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Every Body Lives
"Everybody lives, Rose! Just this once, everybody lives!"

Some shows naturally have a bodycount in virtually every episode (if only the Monster of the Week). Sometimes, however, no-one dies at all.

This is more satisfying than a random episode of a show where nobody ever dies; it shows that, even in a world that's gray with complexities and cynicism, sometimes you really can Earn Your Happy Ending. Although it can also come off as very cheap and maybe with a Deus ex Machina thrown in, especially if it's over the whole series.

Frequently doubles as a Heartwarming Moments.

In a game where you have units that can be killed, achieving this trope is known as a No Casualties Run.

Contrast Everybody's Dead, Dave, Kill 'em All, and Nobody Can Die. Not to be confused with Nobody Dies (a NGE fanfic).

This is an Ending trope, so beware of spoilers.

Examples

    open/close all folders 

    Anime and Manga 
  • One Piece had this going for a while, like when a character appears to have died turns out to be ok by the end of the arc, and only in flashbacks have characters died, which makes Ace and Whitebeard's deaths all the more jarring
  • In Detective Conan, it is a rare day indeed when the eponymous hero can go somewhere without someone dying in a convoluted manner, but it is a good day indeed. Note that these are usually instances where KID is actually attempting to steal something. There were also a couple of stories where Conan was able to prevent the murder before it happened, and a couple where there was no murder or crime, just a hilarious misunderstanding.
  • The TV series of Vampire Princess Miyu was a particularly bloody Dark Magical Girl show. There was only one episode which had a happy (and Les Yay) ending and in which nobody died (unless you count evil dolls). However the show seemed to feel the need to compensate for this by killing off an entire village in the next episode.
  • Mai-HiME: At the end EVERYBODY that died comes back to life, with the exception of the defeated Big Bad the Obsidian Lord and possibly Father Joseph.
    • The same applies to the manga, but without the resurrections
  • The second-to-last episode of Library War ended with two major characters potentially dead: one being shot multiple times in the chest, and another getting caught in a large explosion. However, in the last episode, they both make a full recovery.
  • One arc in Higurashi: When They Cry ends in this matter.
    • Played completely straight in the final arc of Kai.
  • In Naruto, it looked like the "Pain Invasion Arc" was turning the series into an Anyone Can Die, but the arc ends up becoming this trope.
    • Earlier we had the Sasuke retrieval arc, where it looked liked Neji and Chouji died, complete with depressingly sad send offs and stills of their motionless bodies. They both live, Neji through force and will, and Chouji because he was fat enough that his red pill had more energy to burn than what would have killed him otherwise.
  • Franken Fran throws in a few of these to mix things up. There's slightly fewer if you don't count chapters where technically no-one dies, but someone ends up going insane or suffering a Fate Worse than Death... and in Chapter 21, Everybody Lives is the Downer Twist Ending, as a character the reader neither wanted nor expected to make it through the chapter without dying or suffering a Fate Worse than Death gets off scot-free.
  • Total confirmed Mahou Sensei Negima! casualties by the end... zero. No dead bad guys, good guys, mooks or civilians. Not even the village that was turned to stone in the backstory. Practically the only character confirmed to be dead currently is Gateau Kagura Vanderburg, Takahata's former teacher. In fact, with the exception of Chigusa, all of the villains go out of their way to avoid civilian casualties. The only deaths are when Asuna wakes up in the future and the entire classnote  is dead. To be fair, this takes place 130 years in the future and with the exception of Negi, they all died of old age.
  • Despite the huge body count in RahXephon, everyone lives in the end after Ayato uses the completed RahXephon system to recreate the world.
  • The Karin anime ends by killing off Karin's entire family... and then bringing them back to life. A case of Adaptation Distillation, as the manga is far more bittersweet.
  • In the last episode of Serial Experiments Lain everybody who had died in the series are alive in the new reality created by Lain, where she doesn't exist.
  • The original Steel Angel Kurumi does this: as the last episode goes on, all the Steel Angels had given up their power to power a cannon to destroy the One-Winged Angel form of Kurumi, only for Nakahito to start bringing her back... when the cannon's fired, apparently killing them both. In their "afterlife", the two come to, share a True Love's Kiss, reviving them and all the Steel Angels.
  • The best case scenario The Kindaichi Case Files can get is when Hajime has to solve a botched murder only to find out that it was a misunderstanding, the victim got better and all is forgiven.
  • Puella Magi Madoka Magica The Movie: Rebellion is an example where it's actually portrayed as a bad thing, or at the very least morally ambiguous. Mostly because it's accomplished by a character becoming the devil.
  • Gundam Build Fighters: On one hand, one wouldn't expect a show about model robots battling to have character deaths. On the other hand, it's still Gundam...
    • ...so they play with it by having battles and moments that tend to ape typical character-death moments, such as the Big Brother/Mentor type getting trashed in battle, or the hero having to face his artificially-enhanced girlfriend forced to fight against her will, or a love interest sacrificing herself to protect the hero from an attack. But since it's all plastic models, nothing is ever at stake other than the costs of a few model kits and a couple days building time.
  • Due to how battles in Kill la Kill revolve around tearing off the opponent's superpowered uniform, named casualties are extremely rare. So rare, in fact, that the only two characters who die are the Big Bad and her Dragon; every other named character alive at the beginning of the series is alive at the very end as well.
  • Much to the surprise and relief of its fans, this ends up being the case in Akuma No Riddle. Everyone, even Chitaru and Hitsugi, is shown to be alive and well in the final episode.

    Comicbooks 
  • Most of Batman's encounters with The Riddler tend to be like this. In comparison to his more homicidal comrades in Batman's Rogues Gallery, the cerebral nature of the Riddler's modus operandi was less likely to involve murder.
    • Depends on the writer. Sometimes he's as much a homicidal maniac as everyone else.
  • Dan Slott's Spider-Man has recently declared that no one will die on his watch. Victims, villains, it doesn't matter. No one dies.

    Fan Works 
  • Game Theory, surprisingly enough, given its tone. Out of the cast of name characters, everyone makes it through the story, including some who didn't survive in canon. In fact, it actually has a negative body count, because someone gets brought back to life.
  • Touhou Ibunshu, despite being a Dark Fic, plays this straight for the first three arcs; although there are deaths no-one stays dead, and they'll all fine by the end. The fourth and final arc has the sole aversion, with the death of Fujiwara no Mokou.

    Films — Animated 

    Films — Live-Action 
  • In Dresden the main character (a British pilot), his love interest, their Jewish friend and HIS love interest, the main love interest's dad, and the love rival, ALL manage to survive the bombing of Dresden - even though some of them were in the train station that was the first place to get hit, and which was supposed to be absolutely obliterated. And the protagonist does this all with serious injuries. And he escapes back to England. However, this is subverted later when after the war, Protagonist flies back to see his true love (and, OMG, their child)... when his plane crashes. So, he is killed... in the post-script... by a voice-over.
  • Lampshaded in Kiss Kiss Bang Bang - "Look, I hate it too. In movies where the studio gets all paranoid about a downer ending so the guy shows up, he's magically alive on crutches, I hate that. I mean shit, why not bring them all back?"
  • No one in Spy Kids (not even the bad guys) die. It's a family movie, after all.
  • Nobody dies in the first National Treasure film except for one mook who falls off an elevated platform. This is particularly notable considering how action-packed the movie is otherwise. This partly stems from the fact that the villain is a Well-Intentioned Extremist who only resorts to violence when other measures fail.
  • The Western spoof The Hallelujah Trail deserves some notice for lampshading its zero casualty rate, since the climax of the movie is a many-cornered shootout between the US cavalry escort of a a whiskey shipment, an armed Temperance Union wagon train, some very un-PC Native Americans and a band of thirsty hard-rock miners; the cavalry commander (Burt Lancaster) exclaimed in the battle's aftermath, "Never have so many bullets been fired by so many people in so small an area AND NOT HIT ANYBODY!" To be fair, there was a dust storm at the time, and one laggardly brave appeared to have been shot in the butt. Twice. Which gives an ironic tone to a tragedy on the set when a stuntman died during the production.
  • Nobody stays dead in Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time, due to a Reset Button ending. Of course, this avoids being an Ass Pull due to time travel being a central plot point.
    • Well, after the reset Nizam still dies, of course. Disney movies rarely let villains live.
  • Similarily, no one stays dead in the Back to the Future films. Well, it's possible those Libyan terrorists didn't survive the van crash, so they might have died, but they could have only been injured just as easily. If Deleted Scenes count, Marshall Strickland was murdered by Buford Tannen, though the scene was cut explicitly because of this trope.
  • In Tim Burton's version of Alice in Wonderland, despite having a epic battle at the end, nobody dies. Well, only The Jabberwocky.
  • In Magical Legend of the Leprechauns...let's say that the ending is a complete reversal of the source material, Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet.
  • No one dies in Inception unless you count the protagonist's wife, who was dead before the story began and Nash who gets Rewarded as a Traitor Deserves offscreen. Although the Mind Screw nature of the film allows interpretations all along this line.
  • No one dies in Inside Man. This is especially notable because the bank robbers are spending the entire movie making sure no one dies and that everyone thinks the hostages are in danger. This is a central part of the robbers plan since if Everybody Lives and nothing seems to be stolen from the bank, the police are unlikely to expand significant resources pursuing them in the aftermath.
  • The film The Old Dark House (1932) is a rare Horror Film where Everybody Lives.
  • Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home is the only Star Trek film in which no one dies, not even a Red Shirt. This was a conscious decision on Leonard Nimoy's part, as he wanted the film to be Lighter and Softer after Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan and Star Trek III: The Search for Spock. In fact, in Nimoy's own words, "nobody is hurt in Star Trek IV as a result of hostility." Note that when Chekov is injured escaping from the naval base, it's because he falls over a ledge and not because anyone shot at him. (If you want to get really technical, however, Gillian did slap that guy.)
    • The fate of the Federation starship disabled by the Whale Probe at the beginning of the film is ambiguous, however. The vessel is drained of all power and left drifting in space, far from any hope of rescue, as the Federation has a much greater problem to deal with at that point in time. The novelization does mention that the captain of that ship was able to save the ship and her crew (including herself).
  • Poltergeist is a relatively rare horror film in which nobody dies.
    • Of course there are some already dead bodies and souls without whom this movie wouldn't have worked...
  • The Entity is another horror movie with no deaths... but in a way, this actually makes it SCARIER. Instead of being about an evil force trying to kill someone, it's an evil force relentlessly and endlessly tormenting them. At the end of the movie, no one is dead but the entity hasn't been defeated either. We get one last tense suspenseful scene making it clear that this thing will continue to torment our main character - and in case that wasn't already obvious enough, there are even captions on the end mentioning the events are "still occurring today".
  • The Amityville Horror, both the 2005 remake (well, the dog dies) and the 1979 original, save for the flashbacks to the murders before the main story. Somewhat forced in that they're based on an allegedly true story which everyone involved survived.
  • Conversed in Throw Mama From The Train when Owen writes a children's book very loosely based on the preceding events. "Nobody gets killed in this book". Nobody gets killed in the film either, although it's initially made to seem otherwise.
  • Close Encounters of the Third Kind is a rare example of a science fiction blockbuster that doesn't involve any of the characters dying.
  • In the Good Future of X-Men: Days of Future Past, everyone seen to die in the Bad Future is saved, and indeed, so too are a great many characters killed off in previous films. Several supporting characters from First Class remain dead, but since that happened between movies it's not material. Every single named character in the story of this film is saved in the end (even the bad guys).

    Literature 
  • Terry Pratchett, while writing Good Omens, insisted that nobody would die as a result of Adam the Antichrist's existence, to the point of persuading the co-author Neil Gaiman to reverse the deaths of several innocent telephone salespeople at the mandibles of an enraged demon.
  • Death is a character virtually guaranteed an appearance in every LiteratureDiscworld book (only absent from two books in a series with dozens of entries), so it shouldn't come as a surprise that at least one person dies in each book. The two times nobody bites it in the course of the story (of which only one of the above-mentioned books is, interestingly enough) therefore come as a bit of a surprise. Of course, in one of those cases, the guy who didn't die probably wished he had.
  • Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban is the only J. K. Rowling book in which no human or animal is killed; Pettigrew escaping any possible death sentence and then Harry and Hermione going back in time to save Buckbeak (scheduled to be executed) and Sirius (scheduled to have his soul ripped out of his body). If you only count human deaths, everyone lives in Chamber of Secrets too since only the basilisk died.
  • In the Doctor Who New Adventures Sleepy by Kate Orman, the Doctor vows early on that this time everybody lives: "villains, innocents, everyone." And he seems to have succeeded ... until he remembers that one person was killed in an accidental fire, when he was somewhere else.
  • The Christopher Buckley political satire The White House Mess inverts this trope. In an Alternate History where the Democrats win the White House in 1988, president John Tucker handles a terrorist insurrection in Bermuda, without killing a single person, by spraying a gas that makes the entire island fall asleep. The media, even in the United States, characterize him as a monster. Later on, when people actually die in a conventional commando raid, Tucker is devastated, but no one else cares.
  • King's Ransom is the only book out of 55 87th Precinct novels in which no one dies.

    Live Action TV 
  • Doctor Who has a number of examples, despite its (deserved) reputation for high body counts.
    • The Trope Namer is "The Doctor Dances", which ends with the above quote as the kid who got hit by a bomb and all the other gas-mask zombies get better, extra points that a random old lady even had her amputated leg restored.
    • While there is a body count in Moffat's "Silence in the Library"/"Forest of the Dead", everyone killed during the two-parter is revealed to be living in a virtual world in the Library's computer. Even Donna's nonexistent children from when she was "saved." River even uses this trope by name in her closing narration.
      River: Now and then, every once in a very long while, every day in a million days, when the wind stands fair and the Doctor comes to call... everybody lives.
    • Moffat has ascended to achieving a whole new level of Everybody Lives in "The Big Bang", seeing as everyone who had previously been erased from existence, including Amy's parents, Rory, The Doctor, and, well, the ENTIRETY OF REALITY comes out of it alive.
    • Others include "Edge of Destruction" (by virtue of having no guest stars), "The Celestial Toymaker", "The Savages", "Fury from the Deep", "The Mind Robber", "Castrovalva" (well, nobody real dies), "Four to Doomsday", "Snakedance", "Night Terrors", and "Hide".
    • Perhaps paradoxically (given the name), "Terminus". At least, there are no on-screen deaths.
    • An interesting case occurred with "The Curse of the Black Spot", in which the Doctor, Amy, and Rory land on a pirate ship stuck in the ocean with a crew that's being picked off one by one by a siren, who marks crew members with "the black spot" on their hand. It turns out that the seemingly evil siren was actually a computer-created doctor from a crashed spaceship which had been taking men who were hurt, even though they did not have serious injuries. All the crew are in fact perfectly fine, and she was just trying to help.
    • The 2011 Christmas special "The Doctor, the Widow and the Wardrobe" also pulled one of these, with bonus points for the father and at least two crew of his bomber that turned out to be not so much "lost and presumed dead," as "took a detour through the Vortex."
  • Mendol Ikemen has not one, but two faked deaths. The first is from the idols stabbing themselves with fake knives, and the second is the girls being shot with blanks.
  • Being monster hunters, the boys from Supernatural don't usually find out about a hunt unless someone has died already. But in one episode, "Home", the brothers go to the site before anyone dies, since Sam had a vision, making it the first Everybody Lives episode. A guy does get his arm ground up in a garbage disposal, though.
    • No humans die neither in season 4 episode "Wishful Thinking". The only thing that "dies" is a teddy bear magically brought to life when the curse is reverted. "The Monster At The End of The Book" in the same season is another example: the plot start when the Winchesters finds book about them in a store.
  • Life On Mars has the one with Reg Cole taking people hostage and threatening to kill someone at 2:00. As Sam says, "Nobody dies today."
  • The Unit with "Natural Selection." Mind you, much of said episode is a Flash Back to Bob Brown's selection process and the plot involves no combat at all.
  • Murder, She Wrote had a Christmas episode in which the intended victim survived.
    • There was also the episode with the All Just a Dream ending, so after Jess returns to reality we see the "murder victim" alive and well.
  • Be very wary when Law & Order does this - if the Victim of the Week is still standing at the start of the trial segment, as a rule, the assailant will plead out and he'll be the one on trial for whatever made people try to kill him.
    • Although the Season 16 episode "Red Ball" is a very, very rare straight example. A little girl is kidnapped, the cops catch the guy who did it but he won't tell them where the girl is (or even if she's still alive). He ends up trying to game to system, saying he'll only tell the police and prosecutors where the girl is if he's given a free pass with no prison time whatsoever - after much arguing and agonizing, Jack McCoy defies his superiors and grants the kidnapper the deal, more or less guaranteeing he'll be fired. The girl is found safe and well, the Judge presiding over the case overrules the deal McCoy gave the kidnappers and sentences him to a fair bit of prison time, and as the final kicker, Arthur Branch doesn't even fire Jack. Everybody wins (except the bad guy of course).
    • Another rare straight example is the Series Finale. The detectives come across a website of someone boasting they're going to shoot up and blow up a school while showing off enough ammo and explosives to make their threat credible. The scramble is to try to find the perp before he can carry out his boast. In the end, a school shooting does occur, but the shooter is overpowered before he can kill anybody. Also, at her retirement party, Van Buren learns that her cancer tests have come back negative, and happily introduces everybody to her fiancee.
  • Kamen Rider Ryuki, whose main premise was There Can Be Only One, ends with Len/Knight as the last remaining Rider after everyone else has been killed off. However, the master of the Rider War isn't too happy with this outcome (since his proxy Odin wasn't the winner) and attempts to start things over by rewinding time. However, Yui finally convinces him that no matter how many times the Rider War is run, she will never accept a new life from him if it's at the cost of thirteen others. So this time when he rewinds everything, he stays in the Mirror World with Yui and never starts the Rider War in the first place. Thus, Everybody Lives. Bravo, Yasuko Kobayashi.
    • Save Scissors, who is still very much dead. He was a corrupt bastard so we will let it slide
  • Surprisingly, even CSI: Crime Scene Investigation has done one of these - in "You Kill Me," all the murders took place in the Lab Rats' (and Grissom's) imaginations.
  • Buffy the Vampire Slayer: Unless you count the vampire who died off-screen and was turned, there are no deaths in "The Body." Kind of ironic, considering the subject of the episode.
    • A notable Buffy episode for this would be 6x22, "Grave"; it is the ONLY season finale Big Bad battle where mass deaths do not ensue. Despite Willow's superpowered evil rampage to finish off the Trio, which culminated with Buffy and Dawn trapped underground fighting earth elementals, Giles slowly dying, and Xander standing in front of a supremely tweaked-off Dark Willow zapping him with dark magic as she tries to blow up the world, everyone (including the generic Sunnydale redshirts) makes it out alive.
  • In the Volume 5: Redemption season finale of Heroes, the Heroes manage to stop Samuel's plot to destroy New York City without causing or allowing a single death. Thanks to Big Bad Samuel's many Kick the Dog moments throughout the season, his right-hand men and other followers are all convinced to turn against him without a fight, rendering the previously all-powerful Big Bad into a powerless sap to be dragged off by the cops. Meanwhile, Sylar stay true to his redemption and incapacitates Doyle without killing him in order to save Emma. This is pretty noteworthy considering the show's tendency to purge all its secondary characters at the end of each Volume, typically with a massive Sylar-centric bloodbath.
  • On Cold Case, one presumed murder victim was found still alive, having suffered amnesia from her injuries and begun a new life in a neighboring state. The closing scene, where the cardboard box holding her case's evidence is folded up and discarded rather than re-labeled, could be the supreme visual embodiment of this trope.
  • In the Grey's Anatomy episode "Disarm," A local college is hit by a school shooter, causing a massive influx of trauma patients. At the end of the episode, Chief Webber comments that of the 26 people shot, including the shooter, no one died. Nervous laughter from the assembled staff lampshades the unlikeliness of this 100% success rate.
  • Criminal Minds. Especially notable since the show is about serial killers.
    • "Tablua Rasa" focused solely on the trial of a serial killer who had woken up from a four year coma. Amazingly, even when he escapes no one new dies (the girl they think he's taken turns out to be the corpse of his first victim, which he ran to find once his memory came back).
    • "The Crossing" features a stalker who successfully captures his victim but the victim stays alive because she plays along with his fantasy, allowing her to eventually be rescued.
  • In the season 6 premiere of Bones, Booth, dissatisfied with the Everybody's Dead, Dave nature of their work, forces his own Everybody Lives by finding a victim alive.
  • Smallville usually featured some deaths in most episodes, but thanks to Clark's Thou Shalt Not Kill policy, there's actually a fairly substantial minority of episodes, on average about 7 per season for 10 seasons, where Clark managed to save the day for everybody. So in about 70 episodes, nobody dies and Everybody Lives.
  • No one died in the Psych episode "Shawn and the Real Girl", though there were a few attempted murders.
  • NCIS usually has a Body of the Week. So it was surprising when nobody died in the season two premire "See No Evil".
    • Ditto "Bait" from season 3. And better: the supposedly dead mother in the episode was Faking the Dead, and shows up at the end.
  • Monk, which usually operates on Victim of the Week, has two episodes where absolutely no murder or death is involved: "Mr. Monk and the Missing Granny", which turns out to actually be a robbery, and "Mr. Monk and the Kid," which initially looks like a murder but later turns out to be a kidnapping.
  • The Mentalist would normally go out of it's way to have collateral victims even in the cases involving faked deaths or kidnappings, however Ruby Slippers ultimately becomes the first episode to put this to use.
  • The Grimm episode "Bad Moon Rising" doesn't involve anyone dying, but there is a brief scene advancing the investigation of a murder from the previous episode.
  • The Wild Wild West (such as "The Night of the Whirring Death" and "The Night of the Gypsy Peril").
  • In keeping with Mission: Impossible not being excessively reliant on violence, more episodes than you might think apply this trope.
  • Stargate SG-1 has several episodes like this, and they're inevitably either comedy episodes (e.g. "Window of Opportunity", "Wormhole X-Treme") or episodes with a very small cast (e.g. "Grace").
    • Stargate Atlantis has a few episodes where no-one dies. "Echoes", where the psychic "whales" on the planet manage to warn Atlantis of the massive coronal mass ejection that's about to fry the planet with radiation, and "McKay and Mrs Miller", where Rodney, his sister and his alternate universe counterpart "Rod", join forces to save their respective universes from an experiment gone awry.
    • Stargate Universe, the episode "Light" where the crew face imminent death due to Destiny being both out of power and stuck on a collision course with a nearby star. Turns out that Destiny flew into the star on purpose in order to refuel. The very-much-alive crew then manage to safely rescue the shuttle containing "survivors" chosen by lottery earlier, before the ship slingshots out of the system and jumps back into FTL.

    Music 
  • Ice Cube's 'It Was a Good Day' is the musical equivalent of this trope, considering the usual subject matter of his songs. "Plus nobody I know got killed in South Central L.A./Today was a good day."
  • Nickelback's "If Everyone Cared" is about wanting this but also states there are a lot of conditions that must be met for it to happen.

    Theatre 
  • Bérénice is the only tragic play by Jean Racine where all the protagonist live through it. The end where the lovers have to live apart still manages to be depressing.

    Video Games 
  • In Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door, you are led to believe that Grodus died from the Shadow Queen and TEC died in the explosion at the X Naut base. However, in the ending cutscene it is revealed that Grodus is still alive, albeit as just a head that hops around. TEC also lives, saying that he destroyed the facility so it could not be used for evil... And that afterwards, he miraculously came back to life with no memory damage. the only explanation he has is "I don't know how it happened".
  • This is one of the endings from the third game of the series Splatterhouse.
  • The Golden Ending of Mass Effect 2 has this as the result of the much vaunted Suicide Mission. Only if you fully upgrade the ship, gain the majority of the squad's loyalty, enter the final mission as soon as the crew is kidnapped, assign the mission duties perfectly - if you missed any loyalties, don't use those team members -, and make sure you leave behind the right people and have enough loyalty to Hold the Line. This is one happy ending you will have to earn.
  • At the end of Final Fantasy X-2, one of the protagonists details his plan to sacrifice his own life, and possibly that of a close comrade, to take out the Big Bad. At that point, Yuna decides to voice her honest opinion: "I don't like your plan. It sucks." She then goes on to explain that she's sick of winning through Heroic Sacrifice, and that this time nobody is going to die.
  • Done on a smaller scale in mission three of Ace Combat 5: The Unsung War, where, after you defeat the enemies and make your way back to base, Chopper starts counting the planes, then counts them again, and ecstatically proclaims that he sees three aircraft in the air, i.e. just as always returned in smaller numbers, his joy is understandable. Ironically, he would be the lamany as were sent on the mission. Given that every time the Wardog Squadron took off before that, they st Wardog pilot to be killed in action half a game later.
  • Tales Series
    • the ending to Tales of Vesperia not only finds the whole party alive and well, but the final boss too.
    • Tales of Graces is a second example Lambda's status is left somewhat ambiguous - apparently he "goes to sleep for a while." If you're playing Graces f, however, it's very clear he's alive and well in Asbel's head.
  • Sissel's mission, in each chapter of Ghost Trick, is to make sure the dead person in every chapter lives this time around. At the end he reverses time to ten years ago and saves Yomiel from the meteorite, erasing the horrible effects to him and those he hurt in his attempt at revenge. Everyone lives... including Yomiel and Kamila's mother, who were dead before the game even started.
  • In Dragon Age: Origins, most of the big quests require hard choices. The Dalish? At the very least, a whole bunch of werewolves (who may be innocent) Zathrian, and Witherfang/The Lady Of The Forest are going to die, even if you decide to spare the ones left when you get to the Gatekeeper. The Circle Tower? Even if you dedicate yourself to saving the mages, only Irving and a handful of other mages survive the carnage. Orzammar? All your powers of persuasion can't convince Bhelen to spare Harrowmont, or talk him down from initiating a brawl in the Assembly Chamber if you chose Harrowmont. But Redcliffe, now, Redcliffe... You can motivate people into defending their hometown from a horde of undead when they thought they were too cowardly. You can ensure that everyone still kicking when you first arrive in town survives the battle. You can save a mother who was willing to sacrifice herself to save her demon-possessed son, save her son by entering a battle in the center of his mind, and then cure the husband and father of the poison he was afflicted by.
  • Nine Hours, Nine Persons, Nine Doors: Play your cards right, and everyone'll make it out alive (save the 9th Man, but he bites the dust before the player even has a dialogue choice.)
    • The sequel Virtue's Last Reward also plays this trope in the true ending though you have to work quite hard to get it. This includes(!) the person who dies before you have any choices and like before, both the chess master behind it and the one person trying to kill everyone.
  • Little Busters!: The final end that Riki and Rin create has them able to save everyone from the bus crash, with everyone surviving. This is in contrast to the first ending, where Riki and Rin were the only survivours. However, there's enough ambiguity to leave it up to interpretation when the final ending actually happened, or whether Riki and Rin just created another, stronger world for them all to stay in indefinitely.
  • The original anime of Puella Magi Madoka Magica is a downplayed case. In the post-Madoka-rewrite universe Sayaka still dies from magic depletion at the train station but instead of Cessation of Existence she Ascend to a Higher Plane of Existence to be with Madoka. However, two video games based off of the series (one official, one fan-made) allow this outcome:
    • ''Puella Magi Madoka Magica Portable: You'll definitely have to Earn Your Golden Ending, as in order to even unlock it you must play as Homura (which can only be done after playing through as the other four girls and satisfying certain requirements each time in order to unlock the next girl). As Homura, you must also make the correct choices at certain intervals AND be strong enough to defeat all the witches you come across, including Walpurgisnacht. If you do, though, Madoka doesn't contract, all the other girls come to terms with the fact that they are effectively liches, and they hold a happy tea party with cake at Mami's place.
      • There is also the bonus route, where Homura decides to get everyone happy and willing to cooperate with each other so that they won't waste magic fighting each other or be at risk at falling into despair. The ultimate result is a Subverted Trope, as them spending time bonding meant they neglected to train for Walpurgistnacht, which means that even with all five of them fighting they still lose and Homura has to reset the timeline again.
    • Grief Syndrome has a more straightforward criteria - none of the girls die (run out of Soul Limit) through the five witches and their levels. Do so, and you are treated to this splash screen as your reward.
  • In general, players in some games can invoke this as a Self-Imposed Challenge, see No Casualties Run.

    Webcomics 
  • Subverted in the Zebra Girl Story Arc "The Magi-Net." After Jack defeats Harold DuVase, the mages whom he had devoured reappear — but in the next strip, they reveal that they're only there to say goodbye before they go "where souls're meant to be in the end," much to Jack's surprise.
  • Despite the extraordinary potential of Mad Science to create death, destruction, and mayhem, the heroes of A Miracle of Science manage to close the case on Virgil Haas without the death of anyone — including the Science-Related Memetic Disorder victim at the center of it.

    Web Original 
  • In the "Happy Birthday, Emily" storyline from the Global Guardians PBEM Universe, Omni-lethal assassin Demise (who can turn any object into a lethal weapon and is a master of every combat art) and Achilles are trapped in a children's hospital with a group of terrorists trying to kidnap the daughter of a US Supreme Court Justice, who happens to be a cancer patient at the hospital. Not only does the normally lethal assassin not kill anyone, she helps Achilles prevent anyone else from dying as well. When, at the end of the story, she's asked why, she explains that she never kills anyone on her daughter Emily's birthday. Emily, it turns out, is also a cancer patient at the hospital.

    Western Animation 
  • In the holiday episode for the first season of South Park, Kenny does not, in fact, perish in the usual way - whereas the creators had gone to great lengths to ensure his demise in every other one up to that point (subverting, as one reviewed put it "a time honored tradition that has been around for about ten weeks"). Lampshaded at the end, by having the characters remark 'Aren't we forgetting something?', with a meaningful close-up on Kenny (as if he was about to get killed once again), before the 'THE END' pops up, and Kenny lets out a triumphant "Woo hoo!".
    • A later episode has Kenny and a new girl fall in love. When his inevitable death occurs, she runs over to him and screams,"SOMEBODY HELP HIM!" To which Stan and Kyle reply "help....him?" All this time it had never even occurred to them to try and do something to prevent Kenny from dying. The girl gives Kenny CPR, and the episode ends with him alive and well.
    • And eventually the writers dropped the whole Kenny-dies-every-week gag altogether, making this trope fairly common in later seasons (although lots of other people are liable to die in any given episode.)
    • Kenny dies of course in the original version of Cartman Gets an Anal Probe, but in the end appears just fine, which leaves the four main kids alive and happy. Especially Cartman.
  • The trope is invoked in the Justice League episode "Flash and Substance", when the Flash and Orion survey the damage to the Flash Museum toward the end:
    Orion: I understand now. You play the clown to hide a warrior's pain.
    Flash: Dude, the bad guys went down, and no one got hurt. Y'know what I call that? A really good day.
  • Two episodes of Adventure Time, one set on a train and the other in a mansion, involve everybody supposedly being killed one by one as Finn and Jake try to identify the killer, but both times it turns out to be an elaborate prank by Jake.
  • In the finale of Avatar The Last Air Bender, Aang's past lifes tell him he'll have to kill The Fire Lord in order to bring peace to world. He get's around it by rediscovering Spirit Bending and stripping Fire Lord Oazi of his powers. He got to save The Big Bad and see all of his friends and allies make it out alive! Except Jet, anyway, who Word of God says died.

    Real Life 
  • Ernest Shackleton's crew on the Endurance became trapped in pack ice in Antarctica in 1914 and sank, but all crew returned to England after a long and risky rescue process. As in, they lived on the Antarctic ice for six months while waiting for it to melt enough to try to reach the nearest land (800 miles away) in a row-boat. (However, three of the crew of the Aurora which had travelled to the opposite side of Antartica were lost).
  • Apollo 13 suffered an oxygen tank rupture 300,000 km from Earth on April 14, 1970, and in returning to Earth had to travel around the Moon more than 400,000 km from Earth before the three astronauts' safe return. The movie Apollo 13 was based on this event. The documentary In The Shadow of the Moon includes some comments from Commander Lovell about this mission.
  • British Airways Flight 9 had all four engines stall due to volcanic ash before being restarted. The plane made a successful instrument landing at Jakarta on June 24, 1982 after the ash had reduced visibility through the cockpit windows.
  • TACA Flight 110 had both engines lose power during a thunderstorm but landed with only minor injuries to those on board near its destination of New Orleans on May 24, 1988.
  • British Airways Flight 5390 involved the blow-out of a cockpit windscreen with pilot Tim Lancaster left half outside the plane at 17300 feet altitude on June 10, 1990. After a successful landing and recovery, Tim Lancaster was back at work flying.
  • Scandinavian Airlines Flight 751 made an emergency landing near Vängsjöbergs säteri in Gottröra, Uppland, Sweden on December 27, 1991 after both engines lost power. 129 people; all passengers and crew members survived, it was called the "Miracle at Gottröra".
  • Hapag-Lloyd Flight 3378 ran out of fuel and landed 500 metres short of the runway at Vienna airport on July 12, 2000.
  • Air France Flight 358 involved an Airbus A340 wide body jetliner that ran off the end of the runway at Toronto Pearson International Airport and caught fire on August 2, 2005. These sorts of accidents involving planes catching fire had always been deadly affairs even when the aircraft had either landed successfully or failed to leave the ground. A combination of toxic smoke in a cramped enclosed space and poor human factors engineering had always conspired to make getting out of a burning aircraft a dicey proposition. However in the case of Flight 358 better designs and emergency techniques allowed the 309 passengers and crew to evacuate from the burning jet in under a minute without a single fatality.
  • British Airways Flight 38 lost power to both engines and landed just short of the runway at Heathrow airport on January 17, 2008.
  • Bristow Flight 56C was struck by lightning, causing severe damage to the tail rotor and forcing the pilots to make an emergency landing in the North Sea on January 19, 1995.
  • Eastwind Airlines Flight 517 suffered a rudder malfunction on approach to Richmond Airport on June 9, 1996. Two other 737s had suffered a identical malfunction, with catastrophic results. This time, however, the flight crew was able to regain control and the plane landed safely.
  • Two more Canadian examples: Air Canada Flight 143 (in 1983) and Air Transat Flight 236 (in 2001), both of which ran out of fuel in mid-flight (in the former case, due to Unit Confusion between Imperial and Metric), and were brought safely to the ground as enormous gliders, thanks to remarkable derring-do on the part of their crews, the first at a disused airbase in Gimli, Manitoba, the second in the Azores.
  • The Miracle on the Hudson, aka US Airways Flight 1549, made a successful water landing on the Hudson River on January 15, 2009 after losing all power following a double bird strike shortly after takeoff. Hero pilot Chesley "Sully" Sullenberger executed the near perfect landing and all 155 persons on board were evacuated safely onto arriving boats despite the freezing temperatures. The birds do not count.
  • The 2010 Copiapó mining accident in the Atacama desert in Chile. 33 men are trapped 700 meters underground for two months. All are successfully rescued. With a Rube Goldberg Device invented specifically for the purpose. Yeah!
  • The 7.1 magnitude earthquake that struck Christchurch, New Zealand, on September 4, 2010. It's a miracle that no one was killed by it!
    • This was subverted - another earthquake stuck Christchurch on February 22 the next year. This killed 185 people, despite only being a 6.3 magnitude earthquake, because the epicentre was located closer to the city (10&nbsb;km rather than 40 km) and buildings that were already damaged by the September earthquake and its aftershocks collapsed on top of people. One building's collapse (the CTV Building) was responsible for 115 deaths alone. It was New Zealand's second deadliest natural disaster in history, after the 1931 Hawke's Bay earthquake (256 killed).
    • Furthermore, the first earthquake struck at about 4:30 on a Saturday morning, when everyone was at home in bed. The second one struck on a Tuesday lunchtime, when people were out and about in the city.
  • The Talladega Prison Rescue. Prisoners tooks over the prison, and took hostages. The FBI responded by calling up the HRT and SWAT teams, who then stormed the building. The death toll of the raid was... zero. Not one hostage, FBI Agent, or prisoner was killed.
  • On April 13, 2012 El Salvador celebrated its first homocide-free day in nearly three years, due to a recent truce called by rival gangs Mara Salvatrucha and Mara 18. In the last three years, the average was 12 murders per day, reaching as high as 18. News articles even showed jailed members of the gangs giving thanks for the respite.
  • On November 21, 2012, the NYPD announced that there were absolutely zero reported murders in New York City that day.
  • Cleveland, Ohio resident Charles Ramsey became a celebrity overnight when he rescued three women who had been held captive in his neighbor's house for a decade. The women were in their teens at the time of their abduction and were presumed dead.
  • In 1993, Australian comedian/talk show host Andrew Denton devoted an episode of his show The Money or the Gun to interviewing 12 teenage cancer sufferers. In the 10 years between this and their reunion on his serious talk show Enough Rope, only one of them had died. While not everybody lived, it's still an incredible survival rate under the circumstances and a literally life-affirming story.


Electric Instant GratificationHappiness TropesFor Happiness
Estranged Soap FamilyDrama TropesEvil Is Cool
Everybody Laughs EndingEnding TropesEvery Episode Ending
Earn Your Happy EndingSliding Scale of EndingsSurprisingly Happy Ending
Enemies Equals GreatnessIdealism TropesEvil Cannot Comprehend Good
Ending Memorial ServiceDeath TropesEverybody's Dead, Dave

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