Dualvertisement
aka: Cross Promotion

Not every ad is for just one product or even those of just one company. No, high-profile movies will always attract companies looking to cash in on it. Or, sometimes, two companies are just trying to keep costs down (TV time's expensive), perhaps because neither company could afford to advertise on its own. For whatever reason, you end up with a Dualvertisement: a Crossover in adspace. More formally known as Cross Promotion, this trope's been in existence for at least as long as McDonald's has been giving away licensed toys.

While this has some pros, the cons often outweigh them; rarely do the two items/shows/etc. mesh, and the commercial can end up less interesting and more surreal as a result, or even result in straight up Fridge Logic. Often a part of a larger promotion/marketing campaign, since it takes a lot of effort for two companies to get together.

Compare Commercial Switcheroo, where you lead in with a fake commercial then bring in the real one, and Product Switcheroo Ad, where you open with one product then bring in the actual product later to show up the first one.

Examples:

  • As mentioned above, kids' meals often come with toys themed after a big-name intellectual property. The fast food joint inevitably makes sure everybody in the country knows. Not every chain engages in these shenanigans, though.
    • McDonalds turns it Up to Eleven by sometimes including toys themed after two intellectual properties. The one buying the meal usually only gets one of these, though (they get a choice of which one they want).
  • Speaking of fast food, Burger King/Hungry Jack's created the Iron Man Burger around the release of Iron Man 2.
  • Sometimes convenience stores will have Special Edition branded cups; annoyingly, these are seldom insulated.
  • The American furniture chain Furniture Row has multiple brands which allows a customer to shop their four different brands in the same building in different stores, saving advertising and rent money aplenty. It also makes it very easy to dump a fad furniture trend without closing an entire store (they started out as a waterbed retailer and when that went belly up, they just dumped it and moved on to other brands).
  • In 1985, there was an Italian TV ad where a man drives home a luxury car, checks the hour on a luxury watch, pulls the dress while casually showing the tag (with the name of the stylist), and then enter his home, where a party is going on. It's a spot for Barilla, a brand of pasta (as in spaghetti, rigatoni, etc.).
  • In the 2010 NBA playoffs, you saw this one a lot—there were ads for the new Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time movie, interspersed with shots of basketball players doing manly things.
    • In 2015, ESPN aired a montage of college football highlights to shill The Force Awakens; the Big 12 Conference politely reminded ESPN that NCAA rules prohibit student athletes from appearing in commercial promotions.
    • ESPN also managed to get ABC's soap opera General Hospital to promote the 2015-16 College Football Playoff semi-finals. In an awkward scene set at a bar on New Year's Eve, people dressed in "Who's In?" (a tagline ESPN had been using to promote the games) shirts blatantly touted their preference for watching the College Football Playoff Semi-finals, December 31st on ESPN (for the first time on New Year's Eve!), instead of going to a New Year's party. Right in front of a promotional poster for it.
    • Of course, ESPN had to return the favor too; the Orange Bowl had a report from Times Square by Ryan Seacrest at halftime to promote ABC's Dick Clark's New Year's Rockin' Eve. Later in the evening, the Cotton Bowl put up a graphic near the end of the first half advertising that you could watch a pre-recorded performance by Demi Lovato on said show (which also kills two birds with one stone, as she's signed to Disney's Hollywood Records). Michigan State fans were likely relieved that they could watch America's New Year's broadcast of record instead of the Curb-Stomp Battle that ensued (Alabama won 38-0!). If contradictory marketing was part of the plan, it definitely worked: ratings for the 2015 semi-finals were worse than the ones held only 364 days prior.
  • There was a commercial (probably featured on one of those "best commercial" shows) that started out as a Haagen-Dazs ad, complete with a passionate couple in bed with the yogurt. At one point they run out, so the guy goes to the refrigerator to get more... and his attention turns to the Fosters lager near it. Next thing you know, he's drinking beer and watching the game.
  • VISA made a number of entire commercials for real life vacation resorts and such, then noting at the end that said location doesn't accept American Express, so be sure to bring your VISA card instead. They do the same with the Olympic Games as they really do not accept any other type of card at the events.
  • On a more local level, an Austin, Texas, bodyshop had a commercial with a local roofing company owner, where he'd talk about the bodyshop, then move to shilling his own company before being fussed at by the director. Both were advertising hail damage repair.
    • Carlos and Charlie's always makes a point to mention its next-door neighbor, Just For Fun watercraft rental. Lampshaded when one of the spokesfrogs started with the latter name instead of the former.
  • Fittingly considering the series, a lot of ads for the live action Transformers movie doubled as ads for the vehicles that the Autobots transformed into. They even sold a special Ironhide and Bumblebee editions of the real life vehicles that included the visual modifications they had on screen. (which, sadly, did not come with rocket launchers or turn into an alien robot).
  • One of the Old Spice Man YouTube responses was a Cross Promotion for the Gillette Power-Glide razor... only it wasn't, because that would be in poor taste.
  • Lampshaded in an Old Spice ad that simply has to be seen to be believed. (It starts with a woman talking about Bounce dryer bars before the Old Spice Man suddenly interrupts the advertisement.)
    Terry Crews: OLD SPICE BODY SPRAY...IS SO POWERFUL IT SELLS ITSELF IN OTHER PEOPLE'S COMMERCIALS!
    • All the above products are under the Proctor & Gamble family, who were enthusiastic when their ad agency came up with the idea of the crossovers.
  • Goody's and BC, two brands of powdered headache medicine, have started doing cross-promotional radio ads; the two formerly competing products are now both owned by pharmaceutical conglomerate GSK.
  • Rhode Island family-owned furniture chain Cardi's self-produces its local ads. When other local companies use Cardi's production services, the Cardi brothers will have a cameo in those ads as well.
  • Phantasy Star Online 2 frequently does promotions in-game featuring items and events for other Sega products and anime.
    • One of the first and most well-known examples is a cross-promotion with Hatsune Miku: players could earn Miku's costume and hairstyle, and monitors in the lobby would play a music video for The MMORPG Addict's Anthem from Hatsune Miku Project Diva F, featuring Miku in PSO2's shop lobby wearing a FOnewearl costume.
    • At a fan convention in 2016, cross-promotion was announced with another popular MMORPG: Final Fantasy XIV. This includes costumes based on the Miqo'te race and a boss fight against the iconic Final Fantasy Odin.
  • Hatsune Miku: Project DIVA F is a song 'Tell Your World', which includes a stylistic rendition of how Vocaloid has spread globally. The original use of the song was for a Google Chrome advert that advertised how Miku is a global phenomenon, almost as a love letter to the same fans who, years after it's first use, brought the game to the West.
  • Raytheon Sarkos had a press conference showcasing the XOS 2 exoskeleton on the date of the DVD release of Iron Man 2. They even invited Clark Gregg, the actor who played Phil Coulson in the movie, to the demonstration.
  • Dodge once did an ad for one of their vehicles...which also somehow became an ad for two different video games and several other things (I seem to also remember an MP3 player, a computer and a TV).It's an awful advert due to the constant Product Placement and the fact that one of the kids in the commercial can't even remember her brother's name.
  • Dodge's sister make Jeep plays up the fact that its vehicles are featured in Call of Duty: Black Ops.
  • A Band-Aid/Neosporin ad features puppets singing their praises and how "when put together/they work exponentially better", just in case you never thought of bandaging those wounds you put goo on.
    • The PR department may have come up with the tagline after they found out that parents put bandaids on their children without applying Neosporin.
  • There was a series of UK adverts advertising common mixed drinks such as Jack Daniels and Coke, Gordons and {Schweppes) Tonic, Smirnoff and Red Bull, etc. Possibly related to this, there was a range of pre-mixed canned drinks on the shelves which featured the brand logos for both products.
  • UK adverts for washing machines often have a short section at the end recommending a particular brand of detergent to use in them.
  • Lampshaded at the end of a trailer for The Muppets: after plugging The Green Album (which features covers of famous Muppet songs), a caption appears on screen dubbing it "blatant cross-promotion."
  • "Sometimes you feel like a nut, sometimes you don't." This jingle was used to plug both Almond Joy and Mounds candy bars.
  • Baby Ruth and Butterfinger candy bars were often mentioned in the same ad in the 80's.
  • The Lorax (new movie) + Denny's (or was it IHOP?); The Lorax himself is eating pancakes in the chain restaurant, and has some light comedy with his buddy. Full of Fridge Logic- why would the Lorax be eating at a chain restaurant in an industrialized neighborhood?
    • There was also Mazda's ads for their new SkyActiv cars, complete with the Lorax and his forest friends shilling for the car, also incidentally promoting the movie on top of that.
    • Denny's also did this with the The Hobbit movie, claiming to serve a breakfast special large enough to satisfy a Hobbit... at least until it's time for second breakfast.
  • Jumper + DirecTV: While playing the standard commercial advertising the shows to be had at low low prices, the main character from Jumper would leap around being mildly interested
  • An advertising campaign by Dole in the 1970s used to sing "...those nice pineapple people, and a great banana too." At the time, Dole's primary products were pineapple products and bananas.
  • A series of radio commercials for website developer americaneagle.com consists of Testimonials from satisfied customers which also shill their own businesses. They usually have something in there like "If you like TV go to tvtropes.org. If you want a website for your business, go to americaneagle.com." (If Fast Eddie had done a commercial, obviously.)
  • There were commercials for Verizon FiOS high-speed internet featuring Michael Bay, complete with product placement for his Transformers film series.
  • An ad shown around March 21, 2012 for General Electric turbines mentions that their turbines are used by Budweiser, and then becomes like a Budweiser ad.
  • Any supermarket ad which mentions a specific product you should buy there. Or a product ad which adds that it's available at a specific supermarket. (In the UK Tesco is particularly prone to this.)
  • Vat19 often does this in their ads and even lampshades it with a short jingle.
  • A 2014 ad features the Ms. Brown M&M struggling to purchase insurance from the GEICO Gecko, because they only do insurance plans for humans, and not sentient candies. She proceeds to bump into the Hump Day Camel on her way out. Berkshire Hathaway owns both.
    • Another Geico ad features the Gecko changing mid-ad to promoting Helzberg Diamonds. Berkshire Hathaway owns Helzberg as well.
    • They also had an ad revealing that Geico customers were happier than the Pillsbury doughboy on his way to a baking convention.
    • Foghorn Leghorn appeared as an example of a bad audiobook narrator (I say, a really bad audiobook narrator, son) in an ad from the early New Tens.
    • Way back when they started using the Gecko, he was shown at a talking animal audition which included the recently fired Taco Bell dog.
  • The "Got Milk?" campaign did a series of ads with complimentary products, including one where the Oreo cookie got its name because a guy in the committee meeting to name the new cookie didn't have milk.
  • An ad promoted both Google Photos and Zootopia.
  • A YouTube commercial in November 2016 promotes both the 2017 Ford Fusion and the Viz dub of Sailor Moon. A very odd choice considering Ford's withdrawal from Japan several months earlier, and also since the target demographic for Sailor Moon generally does not consist of people who would be interested in sedans, and vice versa.
  • Nissan did a cross-promotion with the Star Wars film Rogue One with its 2017 Nissan Rogue vehicle.
  • Golf Channel runs ads with golfers plugging Titleist as their choice of golf balls ... and then Golf Central as their choice for golf news (the show happens to be sponsored by Titleist).
  • DNA testing service 23andMe did a cross-promotion with Despicable Me 3, in which Gru learns he is lactose intolerant (oh, and has a long lost brother!), among other things.
  • PAYDAY 2 is no stranger to promoting Dell's Alienware machines, even featuring masks here and its predecessor. With the Alienware Alpha, anyone who plays Payday 2 on this has access to the two exclusive masks. For a limited time, they also gave away the Alpha Mauler to anyone who could grab a code to download it with.

Alternative Title(s): Cross Promotion

http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/Dualvertisement?from=Main.CrossPromotion