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Fake Mark
aka: Conman In Marks Clothing
This term refers to both a role in a con and a tale that uses the role. Goes like this: The Fake Mark pretends he is a big juicy target, someone easy to hate, someone who needs to be 'taken down.' The true conman brings this juicy target to the attention of a third party (the actual mark).

The idea is to get the real mark to chip in some funds in order to take down the fake mark, then take off with those funds. Frequently, the true mark of this tale is another conman, a juicy target being something a conman finds hard to pass by. See also The Shill, which also involves pretending not to be part of the con.


Examples

    open/close all folders 

    Film 
  • In the movie The Sting, Paul Newman's character Gondorff plays a fake mark when he is working as the obnoxious bookie "Shaw".
  • House Of Games involves a fake mark (cop) to trap the female protagonist.

    Literature 
  • In Fingersmith Sue thinks she's conning Maud but Maud is actually conning her.
  • Discworld's Moist von Lipwig was fond of this one, preferring to scam those with plenty of greed and little scruples by using their greed against them.
    There is a saying "You can't fool an honest man" which is much quoted by people who make a profitable living by fooling honest men. Moist never knowingly tried it, anyway. If you did fool an honest man, he tended to complain to the local Watch, and these days they were harder to buy off. Fooling dishonest men was a lot safer and, somehow, more sporting.

    Live Action TV 
  • On Hustle, this is usually either Danny or Albert.
  • In Only Fools and Horses, the episode "Cash and Curry" reveals that the two rival Indian businessmen that Del had been attempting to con, were actually conmen themselves.
  • On Leverage, Nate usually handles this role combined with his usual style.

    Western Animation 
  • King of the Hill: in one episode, Peggy is conned into getting a degree from a diploma mill. When she discovers that a large number of people who clearly are not mental giants also bought degrees, she realizes it's a scam and sets up a The Sting-type counter-scam to get their money back. Subverted in that the con man is Genre Savvy and stops betting just before placing the last bet, so he keeps the money from his original diploma mill con plus the bait money he was winning in the leadup bets to convince him that it really was a sure thing. It's then played straight with Peggy herself as the False Mark, because it turns out she'd planned for him to stop betting at that point all along; when Hank shows up to challenge the con man about the money, he stows it in his room safe, and Boomhauer sneaks it out through the false back of the safe from the room next door.


The Con Within A ConThe ConThe Mark
Con Men Hate GunsCon ManThe Fixer

alternative title(s): Conman In Marks Clothing
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