines without knowing your opponent really well. Many Space Marine players take offense to both terms.
      • In this specific case it's context-sensitive. In terms of building your army you can safely say "vanilla", but in terms of fielding your army the Codex is anything but.
      • This has largely crossed into dead horse territory with the 6th edition codex folding many chapters into the book and creating "Chapter Tactics". Now it's very common to ask a Space Marines player what chapter he's representing since the chapter tactics are a very important part of the metagame. Add in the litany of supplements released for chapters (Iron Hands, Imperial Fists, etc.) and pretty much nobody gets slapped with the "vanilla" label...except the Smurfs.
    • Ultramarines players, for the most part, hate being called "Smurfs". The Smurf moniker came about because of the blue armor Ultramarines wear, and the fact that Ultramarines are over-represented in fluff, artwork and special characters since they are the flagship Space Marines chapter. A simple look through the 6th Edition codex reveals five special characters for the Ultras, while no other chapter has more than 2.
    • Most non-Ultramarine players dislike the chapter to some extent, running the gamut from "a little" to "blind seething hatred". Current "most hated" GW developer Matt Ward claims them as his army and (seems to) favor them in codices and rules, while rewriting fluff he doesn't like and (allegedly) saddling armies he doesn't like with noncompetitive codices (like the Sisters of Battle). This all feeds the vitriol the chapter gets in fan communities.
    • Don't use "Real Warhammer" or "Original Warhammer" to indicate that you mean Warhammer to a 40k player. Also don't call it just "Warhammer" and assume they know what you mean. 40k-exclusive players consider 40k Real Warhammer. The accepted terms of distinction are "Fantasy" and "40k". You can also call Fantasy "Classic". Also bear in mind, a considerable population plays both.
  • Warhammer
    • This one is often overlooked, but don't called Dwarfs "Dwarves." The former is the plural in Warhammer Fantasy, the latter is the plural in The Lord of the Rings.
    • Hilariously, Tolkien actually admitted in his lifetime that he wanted the pluralization to be 'dwarfs', but thanks to his editor erroneously seeing it as an error, it was changed to Dwarves, which Tolkien then kept as 'a private piece of bad grammar'. In truth however, Tolkien always wanted to pluralize his Dwarve(f)s "dwarrow".
    • Similar to the above, don't call 40k "Real" Warhammer in front of a fantasy player. To a Fantasy-only player, this is the "Real" Warhammer. There are many things they do not like about 40k and vice versa. Just about the only term you can use to a Fantasy player is "40k". "Fantasy", "Regular" and "Classic" are all accepted terms when referring to this game. Also bear in mind, a good number of people play both.
      • The official terms used in all published materials are simply "Warhammer" and "Warhammer 40,000" - to many purists with a bent for officialdom any term like "real", "original", "fantasy" or "classic" is inappropriate (though "40k" works as a shorthand) - it's not "Warhammer Fantasy", it's just "Warhammer", because that's what it says in the books Sigmar be damned! The book of the third edition of the game (1987-1992) did have a strapline added - "Warhammer: The Game of Fantasy Battles" (the first edition of 40k was released alongside Warhammer 3rd edition, so this was probably to help distinguish them), but no other edition has ever carried this line. As such there was a brief period during the late eighties and early nineties when the official term was "Warhammer Fantasy Battle", but that has not been the case for two decades.
  • BattleTech Clan fans don't like it when you call the Timber Wolf and Summoner their Inner Sphere names MadCat and Thor. Less you want to be called a "Freebirth Stravag".
  • Saying you prefer Traditional Format is a bad idea at Yu-Gi-Oh! tournaments
  • Never ask a WARMACHINE player if they're playing Warhammer. Just...don't.

    Theatre 
  • Mention to any member of The Phantom of the Opera "phandom" how much you loved the 2004 movie version, and you're likely to get both flamed and spammed with YouTube links to "better performances".
    • Additionally, any mention of complete and total love for the sequel Love Never Dies will get you ostracized and/or ridiculed.
  • Les Misérables:
    • Inspector Javert is not just a villain.
    • In some circles, serious love for Éponine will earn you the ire of fans who assume you only like her because of her place in the love triangle and because you're probably a teenage girl.
    • And God help those who haven't read the book and aren't intending to - many fans see reading Hugo's thousand-page tome as the only true way to experience the story, and will tell you so until you agree with them.
    • You saw The Movie and thought, contrary to all the hate piled on him, that Russell Crowe did not in fact ruin the whole experience? Stay on your guard.
    • Similar to the above example, it's probably not a good idea to express fondness for Nick Jonas as Marius in the 25th anniversary concert.
  • Saying anything positive about Andrew Lloyd Webber at all is guaranteed to get you flamed to death by someone.
  • Claiming that William Shakespeare of Stratford-upon-Avon didn't write all those plays. It's excusable if you suggest that John Fletcher collaborated on a few of them, though.
  • Saying that you're a fan of Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street having only seen the movie. Or worse, not realising that it is anything other than a movie.
    • Also, the main characters' names are spelt "Sweeney Todd" (three E's, two D's) and "Lovett" (not Lovet, Lovette, Lovatt etc). This is incredibly common online, and drives some fans to Epiphany-level rage.
  • For the love of all that is holy, make sure you know what board you're on before you announce your favorite Elphaba in the Wicked fandom. The wrong answer in the wrong place will see you incinerated in a flash.

    Science 
  • Unless you are specifically aiming to torpedo your credibility, don't dismiss the Theory of Evolution as "just a theory", oversimplify it as "survival of the fittest", or ask "If humans evolved from apes, why are there still apes?" as if you have single-handedly posed The Question That Will Once And For All Destroy Darwinism.note 
    • Additionally, don't confuse the Theory of Evolution with the Big Bang, or any theories about the origins of life, neither of which it has anything to do with directly. Also, evolution in Pokémon has nothing to do with real evolution except the name (it's really more like metamorphosis/an organism's life cycle). Certain extremists have been railing on this one for a long time.
  • In general, lack of knowledge on what constitutes a thesis, a hypothesis, a theorem, a theory, and a law gets you immediately mocked in any related discussion.
  • When you enter any online science discussion, take note of the most widely quoted sources and experts and refrain from questioning them unless you want your opinion to be dismissed out of hand, even if you have legitimate grouses.
  • Some physicists and mathematicians HATE when you mispronounce "Euler", and saying it as "you-ler"note  will earn you the ire from anyone who generally knows who he was.
  • Most physicists despise the term "God Particle" often used by the media to refer to the Higgs Boson, not the least because it gets certain religious types upset for no good reason.
  • Do NOT speak seriously of the Nibiru conspiracy theory when there are astronomers around, or even astronomy enthusiasts.
  • Also, don't claim that the Sun will explode, go supernova – or worse, nova – around astronomers. It's red giant, and it's not an explosion, it's a slow burn. The Sun is not anywhere close to massive enough to go supernova, while a nova is a different thing altogether that only occurs to stars that have already collapsed into white dwarfs.
  • Don't call astronomers "astrologers". And please don't ask them if they can tell your fortune.
    • While you are at it, don't talk to (real) astrologers as though Sun sign (or "my sign") is the be all and end all of it. Admittedly, they are less likely to go berserk (due to battle fatigue) than lecture you on the subject.
  • Never ask an archaeologist if they dig up dinosaur bones. That's palaeontologists.
  • Be careful when talking about languages and language policies around sociolinguists. Considering there have been entire separationist groups based on language issues, it's not too surprising many sociolinguists are really sensitive (and may take major offense if you're not careful) to this kind of thing.
  • If you're going to argue with a scientist about a subject that has some controversy attached (global warming, evolution, vaccinations...) then you'd better do your homework. Trying to compare the work done by real scientists with the writings of a random person on a conspiracy website will not go over well. Scientists will and have refused to debate people who have no qualifications to challenge scientific theories but claim to have knowledge in the field that matches or exceeds that of someone who has dedicated their life to studying it.
  • Generally speaking, people in the "softer" sciences don't like it if you imply that their field isn't true science.
  • Ancient Aliens.
  • Many people refuse to accept the notion that Pluto is no longer a planet, especially since it hasn't been destroyed like Alderaan.
  • Paleobiology fans will NOT react well if you say that pterosaurs and dinosaurs are one and the same.
  • Never use a Virus Misnomer around microbiologists. They'll be quick to point out which diseases are viral, bacterial, or parasitic in nature. Especially because confusing a bacterium for a virus physiologically would be like confusing a bear with a flea.

    Sports 
  • While it's okay to have favorite teams in different sports, saying that you have two favorite teams in the same sports league will usually be met with much scorn and derision by sports fans. Note that this does not apply to "My two favorite teams are X and whoever's playing Y", wherein Y is X's longtime rival.
  • Calling the "Super Bowl" the "Superbowl" is considered an easy way to tell if someone is not a fan of the NFL.
  • Baseball fans have two main berserk buttons right now: performance-enhancing drugs note 
    • P.E.D.s are a hot-button issue because technically, some of baseball's greatest legends such as Mickey Mantle and Hank Aaron used performance-enhancing drugs when they were popping amphetamines in the 1950s. On the other hand, Barry Bonds. There is a significant faction of baseball fans that say that if a player used P.E.D.s at a point where they weren't outlawed, it shouldn't be held against them. The other viewpoint is simple: if you've done P.E.D.s, that's giving yourself an unfair advantage and is therefore cheating. There's not much room in between, so there's lots of arguing and very little in the way of concessions.
    • Sabermetrics have also been creeping their way into berserk button territory. The pro-sabermetric side believes that you can model, project, and describe most of baseball using trackable statistics. The anti-sabermetric side tends to believe that the intangibles and mental parts of baseball cannot be properly measured in numbers. The sabermetric crowd has been rapidly gaining in size since the internet has made sports statistics so readily available, so expect bigger clashes in the future. There was one already in 2012 where the sabermetric community vehemently disagreed with the way the AL MVP award vote turned out.
      • Even bigger is the so-called Wins Above Replacement aka WAR which says that a player is worth a certain of wins based on how they play over a replacement-level player, despite no one seems to know what a replacement-level player is.
    • A third Base Breaker in baseball is the DH rule. The AL has it, the NL doesn't. Fans of NL teams typically assert that having the DH removes strategy, fans of AL teams often say that having the pitcher hit is meaningless because they're considered an "automatic out," which is more or less true. This rule change was established in 1973, however, long enough for two generations of baseball fans to have grown up with the DH difference as a normal, uncontroversial thing. People still have opinions on it, but it's no longer a true berserk button like it used to be. Unless you're talking to a baby boomer or older, in which case just nod and agree with whatever frothy pro-DH or anti-DH rhetoric that hasn't been an issue among baseball fans since cocaine was the cool new thing.
  • Old guys like to remind you that the New York Giants are actually the New York Football Giants. It's an Artifact Title; it was originally used to denote them from the New York Baseball Giants (now in San Francisco).
    • Which is actually the team's full name, and appears on the wall behind the endzones during home games at their new stadium.
  • Pick a stadium that's been renamed by a corporate sponsorship. Any stadium. Try calling it by its sponsor name in a local sports bar. For example, "I really like going games at 3Com Park," or "...Monster Park." Proceed to get beat up by the guys who insist that it's "Candlestick Park" and it will ALWAYS BE CANDLESTICK PARK!. Go to another city and repeat. Doesn't help that all sports commentators (and many sportswriters) are required to use the corporate name exclusively and to insist everyone else use it too.
    • One of the most insane examples: The park formerly known as Comiskey. Charles Comiskey is heralded as one of the worst sports owners; he intentionally made sure his Chicago White Sox players got less meal money than the league average and often skimped on washing their uniforms. All that led to Sox players conspiring to throw the 1919 World Series in one of sports' worst scandals. The White Sox never returned to the World Series in the next 40 years of Comiskey family ownership. And yet Chicago natives still insist on calling their park Comiskey rather than the US Cellular name it currently bears.
      • We who are native Chicagoans still call it the Sears Tower, too! (there is no such thing called the "Willis" Tower on Chicago's skyline)
      • And Marshall Field's! (there is no Macy's in Chicago, or it's just Macy's on State Street, though they do make an effort to make it somewhat different from regular Macy's)
    • The only time you'll get a pass for calling a park by a corporate name is if it never had a non-corporate one, or if the non-corporate name is unknown by most fans. If the corporate sponsor changes, generally use the most well-known name, which is usually the first one.
      • At least one exception to this is Ashburton Grove, the stadium of Arsenal F.C., which is almost exclusively referred to by its sponsored name of "The Emirates" or "Emirates Stadium", even by fans. Conversely, in the same league, the City of Manchester Stadium, home to Manchester City (natch), is generally only referred to as "Etihad Stadium" by sports commentators, who are somewhat obliged to refer to stadiums and competitions by their sponsored names.
      • Although quite a few Arsenal fans, such as those on The Gooner, loathe the idea of having their stadium named after a corporation and either refer to it as "Ashburton Grove" or simply "The Grove" at times. If deciding to use the corporate name they simply call it "The E***s" like a bleeped swear word.
    • The Houston Astros offer an interesting inversion: their park was originally known as Enron Field. After the Enron scandal, the team went to court to be released from the naming rights agreement, arguing that scandal around Enron diminished the Houston Astros brand. The court agreed. Subsequently, the park was rechristened Minute Maid Park, and nobody in their right mind speaks of Enron Field anymore.
      • To revonate or not to renovate, that's a good question, just don't call the Astrodome, the Reliant Astrodome.
    • And then there's Wrigley Field, home of the Cubs — the Wrigley it's named after was the chewing-gum magnate who also owned the Cubs at the time, so technically. The old name Weeghman Park used when it opened in 1914 only lasted six years.
    • Weirdly, Cleveland's three big arenas have gotten corporate names and have mostly taken. First, Gund Arena (home of the Cavaliers) was sponsored by Quicken Loans (most people shorten it to "the Q"). Next, Jacobs Field was sponsored by Progressive Insurance (this is helped by the fact that "Progressive Field" isn't that bad of a name, though a few fans still call it "the Jake"). Most recently, after Jimmy Haslam bought the Browns and Cleveland Browns Stadium, he sold the naming rights of the stadium to First Energy. Aside from jokes about the 2003 Northeast Blackout (which FE was a major contributor to), time will tell whether that name takes as well as the other two.
    • When Newcastle United's ground got officially renamed the "Sports Direct Arena" as a means of showcasing sponsorship naming rights by the club, many Magpies fans got livid, even to the point of trying to graffiti the old name on the wall, and there was a news story of some fan who offered to buy a pint for any journalist who mentioned the stadium as "St. James' Park" instead of the new name. The club has since got a new sponsor in Wonga.com, who obvously knew what was god for them and reverted back to the old name.
    • Call the Westfalenstadion the "Signal Iduna Park" around long-time fans of Borussia Dortmund and see how many people correct you.
  • The Chicago Bears play at Soldier Field, not Soldiers' Field.
  • Try referring to a Baseball Park as a Stadium instead. Be ready to run.
    • Except for the special cases of ballparks that actually are named "[something] Stadium", especially Yankee Stadium, which is perennially called "the Stadium" by locals.
  • It's the Pittsburgh Steelers. Not Pittsburg. And not Stealers.note 
    • 'Course, some who call them the "Stealers" do so intentionally to point out the controversy behind their Super Bowl wins.
  • And it's Tottenham Hotspur, or Spurs,note  not "Tottenham Hotspurs"
  • Also, it's the Miami Heat, not Heats (Unless you're Gonzalo "Papi" Le Batard), Orlando Magic, not Magics, Oklahoma City Thunder, not Thunders, and so on.
  • Calling a foil, epee, or sabre a "sword" will get you mocked mercilessly among fencers. Getting two of them confused will get you murdered.
  • In Australia, confusing Australian Rules Football and Rugby. For that matter, in New South Wales and Queensland, confusing Rugby League and Rugby Union.
  • In most places that are not the USA,note  referring to The Beautiful Game as "soccer" will trigger The Running of the Football Hooligans. Chasing after the poor schmuck who dared call it something other than "football", that is.
  • Do not refer to Manchester United as "Man U". This was done by United fans at one time, but it led to a spate of chants by fans of other teams that used it as the first two syllables of "manure".
    • Do not get Manchester United mixed up with Manchester City, lest you be forever branded as a noob (or worse, an American). They are completely different teams – bitter rivals in fact – that wear completely different colours and play in completely different stadiums.note 
  • The storied NHL club is the Montreal Canadiens, not "Canadians". The name does not refer to "people from Canada", but rather is an Artifact Title because the term "Canadien" historically referred to French residents of the New World (in contrast to the British settlers, who were just Britons). Hence, Montreal's main French-speaking hockey club in the pre-NHL days was called "Club Canadien de Hockey" in contrast to the cross-town, English-speaking Montreal Maroons. Since the term has taken on almost the opposite meaning in the present day (where English Canadians are far more likely to embrace the identity than the Québécois are), suggesting that the hockey team's name is a reference to Canada (as opposed to French Quebeckers) is pretty much treasonous to Quebec nationalists.note 
  • If you’re cheering for your team when playing on a rival team district, like a Yankee vs. Red Sox thing at Fenway Park, know the concept of Stadium Justice when starting a fight because at times the security at that stadium would side with the hometown fan and not you.
  • If you're going to talk about NASCAR on the air, you should never under any circumstances make the claim that drivers aren't athletes. When Donovan McNabb made the claim on November 15, 2013 that Jimmie Johnson isn't an athlete, the online fandom exploded. By midnight, the hashtag #PeopleWhoAreMoreOfAnAthleteThanDonovanMcNabb was trending nationally on Twitter, with people using as examples semi-deposednote  Toronto mayor Rob Ford, or Manti T'eo's fictional girlfriend.
  • Along the same lines as the McNabb/NASCAR example above, insinuating that any form of athletic competition is "not a real sport" or its participants are "not real athletes" will almost certainly result in a backlash from fans. Along with motorsports, golf and especially cheerleading tend to be frequent targets.
  • Richie McCaw is a hugely respected star player for New Zealand's national rugby union team, the All Blacks. Fans don't take kindly to accusations that his success is less than fully deserved. The comedy TV show Pulp Sport featured a bet between the hosts where the loser had to walk to an All Blacks game holding a "McCaw Is A Cheat" sign; the commentator for the game later joked he was "lucky to still be alive".
  • Rugby Union doesn't have rules, it has laws. Ignore this when talking to a rugby fan at your peril.
  • Refer to any supplement as a steroid in front of a Body Builder, or say they are similar, or say they have a similar use, or say that there is no difference between the two. If that Body Builder doesn't just lay a beating on you, he's sure to go off on a diatribe about why supplements are definitely not steroids.
  • The only team you can refer to as "the All Blacks" is the 15-man team that plays in Rugby Championships and World Cups. Never refer to the Maori All Blacksnote  or the All Blacks Sevensnote  as "the All Blacks", or assume they are the same.
  • There is a growing community of fans who will tell you in absolute terms that e-sports are sports and there's nothing you can do about it. However, almost no one refers to the competitors as athletes for obvious reasons.

    Toys 
  • Transformers:
    • There was an IRC chat back in the mid 90s where the admin would kickban any user who referred a particular character by any name other than "Dezaras". "Deathsaurus" was forbidden, "Deaths-R-Us" was right out, and "Death Czarus?" Well, you know the drill.
    • So who's the blue robot, Frenzy or Rumble? This question, when ask, will prompt other fans either saying "You had to go there, didn't you?" or straight-out causing flame wars.
    • The issue of third-party Transformers toys have become this and have effectively split the fandom into two camps; the one that sees them as being on the same level of dollar store knock-offs (despite costing vastly more and being of infinitely higher quality), one that believes they are the only way of getting fan favorite characters/alt modes since Hasbro/Takara doesn't care about adult fans (The Generations/Masterpiece line and recent G1 reissues not withstanding).
  • As Gabe discovered, LEGO fans are all too ready to point out that the plural of LEGO is LEGO.
    • Funnily enough, this rule gets broken in the first LEGO Island game when DJ Radio delivers the headline "LEGOs in SPACE!".note 
    • The company that makes them used to specifically make the point on the packaging that they should be called "LEGO bricks or toys" and not "LEGOs". They were worried about their trademark becoming genericized, as happened to, say, aspirin, escalator, and linoleum.
    • Just try referring to either of the original villains from LEGO Adventurers as "Sam Sinister" and watch the Flame Wars erupt.note 
  • Calling Toa or Matoran "BIONICLEs" will result in a massive Internet Backdraft. Pluralizing the title will get you obliterated.
    • Also, there is a reason why BIONICLE is not under the LEGO section in this folder. Do not refer to BIONICLE as "that LEGO story" or otherwise try and imply that it is "just a story used to sell toys".

    Universities & Colleges 
  • Fans of Stanford University's sports teams will not hesitate to loudly and frequently remind you that their team is the Stanford Cardinal, not the Cardinals. That is, they are Cardinal, the shade of red, not Cardinals, the birds (or Catholic leaders). Gods help you if you suggest that their mascot is a cardinal. note 
  • It's Johns Hopkins University. As in, both words end in the letter s. Not "John Hopkins", and definitely not "John Hopkin." The founder's parents decided to name him "Johns" (after his mother's family name) rather than "John." It's led to over a century of irritated students and alumni correcting people who can't possibly believe that it would be "Johns", even people who really should know better (like long-time Baltimore residents). Also, while the medical school is the most famous part of Hopkins, it offers areas of study as varied as any other top research university. Assuming that everyone who attends Hopkins is studying to become a doctor is a great way to irritate the majority who are not.
    • Similarly, pronouncing the "h" in "Amherst" will mark you as an outsider to any Amherst student or townie. Also, assuming that an Amherst College student means U Mass when s/he says s/he went to "Amherst" will not endear you to him/her.
  • Do not refer to Maize as yellow in the context of the University of Michigan's color. Likewise, do not refer to Rutgers' scarlet or Harvard's and Alabama's crimson as red.

    Video Games 
  • Asking about the bit-size of contemporary video game consoles (I.e. By asking if or saying the Xbox 360 is 360-bit) or using a consoles bit size as a way of determining a consoles whole technical power is guaranteed to get people annoyed or get you laughed out of a more tech savvy community. To begin with, the whole "Bits=better graphics and more powerful hardware" misconception was pure marketing hogwash started by Sega with their Sega Genesis ads (the loaded term came about simply because it was easier to market the consoles superior power to the NES that way) and this was likewise imitated by many other video game companies. This misconception carried all the way to the 2000s, where the term slowly but finally became obsolete and tech savvy people came to realize that it's everything built around the bits of a console that determines it's true capabilities. And to note, consoles like the PS3 and 360 have 64-bit CPUs, and even consoles from the so-called "128 bit era" actually had 32 or 64 bit architecture (I.e. the Sega Dreamcast and PlayStation 2).
  • Asking for Super Mario Bros. 4 to be made will lead irked fans to point out that it already exists with the subtitle Super Mario World in Japan - it was simply shortened to only being referred to by the subtitle in most other regions.
  • Don't you dare call the Distressed Damsel in the Donkey Kong arcade game "Peach". The damsel in that game is not Princess Peach but Pauline, who isn't a princess and returned in the Mario vs. Donkey Kong games.
  • This trope was originally named after the Big Bad Ganondorf, aka Ganon, from The Legend of Zelda, who is commonly believed to have gotten an additional "N" in his name in the original game. The reality is more complicated. "Gannon" was used in Japan in the first two games at the very least, and was the official romanization up until that point. This can be seen in Zelda II's intro text and game over screen, and the third game's end credits, where it refers to "Gannon's Tower". Whether due to a simple error or a deliberate choice, the American manual of the original game favored the spelling Ganon, and beginning with Zelda II, the American localizers explicitly went out of their way to change the spelling in-game, giving the appearance that the original three-N form was a simple misspelling, rather than an artifact of the Japanese version.
    • Claiming that there is only one Link, that the games were released in chronological order, etc., is liable to get you laughed out of any timeline forum. The timeline given in Hyrule Historia is, for the most part, canon.
      • Sadly, Nintendo itself (at least the American branch) seems to think that there is only one Link. Just look at the official Zelda site's encyclopedia article on Link. Much of the information on the encyclopedia is actually fanfiction anyway.
      • Referring to Zelda.com's encyclopedia as any sort of authority is actually a good way to get edit blocked on the Zelda wikis. Being that the site is run by marketers rather than the localization team, a lot of facts get skewed.
      • Also, saying that Super Smash Bros. or Soul Calibur II is canon to the Zelda timeline can sometimes evoke serious hatred.
    • The "Tetra"force theory, the theory that there are four pieces to the Triforce, receives quite a bit of hate.
    • Call Link "Zelda" around any LoZ fan and prepare to get yelled at.
    • For your own safety, don't call the Zelda games RPGs.
    • In recent years, it has become a serious crime to refer to The Wind Waker as kiddy in certain fan groups. Link stabbing Ganondorf through the head may be a big contribution to this.
    • Also, don't call Link an "elf" in front of a Zelda fan unless you want to be slapped upside your face for being a complete n00b. You'll also probably get a huge speech about how Link is NOT an elf but rather a Hylian, the main race in the games. According to every non-human entity in those games, Hylians are humans. Presumably the ears are just long compared to other, normal-eared humans in the games (such as the ones inhabiting the countries used for the settings of The Legend of Zelda Oracle games, which have round ears) as Hylians don't have, for example, extended lifespans or other traits associated with elves.
      • It doesn't help that some materials do make the distinction between "elven" Hylians and "non-elven" humans. The main difference between Hylians and humans, apart from the pointy ears, is that Hylians are the descendants of the Goddess Hylia (in Zelda's form), while humans, we can assume, don't have the blood of Hylia. It also seems that Hylians have mystic abilities that humans don't. The best way of putting it would be that Hylians are human, but humans aren't Hylian. Hylians can therefore be compared to a race, within the species. Still, don't refer to Hylians as elves.
    • Majora's Mask is not "Zelda 2", no matter how much Sequel Displacement Ocarina of Time created.
    • A Link Between Worlds is not a remake of A Link to the Past, but a sequel taking place in the same version of Hyrule. Certainly not helped by Shigeru Miyamoto originally considering remaking it before Eiji Aonuma convinced him to make an original game.
  • Golden Sun. Go ahead and ask what is this vague thing called "Ninja and Samurai" classes for your characters in the forums. You will be ignored. This is because knowing how to get those two classes is a fundamental knowledge for those who play Golden Sun.
    • To be fair they require a specific amount of Djinn on a specific kind of adept (Only Mercury Adepts are off-limits to those classes). The guide does actually mention this but if you discovered this game years after its release...
    • Mention Golden Sun: Dark Dawn to the fans and their general reply is either "Sveta is the best character" to "Earth Adepts have no personality" to "the game is too easy", the latter being not an appropriate subject to discuss no matter what your stance is.
  • Sonic the Hedgehog:
    • Go to a random community, mention "Hyper Shadow", and watch Satan himself flinch in fear of the backlash you get.
    • For that matter, mention any of old backstory used in English speaking countries prior to Sonic Adventure and you'll likely be blasted by a group of "Only the Japanese stuff counts" purists. Which will then trigger a war with the "It's our childhood memories and we don't care if it's not really canon" fans.
    • Calling Metal Sonic "Mecha Sonic" will earn you the ire of Sonic fans. Likewise, do not confuse Metal Sonic any other Sonic robot.note 
    • Mixing up the British/Egmont/Fleetway comic with the American/Archie comic around fans of either comic is liable to get you eaten alive.
    • Questioning whether the events of Sonic '06 really happened is also good Flame Bait despite the ending hinting at the characters possibly remembering the events of the game as well as part of Sonic Generations taking place during the supposedly erased events of said game.
      • Speaking of Sonic 2006, don't try to call it a good game in front of a Sonic gamer. Yes, it's full of bugs and game breaking glitches, because of that no one can like it. If you like it, you are wrong. Or at least, that's what the fans say.
    • Really want to set some fans off? Type "Sonic X was a good anime." I dare you.
      • Or alternatively, say any of the Creator/{{4Kids|Entertainment}} voice actors were good. Apparently, that's evil only Julius Robotnik could appreciate.
    • Tails is not a girl, and never has been (despite always being voiced by one in Japanese, and since 2004 in English). People will gladly tell you this repeatedly.
      • He is in Mexico. Though, only in the old cartoons, they fixed their mistake later.
    • Calling Amy Rose "Amy the Hedgehog" will give you some flak, though you can get into a debate that her full name is "Amy Rose the Hedgehog". Likewise calling Tekno from the Fleetway comics "Techno" is a bad idea.
      • You can get similar reactions with "Tails the Fox." (His name is Miles "Tails" Prower.)
    • Debating whether Ivo's real name is "Robotnik" or "Eggman" is another classic flame war kickstarter. This is primarily due to his Japanese name always being Eggman while the English versions of the game had his name as Robotnik during the classic era (and both during SA1). Due to the confusion, Sega brought it into both versions that his real birth name was Robotnik, yet everyone, including himself, calls him Eggman so that they didn't have a character with two canonical names. Despite this being confirmed canon however, it worked as well as Miyamoto's gender confirmation.
    • Oh and do NOT spell Rouge the Bat's name as Rogue.
    • Bringing up whether or not Sonic is the speed of light is one of the easiest ways to get into a Flame War with a Sonic fan.
    • Any mention of My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic. The flame wars between the Bronies and the Sonic fandom almost went nuclear (not literally, of course) when news came out that Dave Polsky, who writes for Friendship Is Magic, is the head writer of Sonic Boom with Sonic fans crying Ruined FOREVER by the pony-taint.
    • There is a small group of fanboys who has never let go of the 16-bit Console Wars and are opposed to anything Nintendo. During the success of the Wii, any mention of its success would send these people foaming at the mouth demanding Nintendo's destruction, or at least demotion to a 3rd-party company, as sour grapes over Nintendo's victory over SEGA during that generation. With the Wii U not doing quite as hot, they are now in gloat mode and cry out at the Nintendo exclusivity deal.
    • The Sonic fanbase is so fractured to tiny atomic pieces that pretty much anything can set off rage from a Sonic fan. Get a particularly negative group together, and it seems like the only things whose mention don't ignite a flame war are Sonic (sometimes) and, for some reason, Batman: The Animated Series.
  • Mega Man:
    • In some fan communities, there are those who will insist on using only the Japanese names (Rockman instead of Mega Man, Forte instead of Bass, etc.) and will insist that only the events as detailed in the Japanese games are "true", even if the community is based on the American games with American fans or if the fan-work being discussed is explicitly based on the American continuity.
    • Insisting on using the alternate names for Mega Man X5 characters will lead to backdraft.
    • Referring to the primary villain of the original series as "Dr. Wiley" is a bad idea. Calling him "Dr. Willy" is an even worse one.
    • Pronouncing Bass's name wrong is another easy way to annoy fans, not helping that Mega Man 8's dub pronounces it as this. To note, it's pronounced "bayss" (like the clef, upright giant stringed instrument, or guitar), not the name of the fish.
    • Try asking on a Mega Man forum why you can't see through the water in Pirate Man's stage. Your E-Plane will be gunned down in flames by angry purists pissed off that you pirated the game rather than buying it legitnote . Hypocrites.
    • There are several Mega Men (or is it Mega Mans?) with their own respective sub-series (Classic, X, Legends, Battle Network, Zero, ZX, and Star Force). It's best not to confuse them with one another, such as recalling a specific Mega Man and saying he's from a game of a sub series he's not featured in (ex: "Mega Man X is awesome! He's such a cool fighter in Mega Man Legends 2!"). In addition, clumping all of the Mega Men together by saying they're the same character isn't a wise move.
      • Calling X "Mega Man X" in general is best avoided, since the name is officially used so rarely many fans believe he's officially just "X".
      • In the case of Zero, try to avoid calling him a "Mega Man", even though the name of his own sub-series says otherwise. He is never actually referred to as "Mega Man Zero", as the characters will always call him "Zero", as they did in the X series. The sub series is called "Mega Man Zero", because Capcom wanted consumers to know it was a part of the general Mega Man franchise.
      • This was actually poked fun at in Zero's ending in Marvel vs. Capcom 3. Silver Surfer is pretty much an Audience Surrogate of people outside the Mega Man fandom with his response to Zero after transporting him to Neo Arcadia, a setting seen in the Mega Man Zero series:
      Zero: "I'm Zero, not Mega Man Zero."
      Silver Surfer: "Perplexing indeed. I cannot tell the difference between any of these worlds."
    • Some people claim that Zero is female (when actually he isn't), because of his long hair and the gems in his chest being mistaken for breasts.
  • Go ahead and call Hyperspeed in Guitar Hero a "cheat". Don't expect to last long on any forum, official or not.
    • Also, don't call Rock Band a Guitar Hero knockoff. You will be bludgeoned to death with various plastic fake instruments.
  • Don't mention Guitar Hero or Rock Band in the presence of the Bemani fandom. Or vice versa.
    • Don't mention to beatmania IIDX players that you use Assist mods, or to drummania players that you use Auto mods.
    • Don't talk about VOCALOID or Touhou arranges in Sound Voltex to the more traditionalist side of the BEMANI fanbase.
    • Dance Dance Revolution, Pump It Up, and In The Groove: Mentioning that using the bar is a Game Breaker or outright cheating, particularly amongst top-tier and competitive players, is a sure-fire way to end up on a dance game machine...with your whole body face down on the pads...bruised up.
    • The mere addition of a new DJ YOSHITAKA song that's part of the Hard Renaissance or Trance Core series gets Western BEMANI fans very mad.
  • Confusing speedruns and TASs is not recommended. Trying to pass off a TASnote  as a console speedrun is heavily looked down upon by both the speedrunning and TAS-making communities. For that matter, calling a TAS "fake" or "cheated" is a bad idea too.
  • Have you insinuated in any way on League of Legends that you may be Brazilian? May God have mercy on your wretched soul...
    • Same thing applies to any Dota 2 players from South America or Russia
  • Final Fantasy IV has this persistant FWAK entry about Palom and Porom note  in several walkthroughs with FWAK entries in them. Repeating them in forums can be a bad idea.
  • Final Fantasy VI, like Final Fantasy IV before, has FWAK entriesnote . You'd better be planning to stay off the Internet for a while after repeating them in forums.
    • Don't mention Sonic.exe on a video of Kefka's laugh,or say that Sonic.exe came first.
  • That being said, if you've got a good half-hour to kill, refer to Final Fantasy IV or Final Fantasy VI as Final Fantasy II and Final Fantasy III, respectively. You'll get responses ranging from a protracted explanation of why you're wrong to an absolute perfect storm of drama.
  • Some old-school fans of Final Fantasy VII still nostalgically cling to "Aeris". Others have been arguing that it was supposed to be "Aerith" since long before the official spelling changed. And a certain amount of Compilation-era fans are just confused when they get around to playing the original. Tread lightly, young grasshopper.
  • Hilarity Ensues if you refer to Squall Leonheart as Squall Lionheart or, God forbid, Leon Loire.
    • Better yet, trot out the (Jossed by Ultimania) theory that Ultimecia is the future version of Rinoa.
  • If you equip the Dusk Shard or the Dawn Shard in Final Fantasy XII, don't go on a forum asking people why your MP doesn't go above zero or why you can't get rid of the Silence status. At best, you'll be told to read the freaking item description and at worst you'll be flamed worse than what a Firaga spell will do to you.
  • There are people who tend to complain about the Shadaloo bosses having the "wrong names" whenever they get to play the Japanese version of a Street Fighter game, unaware of the fact that the names were actually switched for the overseas version of the series: the black boxer M. Bison became Balrog overseas, the Spanish Ninja Balrog became Vega, and the Shadaloo overlord Vega became M. Bison.
    • Also, using "Shadowlaw," "Shadowloo," or "Shadaloo" will garner criticism depending on where you are.
  • In Deus Ex, early pirated copies of the game (that didn't include sound because of the internet speed at the time of release) would not allow players to get on the boat and go from the 1st level to the 2nd because the game required a sound clip play (and the soundclip wasn't present in the pirated copy). This has leads to pirates marking themselves as such by asking "How I get on the boat" [sic] questions on various fourms. Flame Wars tend to ensue.
  • There's a lot of nastiness in Pokémon fandom over names. It usually results from differing translations or romanizations, works of dubious canonicity, and good old fashioned obtuseness.
    • When Pokémon was first starting to get popular, kids would cringe whenever their parents (or some other adult figure) pronounced Pokémon as "Pokey-man" or "Pokemons".
    • Go ahead and call the Pokémon Red and Blue player character "Ash". See how fast you get eaten alive. His name is "Red".
      • Mistaking any counterpart (Ash and Red, Red and Red, Ruby and Brendan, etc) for each other will get you berated by dozens of fans quickly.
      • Calling Blue "Gary" is a hot button but a lot of fans have begun using precisely because it upsets others.
      • Depending who you're around, calling the protagonists their Fan Nickname's (Ethan as "Gold", Brendan as "Ruby", Hilbert as "Black", etc) will cause trouble.
    • Whether Aloe/Lenora of Pokémon Black and White is a racist stereotype or not (discussion is banned on the Bulbagarden forums).
      • Similarly, questioning what Iris' race is.
    • Probably the biggest Berserk Button for anyone who consumes a greater portion of their time on this franchise than other do on average is to exclaim that Generation I is the best generation (and to some extent Generation II) and that all the following generations could hardly be called "true" Pokémon. Such closed-minded nostalgia is never tolerated by the fandom.
    • A Fire/Fighting starter. note  In fact, even a mention of that type combination can result in a lot of hate getting directed at you.
    • Even mentioning Brendan is this due to the debates on whether he wore a hat or had oddly colored hair (it's confirmed to be a hat but that still leaves debate open to whether he has black hair or a Multicolored Hair).
    • While it's often an interesting topic for Dark Fic, never claim that Pokémon is just "glorified dog/cock fighting". The entire fandom will yell at you for missing the franchise's message of teamwork and friendship, that Pokémon are never seriously hurt during battles and actually enjoy fighting, and that you're probably a member of Team Plasma. PETA learned this the hard way.
    • Oh, and the games are made by Game Freak, not Nintendo. They are just exclusive to Nintendo consoles.
      • Actually, it is okay to say that Pokémon is a Nintendo game. note  Just don't forget the Game Freak part. The actual story is: "Game Freak develops the games under agreement with Nintendo, and the two companies jointly publish/release/sell the completed games."
    • Never assume Slowbro would evolve into Slowking.note  Although an honest mistake made by non-fans, casuals and actual fans who forgot the little detail, you'll receive a lot of messages and replies reminding you otherwise (that, and mockingly comparing you to the very memetic Slowpoke).
  • Devil May Cry fans used to have a civil war over whether one of the bosses in the original game was named Nelo Angelo or Nero Angelo. This has been laid to rest with the introduction of a character named Nero who is distinct from the aforementioned boss.
    • Related, there was a BIG uproar in the time leading up to Devil May Cry 4 about whether or not Vergil, Dante's brother and Nelo Angelo was dead after the events of the first game. The enemy data files in 4 put the rumors of his survival to rest hard, saying that the Bianco Angelo enemies were actually created by using pieces of his corpse.
    • Just mention DmC: Devil May Cry to a fan of the series. Just let me get to a safe distance first.
  • Gamers have a tendency to flip out at people (especially journalists) who get the name of the their favorite console wrong, like when people refer to the Nintendo DS as the "Game Boy DS". Variants include calling all handhelds Game Boys and all consoles X-Boxes, or calling anything other than the company or the NES simply "Nintendo".
    • Especially when they call the Playstation and Xbox consoles by their proper names, but all Nintendo consoles are simply "a Nintendo". Many Nintendo fans are annoyed by this. However, it seems to be more or less accepted to refer to the Nintendo Entertainment System as "Nintendo" (which makes the SNES the "Super Nintendo").
    • Referring to the 3DS as just "DS" can result in this. It's not just a "new DS", it's a new console with its own games.
      • This is also true of the Game Boy and the Game Boy Color, which isn't helped by the fact that Brawl's Chronicle lists their games under the same column.
      • Something very similar happened with the 2DS, with people thinking that it was both a completely new console and an indication of a complete abandonment of the 3D feature. Not only is it not a new console (aside from the omission of 3D and the design, the hardware is exactly the same), but the 2DS was made specifically for younger consumers who fall out of the minimum age range to use the 3D, with the option to get a unit with 3D still being available.
  • Go to the Escape Velocity: Nova webboard and ask about the "Vellos", "Velos","Vell-Os", or (God forbid) the "Vell'Os", and somebody is sure to point out that they are called the "Vell-os".
  • This trope can go either way, in that Pyramid Head (debuting in Silent Hill 2) has been seen in other games and the movie. Some rabid fans say that this is NOT okay, Pyramid Head to them is only a representation of James' psyche. However, other fans view him as a God of Silent Hill.
    • And don't call him Red Pyramid, whatever you do.
      • it's important to note that Word of God listed him as an executioner, which you'd think would make the debate easier to handle, but still causes massive arguments between what that means and how exactly he is an "executioner". Then there's the Butcher which sometimes may or may not be lumped into that same conversation. As a rule of thumb, don't mention the Butcher and Pyramid head at the same time.
  • In general with Silent Hill, there are a LOT of fandom rules.
    • Do not Compare Silent Hill 1 and it's reimagining, Silent Hill Shattered Memories. You will die for it.
    • Be careful if you say Silent Hill 2 was not your favorite. Some people might say Three, some may even say Downpour, but overall most will say that your opinion is garbage.
    • Bring up Heather's physical flaws from Silent Hill 3 in a bad light or compare her to the second movies appearance. People will hate you for not doing the research on why Heather is blemished.
    • Silent Hill 4 is a landmine. If you like it, be EXTREMELY careful who you say that to.
    • That goes for Origins as well.
    • Don't mention Homecoming. Just. Do. Not. Do. It. Save yourself the headache from an SH fan.
    • Be careful who you say you enjoyed Shattered Memories to and why. Some fandom members will understand if you say the story was good, others will outright shun you altogether as many simply ignore its existence (this is partially the games fault and also partially a Nintendo argument as it was on the Wii first for a while.)
    • Liking Downpour seems okay. Comparing Downpour (a western developed SH game) to 1, 2, or 3 (the Japanese developed games) will either spark a debate or get fandom members trying to choke you through a monitor.
    • If you are not a fan of Silent Hill but genuinely enjoyed the movies, DO NOT BRING THIS UP AROUND A SILENT HILL FAN. You will be nagged to death about the inconsistencies, the poor story (etc) until you want to kill yourself. This goes double for Revelations.
    • Bringing up the comic books written by Scott Cienson is okay if the intent is to bash them. Bringing them up otherwise may get you deported entirely from the fandom.
    • DO NOT UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES WHATSOEVER CALL THE INCUBUS "SAMAEL". If you are in the presence of any Silent Hill fans, you might as well save yourself the trouble and just off yourself immediately.
      • Additionally, do not call Pyramid Head "Valtiel" or Valtiel "Pyramid Head without his helmet". While some fans may debate what Pyramid Head looks like underneath the helmet, claiming the two are the same is not allowed.
  • Go on Xbox LIVE and claim that the Gears of War shotgun is for noobs. Expect a huge hail of insults or a rapidly increasing number of deaths if you happen to play the game (a jarring number of them from friendly fire).
  • In Metroid fandom, calling Samus "Metroid" or even, God forbid, saying "I love Metroid, he's so cool in these games" is considered a horrible crime. Likewise, thinking she's a he is also considered very, VERY bad.
    • Mentioning Metroid: Other M near the fandom can get them on edge. Claiming that the story was good and the characters (especially Samus) are well-written or vice versa can get them over the edge and into a full-fledged Flame War.
    • When it comes to Super Smash Bros., suggesting that fan-favorite Ridley shouldn't be a playable character because he is "too big" is a sure way to invoke the fandom's wrath, with them angrily pointing out that Super Smash Bros. is essentially a non-canon fighting series that has and will flagrantly abuse the trope Not Drawn to Scale for the sake of entertainment. It doesn't help that many of these "arguments" are often started by trolls.
  • Go onto a forum and say ''Meta-Knight'' or "MetaKnight" is your favorite character. You will not hear the end of it. "His name is Meta Knight, damn it! Meta-Knight is the group of swordsmen and MetaKnight doesn't exist! RAHHHHH, IT MATTERS! YOU'RE NOT A REAL FAN!"
    • Same with calling King Dedede "King DeDeDe".
    • Paint Roller's name is Paint Roller. NOT Skainter. It's supposed to be a clever pun. Besides, try saying "Skainter" out loud. It just hurts.
      • Although deliberately provoking somebody by using Skainter would be painful trolling, so it kinda wraps back around in a meta sense.
    • Don't call Kirby a girl just because he's pink. If you're lucky, a fan will just politely correct you.
    • Misspelling spelling the villain in Kirby Triple Deluxe as Daranza instead of Taranza is also a no-no as it's a "Blind Idiot" Translation Fan Nickname. It was less bad before the official localization, though.
  • Star Fox is the name of the mercenary unit where Fox McCloud works. It is NOT his name. This misconception isn't helped by the fact that Andross seemingly uses this name to refer to Fox at the end of Star Fox 64 (Andross was actually talking about the team in general, but in context it looks like he's just addressing Fox, who is alone at the time).
  • Spelling Jak's name with an added c or Daxter with an e is a Berserk Button for many Jak and Daxter fans. If you're lucky, they'll facepalm and point out your mistake. If not, they'll eat you alive.
  • When someone looks at some piece of Touhou fanart and asks "What anime is this?" flames are to be expected.
    • Speaking of Touhou: Around fans of the Shoot 'em Up genre, DO NOT mention that you like anything about it other than the games themselves.
      • This actually can ascend to a lot of anime fandoms (mainly anime fandoms rather than video game fandoms where Touhou resides) heavily disliking Touhou due to its over saturation on many forums and image boards. In general Touhou is a hot button depending on who you're talking to and how you talk about it.
      • Also, if you say "Touhou is harder" on a video of a CAVE game, you'll probably get punched in the stomach.
    • Go ahead and say that you play on Easy difficulty. The number of people who don't recite the "EASY MOODO?!" part of "Overdrive" will be countable on one hand.
    • There are a lot of fans who play the games but struggle with them. Do NOT, under any circumstances, EVER mention that there are more difficult shoot-em-ups or that there are non-danmaku shooters that are more difficult.
    • Calling Flandre's theme (U.N. Owen was her?) the "Ran Ran Ru" song is a good way to get tempers flaring.
    • Find a group of Touhou fans and tell them that ZUN's music sucks. They will be all too happy to beat it into you how wrong you are.
    • In Japan, writing Doujin where Marisa refers to herself with the masculine pronoun "ore" will immediately get you dismissed as a non-fan who's just using Touhou characters to get more sales.note 
  • EarthBound:
    • Never mention the "Giygas fetus theory" on a forum. You WILL get banned (temporarily, at least).
    • Do not ask for a Fan Translation of Mother 3 that has no profanity in it. Aside from being just plain ungrateful considering how long said fan translation was in production, the first such member to raise a fuss over the issue was extremely immature about the whole thing (although the member in question has long since gotten over it).
    • Also, his name's Porky, not Pokey. Claiming his name is Pokey will result in some serious hatred, especially after the release of Super Smash Bros. Brawl confirmed this.
  • Treating Xenoblade as anything less but one of the best games ever or opposing Shulk for Super Smash Bros. does not sit well with fans. You'll be accused of Complaining about Shows You Don't Watch, whether you like it or not.
    • For your convenience, pronounce the first "e" in Xenoblade with a long "e".
    • Also about the title, don't call the Monado the Xenoblade.
    • Unless you're prepared for it, don't talk about ShulkxFiora. That leaves you wide open for Ship-to-Ship Combat with ShulkxMelia fans. And vice versa.
    • And for some circles, don't refer to it as "Xenoblade Chronicles", since only the English version has that subtitle, which breaks the previously established One-Word Title Naming Convention by adding a Stock Subtitle for no discernible reason.
  • The main character of Kid Icarus is Pit. Trying to say his name is Icarus will get you laughed out of any Nintendo forum.
  • The surprisingly widespread popularity of Slender led to a sudden wave of newcomers to the fandom who think the title is the name of the main antagonist. This is almost guaranteed to send long-time Slender Man fans into an eye-twitching rage. For the record, Slender is the game, Slender Man is the character.
    • In that same vein and depending on the forum/blog you're commenting on, saying Slendy's full name is "Slenderman" rather than "Slender Man" will get some fans of the Mythos very, very angry with you. Other fans really couldn't care less how it's spelled as long as you're not calling it "Slender," and a few will respond by making jokes about LittleKuriboh's "Concrete Giraffes" and "Jack Slenderman, the cop who doesn't play by the rules" or Saul Slendamann.
    • When discussing Slender Man's powers and abilities, be extremely careful not to mention time as being the fourth dimension in fourth dimensional theory. Science buffs will want to kill you since the 4th dimension and Time are unrelated.
    • When talking to fandom members, do not immediately start saying that Slendy is after you or you just saw him, everyone will immediately hate you for it.
    • Try to keep theories of Slendy to a minimum around hardcore fans unless you're trying to provoke a shouting match.
    • One of the worst possible moves that will immediately get your online life murdered by Slendy enthusiasts is to state that Slender Man is based on the game Slender. You can leave, but chances are wherever you said that will never welcome you back. Also, do not offhandedly refer to characters that are proxies as "Masky" unless you're talking about Tim/Masky, Marble Hornets fans will want you dead.
    • It's pronounced "Slender-MAHN", not "Slender-MUHN". This wouldn't be a problem, except people who discovered the mythos through Slender becoming popular aren't aware of this.
  • Don't even think about calling World of Warcraft's Mists of Pandaria expansion a ripoff of Kung Fu Panda. Pandaren were first introduced in Warcraft 3, five years before the movie was released.
  • It used to be that this would happen if you suggested a third-party character for Super Smash Brothers. After Brawl, this is only in effect if it's a character that has no history on Nintendo systems whatsoever (e.g. Master Chief) or is a character from a media other than video games (Goku, for example).
    • If you want people to hate you for the rest of their lives, mention items. If you want tourneyfans to kill you on the spot, mention that you play as Meta Knight. Mentioning that Smash Bros. fans see Meta Knight as this around Kirby fans might garner a similar reaction.
  • Assassin's Creed III faces a triple-dose of this problem. Getting any of the following wrong is bait for serious backlash:
    • The protagonist is a half-Mohawk whose real name is Ratonhnhaké:ton, which is nearly impossible to spell correctly. The fandom is generally pretty lenient on this one.
    • Because of the cultural difficulty in using his real name, Ratonhnhaké:ton is re-named (in-universe) as "Connor". Don't make the mistake of spelling it "Conner", it annoys a lot of people.
    • Furthermore, as his father's family name was "Kenway", many people (including some promotional materials) have taken to calling him "Connor Kenway", despite the fact that Ratonhnhaké:ton/Connor never takes on his father's last name. Fans are quick and harsh in correcting this.
  • Go ahead and say that Apollo is better then Phoenix on a Ace Attorney forum. Or the other way around for that matter. You'll get a front seat to a flamewar between Phoenix and Apollo fans.
    • Likewise, saying that your favorite game in the series is any other then the first or third ones will get you completely torn apart with rage by people who are insistent that their opinion is the only valid one.
    • Don't even bother saying whether you think Phoenix is gay or straight. Same goes for Edgeworth. Changes are that you're talking to someone who completely disagrees and will make this known.
      • On this point, talking about ships AT ALL will get you a flame war with Ace Attorney. Especially saying that you don't like Phoenix/Edgeworth or Phoenix/Maya.
    • Don't go onto a forum and say you did not find the last cases of the games (1-5, 2-4, 3-5 and 4-4) to be that great. People will kill you, except maybe for that last one... unless you managed to gain the attention of an Apollo Fan.
  • It's NiGHTS. Not Nights, not NIGHTS.
  • No, the Wii U is NOT a "new controller for the Wii", it's a new console. The controller is called the "Gamepad", and is NOT the console itself - the console is a box similar to other consoles. The controller is also NOT a "tablet", it's a tablet-based controller called the Gamepad. It's gotten so bad that Nintendo had to send out a notice to everyone's Wii console to remind them that the Wii-U is, in fact, a brand new console and not an add on for the Wii whatsoever, as seen in this commercial here, basically calling out less knowledgeable parents who play this trope straight.
  • Left 4 Dead 2 has Bill Killed Off for Real. Despite what people and rumors tell you, Bill is dead. You can't revive him with a Magical Defibrillator, he is not "sleeping", and using mods to bring him back does not count. Trying to use any argument based on Fanon Discontinuity will get you mocked and viewed as someone who can't accept canon.
  • Say anything positive about Tharja from Fire Emblem Awakening. At all. Be ready for angry detractors to accuse you of supporting child abuse.
    • Don't mention Priam's name around Ike/Soren shippers. Actually, don't discuss Priam's liniage at all. And don't even think about mentioning Sumia's name around Chrom/Female Avatar shippers. Or claim any Avatar pairing is "canon".
    • For a while following the announcement of Fire Emblem: The Sacred Stones's localization, using the localized names would get the old-school elitist fans screeching and throwing fits.
  • Many Crash Bandicoot fans are not hesitant to rip you to shreds for calling the wumpa fruits "apples" or "peaches."
  • Back when PlayStation All-Stars Battle Royale was first announced, Nintendo fans claimed that it was a rip-off of Super Smash Bros. Even after the game was released and the gameplay was shown to be very different from SSB, the Nintendo fandom still complains about it. If they don't say that PSASBR sucks because it copied SSB, they say that it didn't copy SSB enough.
    • Furthermore, some fans are so obsessed that they try to find ridiculous excuses to insult PSASBR, by comparing completely unrelated stuff. For example, some say that Pa Rappa the Rapper copied Mr. Game & Watch, Ape Escape copied Donkey Kong, or that Polygon Man copied Master Hand, when actually he existed way before SSB was created and he is Older than You Think.
  • Do not even try to say "Unreal is the same/worse as Quake!" in proximity of an Unreal fan. Or you might end up ripped to shreds by his Flak Cannon.
    • Or vice versa...
  • It is not wise to refer to Lara Croft as "Laura Croft". Or "Lara Craft". Or calling her "Tomb Raider."
    • Likewise, insisting that every Tomb Raider game is set within the same continuity (there are in fact three separate ones within the "main" series due to two reboots) is likely to irritate quite a few fans. Even more so if you try to bring the movies and the comics into it.
    • Calling the series as a whole, it's first reboot or the latest one "an Uncharted rip-off" is close to a death wish. At least with the last game the confusion is possible and justifiable, so fans tent to be lenient about it. But God help you if you decide to compare any of the previous games, especially those made long before Uncharted debut.
    • Same applies to comparisons with Indiana Jones. It will almost inevetably end with a lenghty lecture how Core Design put a lot of effort to distance themselves from Indy.
    • Favouring any of the continuities - all three have their devoted fans that will rip you to shreds for not liking the same games as they do. Being a fan of the whole series and all it's continuities will make you a target from all three sides. Even more so if you will insist that they are one and the same continuity.
    • Better don't call Tomb Raider (2013) "the best in the whole franchise". It will irritate fans. But when combined with "the best of all the four games", thus ommiting all the original run by Core Design, well... it's a guaranteed way to get shunned as being too young to be allowed to play any of games in the franchise.
    • Referring to the graphic novels of the franchise as comics. Or insisting that they are nothing more than fanservice.
  • No Mutants Allowed had a reputation for being a minefield of berserk-prone fans. The site has outgrown that and become more evenhanded in reviews and forums, especially since Fall Out New Vegas. It'll still take at least as much time and effort to live down that reputation as it took to establish it in the first place.
  • For all that is holy, do not argue broken/acceptable regarding weapons in Team Fortress 2. Do not argue classes, do not argue prices, do not argue maps, modes, or hats, just do not do it.
    • Yes, the Medic is German. Yes, the Medic is a Deadly Doctor. No, the Medic is not a Nazi. Valve themselves came right out and clearly stated as such, but some fans (likely trolls) still mention it from time to time.
  • Kingdom Hearts fans do not take kindly to it being referred to as a "kids' game".
    • Unless the people you're talking to are into such things, don't even mention shipping, especially the Yaoi kind. You may just cause a Flame War.
    • To say nothing of Organization XIII. Are they Tragic and misunderstood Anti Villains or pure evil? Best not to open that can of worms.
  • While PAYDAY: The Heist did get inspired by the co-op gameplay of Left 4 Dead, calling the game a Left 4 Dead clone/rip-off is a quick way to get fans to laugh at you or blast you for being an ignorant fool if you think the game is Left 4 Dead with cops instead of zombies.
    • Fans will also call you a Call of Duty/Left 4 Dead fantard if you try to suggest a PVP mode for the game, especially since the developers openly stated they won't have a PVP mode.
  • Amongst SNK fans, referring to the unrelated anime and manga series Attack on Titan / Shingeki no Kyojin as "SnK" is a bad idea, especially on Tumblr.
  • Do not mention the original ending to the last game around Mass Effect fans. To put it lightly, it's widely disliked.
  • Negatively comparing Shin Megami Tensei IV to Persona 3 and 4 and especially labeling it as a ripoff of those two games is a bad idea. Although other Megami Tensei games exist, IV seems to have been hit with the Bias Steamroller hard because it was released just shortly after Shin Megami Tensei: Persona entered Cash Cow Franchise territory, causing IV to be pegged as "The Dark Souls of Persona".
  • General Shin Megami Tensei: Don't express that you like Law alignment, or that you think that its representative characters aren't Scrappies.
  • Ridge Racer fans really care whether Reiko Nagase has included, to the point where the games that don't have bombed.
  • A large point of contention for Ratchet & Clank fans is to say that the originals "basically used the same engines" as the Jak and Daxter games, when they really only share specific lines of code in the most central part of the engine.
    • A similar trigger topic would be assuming that Insomniac Games also made Jak and Daxter (a game franchise created by Naughty Dog of Uncharted fame). This misconception was so pervasive that even professional journalists for video game-oriented publications and sites would get this wrong, and it only died when Naughty Dog stopped making Jak games after 2005. Oddly, the idea that Naughty Dog also made Ratchet & Clank was much less pervasive.
  • Do NOT insist that Punch-Out!! for the Wii is a carbon copy of the NES version with updated graphics.
  • If you say the words "World of Warcraft" on Wildstar, then run for your life.

    Visual Novels 
  • Say that visual novels are just video games and aren't unique enough to be considered a different medium. Some fans will just shrug and move on, but most will rip your throat out.
    • However, there are VN fans who resent being categorized as different because it means they're "not real games, so it ends up being a case of Internet Backdraft either way.
  • Don't tell any Key Visual Arts fan that the characters are lolis. Don't even comment that they look like kids — unless the character is specifically pointed out in canon to look young, like Ayu or Kud — and especially don't say that their canon ages are "just a number tacked on so you don't get arrested". In keeping with the aforementioned Artistic Age, all the haremettes are in high school, often late high school, and so are the protagonists. The fans are really tired of hearing it.
  • Expressing squick and revulsion at Katawa Shoujo for featuring a Themed Harem of Disabled Love Interests. No, it's not a Dead Baby Comedy, even if the source material (a set of joke character designs which the game strongly departed from) is, and the thought that it has to be is in itself pretty offensive, considering that viewing disabled people as nonsexual beings and anyone who would be interested in them as predatory is a major problem in society as it is.
  • With the exception of Carnival Phantasm, Fate/Zero and the Kara no Kyoukai movies, never mention any of the Nasuverse anime, especially Shingetsudan Tsukihime.
  • DRAMAtical Murder: Unless you have a death wish, do not bring up the topic of Mink's route and whether or not Aoba was suffering from Stockholm Syndrome. No matter which side of the argument you're on, it won't be pretty. This has lessened since the release of re:connect, which expanded upon Mink's character and motivations, but his route is still very controversial.
    • Another one is the 'you fuck the dog!' joke. Newer fans (and non-fans) will probably laugh, but longtime fans will send death glares your way. Some fans find it especially frustrating because a number of people outside of the fandom have taken the joke seriously and think that the visual novel actually contains bestiality note .
    • Saying something along the lines of "I've been playing this thing for several hours now, where's all the yaoi sex?" will get you worse glares. DRAM Atical Murder is a BL game, but there aren't any explicit scenes until the latter half of the story (near the ending in most routes), so needless to say, they aren't a major part of the game. A lot of people start playing purely to watch the H-scenes, completely ignoring the actual plotline and dumbing down the characters, to the ire of fans.
  • Nine Hours, Nine Persons, Nine Doors fans get pretty annoyed when people call the game the "video game version of Saw", which is a rather bad berserk button to have when this is pretty much what every professional reviewer who reviewed the game said. Hardcore fans however will point out that "999 is much more original then Saw" and that "if you actually pay attention to the game's entire plot, it's actually nothing like Saw". In actual fact, the game was heavily inspired, not by Saw, but by Eastern horror movies, in which the theme is less about sadistic people inducing violence, and more about sadistic inducing fear. The theme of the game, going through a game involving puzzle filled room, has been compared to Saw, but as fans are quick to the point out, the actual puzzles and entire set up for why the exist in the first place is nothing like it. The same goes for it's sequel, Virtue's Last Reward.
    • Also, please don't say in front of 999/VLR that you find the plot incredibly unrealistic and therefore bad. You'll get a huge speech about how everything is actually given an actual real life scientific/theoretical well explained explanation and that if you think the plot's unrealistic it means you mustn't have paid any attention to these parts. Not to mention, that saying you find tthe plot "poorly put together" or that the writers "didn't care" is a BAD no-no, since fans will be quick to point out that everything slots together so well, and folds so neatly into place that writing such a complex plot would take amazing levels of care and attention to detail.
  • Dumbing down Higurashi: When They Cry by describing it as the "killer lolis" series is a thorn in the side of many fans. Talking about how you only like the gorn and horror aspects, ignoring the tragedy behind it all, is even worse.

    Web Comics 
  • In The Order of the Stick, Big Bad Xykon has to deal not just with random members of the community, but even characters in the comic spelling his name wrong (with a Z). He can even tell when you misspell it in a speech balloon. And he will kill you for it.
    • Not a name-related issue, but speculating on the comic's frequent Schedule Slip on the fora is grounds for having your post locked and receiving an infraction.
  • On the fora of Looking for Group, anyone ignorant enough to post anything even hinting that they think the comic is a World of Warcraft story happening in Azeroth will get beaten up, crucified, eaten and shot, in that order. Despite the fact that the comic started as a Warcraft parody (though only for a very brief period) and incredibly obviously took significant inspiration from the games.
  • Gunnerkrigg Court: The third girl from the photo is not Jones, and she is not related to Gamma in any way. Fans continued to speculate to the contrary, even though Tom jossed those theories, within hours of their first proposal, then put a note to that effect below the comic. At one point, a forum regular who should have known better suggested that this speculation should be a ban-worthy offense. This specific line of Wild Mass Guessing seems to have stopped now that it's been unambiguously confirmed in-comic that the photo girl and Jones are different people.
  • Dreamkeepers fans are usually pretty torn when it comes to pronouncing Namah's name. Some people say NAA-MUH, while others believe it to be NAY-MUH and refuse to back down in their opinions.
  • Las Lindas author Soul Kat has a big Berserk Button related to this trope due to so many people screwing up Davin Preacher's name, instead calling him Devin.
  • Loldwell.com features a number of comic strips themed around different iterations of the concept: 1, 2, 3, 4
  • Try telling your Homestuck friend that you skipped the intermission because it was boring and pointless. Go on. Try it. (Hint: it becomes very important later on.)

    Web Original 
  • Don't speculate on the Homestar Runner wiki. Don't forget to sign your posts. And for your own sake, if you don't want a month long banning, NEVER mention their Schedule Slip.
  • Do not talk about Mallard Fillmore at The Comics Curmudgeon. As in, you'll be banned for it because it only ever causes arguments.
  • At TFWiki.net the quickest and easiest way to prevent anyone from caring about your opinion is to object to the use of humorous image captions.
  • Being mistaken about the origin of the Slender Man. No, it was not originally a Creepypasta, although many Creepypastas involving him have been written since his creation. No, Marble Hornets did not create him,note  and neither did Slender. The Slender Man was created in Something Awful forum thread.
    • There is a very real possibility of Marble Hornets fans hunting you down to bash you over the head with a lump of concrete if you say anything along the lines of "I love Masky, he's my favorite creepypasta!" Masky is not from a creepypasta, his identity is no longer mysterious, and you will be laughed at if you think it is. Ditto referring to proxies anywhere in the mythos as "Maskies" or thinking that fellow Marble Hornets character Hoody is from a 'pasta either.
    • For that matter, calling Hoody or Masky "proxies" will get you treated to a nice lengthy explanation of how the term wasn't used in Marble Hornets and neither should be considered as such. Your best bet is to only use the term "proxy" when talking about Everyman HYBRID (Be sure to spell it right or you will get flamed for this, too.) or Tribe Twelve.
  • Some YouTube rhythm gaming videos use music that is coincidentally available in the AudioSwap gallery. Just try and mention AudioSwap in the comments.
  • If you join the SCP Foundation, do yourself a favor and peruse the site (which, admittedly, is very large) for a while before putting up new SCP entries; while certain community standards are arguably too high or too picky, anything that's flagrantly awful just as a piece of "creative writing", nevermind the tone of the site, will typically get long, line-by-line breakdowns of everything you did wrong. Repeat offenses (or shotgunning multiple horrid entries at once) may or may not get you kicked off the site, depending on your personal attitude. For really entertaining discussions, however, just try to say how SCP-173 is a rip-off of the Weeping Angels, or why your impossibly amazing self-insert humanoid SCP/Researcher deserves to be all over the site, or how this new thing would really actually easily be able to kill SCP-682. Enjoy your time as a D-class.
    • Also, don't call it "SPC". That stands for "Shark-Punching Center".
    • Don't mention Dr. Bright around SCP fans on livejournal, insanejournal, or dreamwidth - reactions will range from white hot rage to tired resignation about what his writer did to get so many people angry.
  • One of the variants of "Rule #1 of Tumblr"—as if taking a page from Fight Club—is to never mention Tumblr outside of Tumblr itself. Though, Tumblr is largely well-known at this point, making this "rule" a Discredited Meme.
    • Also, tread very carefully when tagging your posts—people tracking those tags will probably get on your case if you say bad things about the subjects of the tags. This can catch some users off-guard as some use tags as blog organization and may not be aware that what they're doing is stirring up an Internet Backdraft. (A way to avoid this is to stuff the first five tags with nonsense tags then put the relevant tags after those; if a particular tag is the 6th or higher tag on a post, the post will not appear when searching for that tag.)
  • Fans of Demo Reel do not like to be reminded of The Review Must Go On and by extension, the post-uncancellation Nostalgia Critic videos.
  • Asking "what if Operation Sealion had been successful" or even mentioning the "Unmentionable Sea Mammal" in a non-ironic way on AlternateHistory.com is sure to end in much banging of heads against walls in frustration at the prospect of having to explain to yet another noob just why it could not, under any circumstances, have worked.

    Western Animation 
  • In the Live-Action Adaptation of Avatar: The Last Airbender , M. Night Shyamalan changed the pronounciations of some of the characters, most notably the main character, from their Americanized pronounciations in the cartoon to their more "correct" pronounciations based on their spelling and eastern origins. Predictably, this caused considerable backlash among fans of the show ranging from purist "Trukk Not Munky"-esque Fan Dumb to more casual viewers who simply found it strange listening to the eponymous Last Airbender's name being pronounced "Ah-ng" rather than like the first syllable of "angry" to people who find it curious that Shyamalan would put so much emphasis on cultural accuracy in the script, but not the casting..
    • Also, don't call the original show an anime. It's a common mistake, since the show is clearly anime-inspired, but some people will get very mad at you for it (not least of all because of its "Nicktoon" label).
      • And that A:TLA was animated entirely in South Korea, not Japan. (Granted, many actual anime are also animated mostly in Korea, but that's beside the point; most American cartoons are as well.)
  • In the Hey Arnold! fandom, don't you dare ship Arnold/Lila. He's supposed to be with Helga. Don't you understand that?!
    • Neglecting Helga or calling her ugly is one of the most excessive ways to rile up the fans.
  • Looney Tunes fans hate it when someone spells it "Looney TOONS". Unfortunately for them, people at Warner Bros. actually use that spelling too.
  • In-universe example for Superman: The Animated Series: When Superman mispronounces the name of Mr. Mxyzptlk (Mix-Yes-Spit-Lick) as Mr. Miz-Ill-Plick, said Reality Warper promptly corrects him on it. This was done as a Take That to how his name was mispronounced in the later Super Friends cartoons.
  • The aftermath of asking most fans what Robin's real name is in Teen Titans will definitely not be pretty.
  • Saying positive things about certain post-movie episodes of Sponge Bob Square Pants and the characters after undergoing massive Flanderization will get you a boot up the ass in some circles.
  • My Little Pony:
    • Confusing characters for each other, particularly cross-generation. Confusing Glory (Gen. 1) for Rarity (Gen. 4) is a bad idea, and believing Glory was the inspiration for Rarity is just as bad of an offense (she's based off Sparkler, though it's acknowledged that Rarity's colour scheme is nearly identical to Glory's).
      • It's accidental as Rarity is blue like Sparkler. She's a very toned down blue, to the point where she looks white to the naked eye.
    • My Little Pony Tales is not Generation 2, it's just a second Generation 1 cartoon. Generation 2 did not have a cartoon; it did have a game and some European comics though.
    • Confusing the fans themselves with each other. Prior to the premier of Friendship Is Magic in late 2010, the MLP fandom was made up almost entirely of women who grew up with the show and toys in the 80's. These fans were mostly neutral on the new show and did not take well to the sudden influx of younger, mostly male, fans; it didn't help that most "bronies" wanted nothing to do with the original shows/toys or its fanbase. To this day, the two fandoms rarely talk to each other. Don't assume they do.
    • Bronies have very little tolerance for calling Princess Celestia a "Tyrant" or "Molestia" in any serious capacity; especially when a brony says this to her voice actress. That word "serious" is the key one; most fans consider it harmless fun, especially when done with explicit comedic intent. That does not, as shown above, extend to mentioning that fanon to the original VA. Or any fanon to anyone involved with the show.
      • This is because people involved in a production are not allowed to read, view, or play any fan-made material, and to know as little about it as possible, due to potential plagiarism lawsuits. If they produce something similar to fanwork, they can avoid legal trouble by claiming to not have heard of the fanwork in question. Forcing fanon onto someone involved with a TV show could potentially set them up for such an unwinnable lawsuit and ruin them.
    • Just bringing up the fiasco surrounding the appearance of Derpy Hooves in "The Last Roundup" is known to do this.
    • Just try calling a Brony a Furry instead, or claim they're into bestiality, or bring up the infamous Lyra Plushie, or just show them this old gem. You'll hear insults you never thought existed, and be lucky to escape with your life.
      • On a similar note, calling a Brony a Man Child or showing any reference to Bronies by old media, which for the most part is extremely biased against them, will cause fans to seethe with rage.
    • For even more fun, try making an OC with Pony Creator and upload it to an MLP image board and brace yourself for an onslaught of mockery and insults. It's really telling that the gal who made the thing had to disable comments on the page to quell the verbal slaughter she was taking.
      • Chili's Grill made one with complete seriousness in an event that became legendary amongst the Bronies. They've long since deleted the tweet for very obvious reasons, but here's a pic for your Troping pleasure. Take a look at the comments to see the kind of flak they took for that one.
    • Equestria Girls. Just stating an opinion on it amongst the bronies will drop you into the middle of a flame war.
    • Mention the Down With Molestia movement anywhere that the bronies hang out and you will very quickly find yourself in the middle of a war zone. The Ask Princess Molestia article explicitly asks people to simply not mention it, and take a wild guess what the article's only discussion topic is about.
    • There's nothing like a little old Canon vs Fanon to set off the fans of a show with as devoted of fans as MLP. Some is taken in good stride like the origins of Applejack's hat note , while others like discussing whether a certain wall-eyed pony is related to a certain unicorn filly will set bronies off like fireworks as seen here.
  • Family Guy fans hate it when people and the media call it The Family Guy. This debacle was referenced in "Bobba-Dee Babba-Dee".
  • There was a small incident in the Transformers Prime fandom, right after episode 21 aired, when someone who shall remain nameless for their own safety perpetuated a rumor via Wikipedia that episode 22 would be named something along the lines of "one bot, two bots, red bots, bluebots" or some such thing like that, and somehow several people fell for it. It was even uploaded onto YouTube with that name, but ended up being completely wrong.
  • This attitude is mercilessly mocked in Animaniacs with an ad for the Please Please Please Get A Life Foundation. In fact, the Straw Fan at the beginning and end of the segment says things reminiscent of most of the examples on this page.
    • And the writers have said that most of the comments in that clip were taken from actual fans.
  • Ed, Edd n Eddy: Be careful defending the other kids over the Eds. Things will get heated fast.
    • Talking about what Edd's hair looks like and what's the secret under his hat is quite an issue.
  • Time Squad: Just try to talk about Otto's backstory, try to put in your own opinion about what happened to him before Time Squad, it will always turn into heated arguments.
  • For fans of old Cartoon Network, it's okay to mention the words "Stuart Snyder"... that is, if you want to die.
  • Chuckie's dad from Rugrats is "Chas" not "Chaz".
  • It is generally not a good idea to call American Dad! a Family Guy clone, especially as the show has found its own footing and voice.
  • Referring to Thomas the Tank Engine as "Thomas the Train", "Thomas the Tank", or especially "Thomas the Choo Choo Train" will guarantee you a kick in the rear from the fanbase.
  • Due to complaints from parents, the Winx Club fandom will lose their minds if you dare to call the characters anorexic. To be fair, this is justified because while the characters are skinnier than is possible, the show regularly depicts them eating. In fact, the beauty-obsessed one of the main group has been shown eating a bit more than the others and has scarfed down plates of food before! And of course, like many animated shows, it's simply an effect of the art style rather than deliberately trying to have them be super thin.

     Other 
  • Lolicon. Bring it up around members of the Lolita Fashion subculture, and hope to escape alive and unscathed.
  • Saying or implying that a roller coaster is dangerous will earn you a rebuke from any coaster enthusiast who happens to hear you. Yes, your car really is 10,000 times more dangerous than the coaster.
  • Referring to science fiction not as "SF" but as Sci-Fi will brand you as a complete mundane. Someone who would be lost at a con, probably looks down his nose at zines, and wouldn't know real fanac if he fell over it. (Or at the very least, pronounce it "skiffy").
    • Though admittedly the above is mostly restricted to the purist of the pure.
    • At the 1977 Worldcon, Gary Kurtz said "We hope that [Star Wars] will lead to many more sci-fi films...." Two thousand fans went "BOOOOOOO!", as Robert Silverberg gently explained "You aren't supposed to say that."
    • Much worse would be considering franchises like Star Trek or Star Wars as "hard" Sci-Fi, when in reality they're the softest of the soft, and Sci-Fi/SF fans will let you have it with both barrels for it. Let alone actually EQUATING SF fandom with "Star Trek" fandom or "Star Wars" fandom. It happens.
  • If you are visiting Victoria, the capital of the province of British Columbia, you are on Vancouver Island, not "Victoria Island". The city of Vancouver is not located on this island (they are just named for the same guy). Mildly confusing to an outsider, but not actually any harder than, say, Kansas City being in Missouri. Yet this frequent tourist error has become the bane of many a BC tourism worker.
    • While you're on the island, swing by Mount Washington and ask if it was named after a certain U.S. president. It's an honest mistake, but in reality it was named after Rear Admiral John Washington and you'd better believe you'll be corrected.
    • Some folks in B.C. are also rather sensitive about the renaming of the Queen Charlotte Islands to "Haida Gwaii" in 2010. Just mention an opinion on it (for or against the name change; it really doesn't matter), and brace for an argument.
  • When speaking or writing English using pretentious plurals can bring you a lot of grief. Viruses being pluralized to viri, for instance, is incorrect as "virus" is of neuter, not masculine, gender and moreover, viruses is commonly acknowledged as the correct plural. Because most words in English, whether borrowed or not, have a simple plural case of -s, even you are using the technically correct plural (by the grammar of the root language); like Forum/Fora, Octopus/Octopodes, Cherub/Cherubim you risk sounding deliberately obtuse or desperate to show you have a education. Either way you can expect someone to be annoyed.
  • Practitioners of Middle Eastern dance forms vary in their reaction to the appellation "belly dance". Some will jump down your throat over the "misnomer". (Just quoting, Rocky!) Others have given up trying, or value the recognition factor more. See the Dead Horse Derby.
    • What will really bring down wrath from all, without exception, is implying that their art form is to be identified with, similar to, derived from or in any way connected with stripping. Just don't, on pain of pain. "Exotic dance" is best avoided for that reason.
  • Followers of Leon Trotsky react badly to being called "Trotskyites". It's "TrotskyISTS".
  • Mention that sharing art (e.g. from Pixiv) without permission is okay, and you'll get a huge mouthful from the artist community for disrespecting copyright. Mention that it's not okay, and you'll incur the wrath of those who feel that artists are way too sensitive about how their art is promoted.
  • Aficionados of the pre-1980 Volkswagen Type 2 do not take kindly to it being called a "van." It's the Bus, thankyouverymuch.
  • Try calling the Willis Tower by that name around Chicagoans. It is still the Sears Tower, thank you.
  • Something really fun to do, if you're wearing a helmet and a sports cup, is to tell someone who just got a piercing or tattoo or some such body modification, "Oh, but you looked so pretty/handsome."
  • It's Or-uh-gun, nor Ory-gone. It's the Will-AM-ette River, not the WILL-am-ette River. Not every Oregonian is from Portland, and Portland is not, not, not Seattle. Also, be careful when mentioning Portlandia— some Portlanders may love it, some may hate it, and some may feel it falls under N-Word Privileges.


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alternative title(s): Bannondorf; Gannon Banned; Nerd Rage; Pedantic Fan Rage
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