Demoted to Extra

Over the course of three films, Cyclops moves to the back (while Wolverine moves to the front).

"Remember when we used to do stuff? You know, be out there with them and help?"
Bulmanote , Dragon Ball Abridged

We have a member of the supporting cast. They're important to the plot. Although, like any other minor character, they fall Out of Focus at times. Then comes the sequel, or a new season, or the adaptation, or The Movie, and... hey, where'd they go? They weren't completely written out, but they just weren't good enough to keep what importance they had in the original. The character's fanbase will complain, and everyone else may just accept it as the status quo. It's sad.

Opposite of the Ascended Extra; instead of a background or one-off character becoming a key member of the supporting cast, a key member of the supporting cast becomes a background or one-off character. Also contrast Spotlight-Stealing Squad; there may not be anyone in particular that takes these characters' screentime, and the presence of a Spotlight Stealing Squad doesn't mean no one else is plot-important anymore. In works when Anyone Can Die, characters fated to die frequently end up demoted to extra before their deaths.

This trope is for characters who become unimportant to the story, but are still seen or mentioned occasionally; for characters who disappear completely from the story as if they had never existed, see Chuck Cunningham Syndrome for when they disappear from the original work and Adapted Out for when they never appear in the adaptation.

Compare Shoo Out the Clowns, Sir Not-Appearing-in-This-Trailer, Not as You Know Them, The Artifact, Out of Focus, What Happened to the Mouse?, Chuck Cunningham Syndrome, and Commuting on a Bus. Contrast Ascended Extra, Breakout Character, and Ensemble Dark Horse.

There were more examples to this trope, but we had them cut out to save time. If you can see them, feel free to put them back on.


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    Alternate Reality Game 
  • Trick: Chutlo. He was originally going to be the hero and would defeat Jackoren, but he was later replaced by Daniel Duck and made a cameo appearance in Act 3. Subverted, though, now that he stars in the sequel.

    Comic Strips 
  • This eventually happened to Cutter John in Bloom County. Though he didn't disappear like the scores of other characters who were dropped from the comic, his role was dramatically reduced by the strip's end (Word of God being that wheelchairs are difficult to draw within the confines of a comic strip panel).
  • After the attacks on New York and the Pentagon, The Boondocks became less of a life-comedy strip and commented more on world news. It takes few to commentate so the strip neglected everyone except Huey, Riley, Granddad, Tom and Caesar. Eventually a few characters were brought back though, Jazmin was mad that Huey wasn't worried about her while she was gone.
    Jazmine: I guess you were too busy sitting here and making mean-spirited comments about the world to realize we hadn't seen each other for two years!!
    Huey: By the way, did you hear that "Meth And Red" got canc-
    Jazmine: AARRRGH!!
  • The London Evening Standard used to run a cartoon called Clive about a boy of 17-18 and his various escapades. However, the strip began focusing less on him and more on his ten-year-old sister Augusta, until he was such a minor character that the strip was renamed Augusta. It was recognisably the same strip, especially since it still had all the Running Gags of its previous incarnation.
  • Dilbert 's transition from slice of life absurdism to office satire meant the more fantastical characters were marginalized (Ratbert, Bob the Dinosaur, Phil the Prince of Insufficient Light) if not eliminated altogether (Zimbu the Monkey, Dawn and Rex). There's also Mordac the Preventer of Information Services, who went from a regular recurring villain to appearing infrequently.
  • On The Fastrack used to star Bob Shirt, but compared to the other characters, he was boring. For many years now, he has appeared almost exclusively in ensembles — the only exception being him complaining about his reduced role at Fastrack. Another Bill Holbrook comic, Safe Havens, used to star Matt Havens. He hasn't appeared at all in the last decade.
  • Luann was initially a comic largely about the titular character and her classmates and family. Once Brad, her brother, started becoming more and more important to the strip, gaining his own storylines, most of the teenage cast was downgraded significantly. Even Luann's best friends Bernice and Delta rarely appear, to say nothing of poor Knute and Crystal, themselves Satellite Characters of others.
    • They seem to have moved into a pattern: Brad and Luann alternate focus each week. Luann's storylines tend to alternate between using her parents and using her friends. Every other month we usually get a week focusing on Gunther and Knute.
  • This happens all the time in Newspaper Comics — the long-running American strip Nancy was initially based around the title character's aunt Fritzi (the original title was Fritzi Ritz).
  • Harry the Head was originally a major character in Oink!, with his strip occupying a full page each issue, and having a number of multi-part adventures. In later editions, his strip had been reduced to an occasional three-frame gag.
  • This happened to a number of Peanuts characters: Shermy, Patty, Violet, Freida, Pig-Pen. For example, in the 1980's and 1990's, Patty (not to be confused with the more prominent Peppermint Patty) appeared in a total of three comic strips. Word of God said Patty and Violet got the shaft because Lucy worked better as a female bully character, so it would be too redundant to have all three of them featured prominently.
    • In the latter half of the 1990s this had happened to nearly the entire cast. By the end of the strip's run, the focus had boiled down to four major storylines: the misadventures of Rerun (with Snoopy or Lucy acting as the Straight Man depending on the plot), the day-to-day life of Snoopy's desert-dwelling brother Spike, the travels of Snoopy's other brothers Andy and Olaf, and Charlie Brown and Franklin (who had essentially replaced Linus) talking about life while leaning on a brick wall. Charlie Brown's sister Sally would occasionally get her own Sunday strip, but the other characters (particularly Schroeder, Peppermint Patty, Marcie, and the already-mentioned Linus) rarely appeared.
  • Retail had a shake up in 2012 where Stuart, the store manager, was promoted to district manager, with his assistant Marla taking over his old spot. While Stuart still shows up, he doesn't appear as frequently these days.
    • Since 2015, however, Stuart began making more frequent appearances, either by talking to Marla by phone, or through his store visits.
  • Once upon a time, back in 1919, there was a comic called "Take Barney Google f'rinstance". The titular character was a diminutive gambler with a gigantic angry wife. The wife was written out, and Barney got himself a horse named Spark plug, and the strip was renamed "Barney Google and Spark Plug". In 1934, Barney found himself deep in the Appalachians, where he met a hill-billy named "Snuffy Smith". And the strip was renamed, again, "Barney Google and Snuffy Smith". Here Barney would live for 20 years, until he left in 1954... But the comic stayed with Snuffy, and Barney became a rare guest in the comic carrying his name, his last two appearances being in 1997 and 2012.

    Films — Animation 
  • With Ivan Sakharine's ascendancy to the role of Big Bad in The Adventures of Tintin, Omar Ben Salaad — a drug-running strongman from The Crab with the Golden Claws — is reduced to a mere plot-advancer, as proprietor of the third Unicorn model.
  • In Balto 2: Wolf Quest, Balto is the only character from the first movie to get any significant screen time. All of the other characters from the first movie who appear at all only do so for a few scenes at the beginning, including Boris and Jenna.
  • Kuzco in Kronk's New Groove, when Kronk takes the lead.
  • Finding Nemo: Gerald, the pelican who swallows Marlin and Dory, is onscreen for less than a minute, but was originally scripted with a notable role!
  • Todd in The Fox and The Hound II, where he ends up doing chores, neglected by Copper, and becomes The Woobie just because he wanted to play with his friend. Justified, since he was the protagonist of the first film, where it focused on his life before and after his abandonment.
  • Fun fact for Frozen fans. The lead characters from The Snow Queen were named Gerda and Kai. So where are they in the movie? Why, they're servants to Anna and Elsa, of course!
  • The Jungle Book:
    • The wolves, despite their prominent role raising Mowgli in the original book, only appear at the beginning of the original film and do not appear at all in the sequel or spin offs. Akela in particular: easily one of the most important characters in the book, here he appears for only a single scene and winds up being incredibly forgettable (he also gets a key appearance in an episode of Jungle Cubs however).
    • Bagheera in the sequel. Though he's one of the most important characters in both Kipling's book and in the original movie, in the sequel he's barely involved in the plot and only shows up to get beat up a lot.
    • Hathi has one scene in the sequel.
  • The Blue Fairy, while still an important character, has a smaller role in Pinocchio than she does in the original book. Many of her actions and dialogue are given to Jiminy Cricket instead.
  • Master Shifu in Kung Fu Panda 2. He gets a couple of brief scenes at the start, then sends Po and the Five on their way while he remains in the Valley of Peace until the very end when he does a Big Damn Heroes bit. Justified in that his character arc was mostly done with by the end of the first movie and someone had to watch the Jade Palace. Thankfully averted with the Furious Five, who appear much more this time around, and all of them actively help Po out throughout the film.
  • In Search of The Titanic:
    • Both Maltravers and the Duke of Camden; the former only appears in three scenes, never interacts with the main characters, and has little purpose in the movie; while the latter only gets to appear in one scene and doesn't even get any dialogue.
    • Elizabeth herself counts too. She mainly just appears in the background, has maybe 5 lines, and is only really featured in the beginning and at the end. And she was practically the main character in the first movie!
  • Zazu and the hyenas in The Lion King sequels (the latter don't even appear in the first sequel). Also Nala, although she didn't have a ton to do in the first movie.
  • The Little Mermaid:
    • Prince Eric has a recurring role in the TV series, is a supporting character in the second film, and makes no appearance in the prequel.
    • King Triton in the sequel.
    • Max the Sheepdog has minor roles in the sequel and TV series. He makes no appearance in the prequel.
  • Funnily enough, the Lorax in The Lorax. This is mostly due to the expansion of the present-day story about the Ascended Extra boy Ted, who is listening to the Once-ler's tale.
  • In the Rankin/Bass animated version of The Return of the King, Legolas and Gimli are reduced to background characters who have a few non speaking cameos, while Saruman doesn't appear at all.
    • Faramir also crops up at the end. In a non-speaking moment with no explanation as to who he is. In order to give Éowyn a happy ending. The perils of Adaptation Distillation.
  • Bamm-Bamm has no dialogue in The Man Called Flintstone. Pebbles is largely unimportant, but gets two musical numbers (one of them helping to motivate Fred to continue his espionage job).
  • Aaron, Moses's compatriot and aide in the Exodus, becomes less relevant to the story in The Prince of Egypt and does not personally support Moses until after the plagues have been unleashed; conversely, Tzipporah becomes an Ascended Extra. She instead of Aaron is with Moses in the staffs-to-snakes scene.
  • One notorious example is Ms. Brisby in The Secret Of NIMH II: Timmy to the Rescue. While Brisby was the main protagonist of the first film, not only does the sequel avoid giving any mention of what she accomplished, let any role in the plot, she is on-screen for a grand total of 25 seconds, and only has two or three lines of dialogue.
  • Pocahontas:
    • In the sequel, John Smith of all people suffers from this. He appears in the first scene of the movie, then doesn't get any more real screen time until very late. Justified in that he was presumed dead for most of the movie as a plot point, is revealed to be a cloaked figure in the middle of the film, and resumed an important role towards the end.
      • A few other characters suffered this worse, namely Chief Powhattan, Nakoma, and Grandmother Willow, as they only appeared in the beginning before Pocahontas left for England. In fact, Grandmother Willow only appears in one scene in the entire movie for about a minute.
  • Talia al Ghul is the Big Bad of Batman and Son in the comics, but her movie role in Son of Batman is quite smaller. Much of her original role is given to Deathstroke in the film.
  • Any character from the show who isn't SpongeBob, Patrick and Plankton in The Spongebob Squarepants Movie. Squidward and Sandy only show up a few times, and Mr Krabs spends the movie frozen.
  • Carl Jenkins and Johnny Rico in Starship Troopers: Invasion, effectively.
  • While not exactly "extras," you can argue that Mikey and Don are supporting characters while Leo and Raph are the main characters of TMNT.
  • Slinky. His role in Toy Story 3 is much smaller compared to his part in the first and second films; he is a background character for the majority of the time and his only real standout scene is helping old pal Woody defeat the Cymbal-Banging Monkey, as well as briefly jumping across the trash chute to the dumpster before being thwarted by Lotso.
  • Several characters have this happen to them in Transformers: The Movie. Bluestreak, Sunstreaker, Huffer, Thundercracker, Skywarp, and Bombshell appear in cameos with no lines, Shockwave appears in two scenes and is implied to die, Shrapnel and Kickback are reduced to Butt Monkeys and then rebuilt, Mixmaster, Scavenger and Long Haul do not speak, Blitzwing gets one scene for himself, Ironhide, Wheeljack, Brawn, Prowl, Ratchet and Windcharger are killed off and Sludge, despite being a major character, has no lines. Spike and the three major Autobots who survive the movie (Bumblebee, Jazz, and Cliffjumper) have more minor roles. Perceptor and the four other Dinobots (Snarl mysteriously receiving this treatment) are the only pre-movie characters to do much of anything in the post-Autobot City scenes. Even Optimus Prime is only around for the first half of the movie. Plus, some characters don't appear in the movie at all, leaving their fates uncertain.
  • Dogmatix (Idefix), while one of the main characters in the books, only makes a few brief appearances in The Twelve Tasks of Asterix.
  • Given the huge cast of Wakko's Wish, it's not unreasonble. A notable example is Minerva Mink; other than some solo lines at the beginning, she isn't exactly a featured member of the cast, even though she pops up here and there during the musical numbers. (Then again, it's not as if she was a big part of the original show to begin with due to Executive Meddling, but still.)
  • Christopher Robin was originally the star of the Winnie-the-Pooh books; in the poetry books he appears often and has several poems dedicated to him (as opposed to Pooh, who only appears in one poem in When We Were Very Young and only appears occasionally in Now We Are Six), and while he was moved Out of Focus for the Pooh stories he remained a central character. In the first Disney featurettes he was also a major character, but in later productions he got smaller and smaller roles, quite often being left out entirely.
    • This is sort of explained in The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh (and elaborated upon in ''Pooh's Most Grand Adventure"): He's started school. While the Disney version doesn't seem to be attending boarding school the way his book counterpart is implied to be, it's still reasonable to presume that he isn't around as much because he's busy with schoolwork.
  • The girls in Despicable Me 2. After being the main characters along with Gru in the first film, they essentially serve as living props in favor of giving the Minions more sequences. The Minions even get a role in the villain plot while Margo, Edith and Agnes sit on the sidelines.
  • Twilight Sparkle in My Little Pony: Equestria Girls – Friendship Games. As in, the original Twilight Sparkle — her native human world version (who was alluded to in the original movie and made a cameo in The Stinger of the first sequel) gets a major role in the film, and causes the portal between both worlds to be sealed. After the entire plot plays out and things go back to normal, the original Twilight only crosses over to the human world in the film's last moments.
  • Flash Sentry has also been pushed further into the background as the movies have progressed, most likely due to the backlash he garnered as a Satellite Love Interest.

  • Malin Berggren used to be the lead vocalist of Ace of Base for the first two studio albums, then got more and more into the background note  and her sister Jenny had to fill the void, and eventually quit the band (and her sister a few years later as well).
  • After the Smile sessions ground to a halt, Brian Wilson's role in The Beach Boys diminished significantly, though he did manage to pitch in a few great songs on each album (many of them leftover Smile songs, in fact). His mental illness certainly didn't help.
  • Alan Myers was the drummer for Devo up until the mid-eighties, after they recorded Shout. By that point Devo had made him somewhat obsolete on record, relying increasingly on drum machines rather than acoustic drums, so Myers left essentially out of creative boredom.
  • Cut Man and Guts Man, despite being two of the more well known Robot Masters, don't show up at all in the Megatainment album. There's been talk of making a Megatainment Pt. 2, but The Megas have expressed a desire to finish the Mega Man 3 album before they get to work on that, and there's the issue of how they're going to fill it with more than just the songs for those two.note 
  • Mercury Rev flautist was credited as part of the guest orchestra from All Is Dream onwards. It was generous to credit her as a band member to begin with considering that she didn't play on every song and didn't appear with the band in interviews and photo shoots.
    • David Fridmann gradually phased himself out of the band, first declining to tour with them from 1995 onwards and then quitting as bass player before 2005's The Secret Migration while continuing to produce the band's albums. However, he remained credited as the band's bass player while still a studio player, making this case an aversion.
  • Roger Waters-I mean Pink Floyd did this to Richard Wright, as he was no longer a member of the band during The Wall but still played on that album. Their next album, The Final Cut, lacked him altogether. David Gilmour brought him back, but still as an extra on the first Waters-less album A Momentary Lapse of Reason. Then The Division Bell (the final album of the band) credited Wright as a band member again.
    • Before that, the band did this to Syd Barrett, due to his drug use causing increasingly erratic behavior. He only appears on a few tracks on their second album.
  • Pixies member Kim Deal was highly prominent on the debut album as a vocalist. On the following ones, not so much, as Black Francis started to develop an I Am the Band attitude.
  • The Rolling Stones:
    • Keyboardist Ian Stewart was an original member, but when they began recording in 1963 their manager, Andrew "Loog" Oldham, had him officially demoted to road manager, mainly because his straitlaced, short-haired look didn't fit the image Oldham was trying to cultivate for the band. Because the band still liked him, Stewart did continue to appear on the Stones' recordings, though, and occasionally performed with them on stage until his death and was inducted with the rest of the band into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1989. He - by any meaningful measure - was still a full member of the band, so his demotion really only was relevant in promotional material.
    • Less dramatically, this is more or less what happened to Brian Jones as the '60s progressed. Originally the Stones' leader, Jones was relegated to an increasingly secondary role in the group, due to the emergence of the Jagger-Richards partnership (Jones didn't write any songs and wasn't a big creative force in the band) and his own personal problems. His last album, Let It Bleed, features him on just two tracks (congas on Midnight Rambler and autoharp on You Got the Silver).
  • This happened more and more to Alex Lifeson of Rush as the 80s progressed, his guitars taking a back seat to Geddy Lee's synths. Starting around Roll The Bones, he's come back to the forefront.
  • SKE48:
    • Sato Sumire used to be a solid member of the Undergirls in the elections, but her rank has dropped each year, and now she ranks in Future Girls.
    • Watanabe Miyuki ended up dropping out of the senbatsu in the 2014 elections, ranking in the Under Girls.
  • Kimono My House-era Sparks bassist Martin Gordon was annoyed when he saw the final album pressing, as on the back the planned band photo had been replaced with a large colour photo of the Mael brothers, with him, guitarist Adrian Fisher and drummer Norman "Dinky" Diamond being relegated to smaller, black-and-white portraits.
  • David Palmer, Steely Dan's "original" lead singer (he only sang on three tracks on the first album, as well as in concerts) was bumped down to one of several backing vocalists for Countdown to Ecstasy. No surprise that he's gone by Pretzel Logic, since the band had abandoned touring.
  • Ron Asheton of The Stooges was bumped to bass on Raw Power.
  • In spite of their popularity and influence, Uriah Heep is less well remembered than other early metal groups, though they probably have more recognition in prog rock circles.
  • Zero-G was one of the first ever VOCALOID's, and yet he gets the least amount of recognition (and fanart).
  • A factor in guitarist/keyboadist David Gregory's departure from XTC. Andy Partridge bought a synthesizer that allowed him to create string arrangements, something Gregory had done in the past.
  • This happened to Dusty and Frank of ZZ Top on Eliminator: despite them being credited on the album sleeve, Dusty's bass being replaced by keyboardsnote  and Frank by drum machines. For all intents and purposes, Eliminator is a Billy solo album (excepting Dusty's lead vocals on "I Got The Six" and "Bad Girl") with contributions by pre-production engineer Linden Hudson, who contributed drum machine programming and keyboard sequencing, and was alleged to have co-written most of the material, to the point that the band got into a legal conflict that was settled with him being granted the copyright to "Thug". Hudson had also showed Billy some research he'd done previously that most popular rock songs used the tempo of 120 beats per minute, which influenced Billy to write most of the album's songs at that tempo. And when the combination of blues guitar and incongruously synthesised backing tracks sent the album to diamond status, the formula was repeated on Afterburner and Recycler, and even led to the infamous rereleases of the band's past albums that replaced Frank's drums with drum machines. While the band continued using electronic loops and synth elements, Dusty's bass and Frank's actual drums returned to prominence starting with Antenna and Rhythmeen.
  • Blues helped to create Rock & Roll and yet never sees much in the way of thanks or tribute from any of the sub-genres that sprouted from its existence. Blues, being characteristically not particularly glory-seeking is probably okay with this.
    • A lot of early Rock & Roll and classic rock hits, especially from the British Invasion, were covers of old Blues songs. The similarities are so close, Sam Phillips famously said "Rock & Roll is just the Blues sped up."
  • Hip-Hop DJ's; while still prominent on tours and the mix-tape circuit they have all but disappeared from mainstream media. In fact a cynic could say the same thing about all of the other "pillars of hip-hop".
  • A common occurrence when a music group has a breakout star who leaves the group for a solo career. The other members of the group usually fade into the background, until the star decides to feature them during a special segment on tour, or record a song with them, just to remind the fans of the star's origins. For example: Beyoncé of Destinys Child fame, sometimes reunites with some of her old group members to do songs while on tour. Michael Jackson was also known for reuniting with his brothers to reform the Jackson 5 at times.

  • Gottlieb's Rocky pinball, based on Rocky III, reduces Clubber Lang to a small figure on the backglass with his face covered.
  • During development of Terminator 2: Judgment Day, pre-release secrecy and fears the pinball could be released before the film resulted in the near-total removal of Robert Patrick and the T-1000 from the playfield or the backglassnote . When the dot-matrix display programming was nearly completed, the "liquid metal" T-1000 was public knowledge, which allowed him to be included in the display animations.

    Puppet Shows 
  • After the untimely deaths of Jim Henson and Richard Hunt, most of The Muppets they once played were handed down to new performers, starting with The Muppet Christmas Carol. However, Henson's Rowlf and Dr. Teeth and Hunt's Janice and Scooter, all formerly major characters with sizable roles in previous Muppet productions, would be reduced to non-speaking background appearances or not appear at all. The Muppets reversed this, as all four characters were as prominent as ever in the various trailers and the film itself.
  • The Muppets:
    • Rizzo the rat is no longer interacting with Gonzo in this adaptation and is only seen in crowd shots, probably due to Steve Whitmire being really busy as Kermit. Kermit's nephew Robin suffers a similar fate.
    • Dave Goelz's characters (Gonzo, Bunsen Honeydew, Zoot) get very little to do here. At first this seems a bit bizarre, since Dave is one of the only puppeteers from The Muppet Show era still performing his characters consistently but when one realizes Goelz had shoulder surgery just before filming began, his characters' reduced roles makes sense.
    • Pepe. He was featured pretty prominently in some of the trailers, but it turns out most of that footage came from the one scene he was in that remained in the final cut.
    • While most of the characters they once performed are given new puppeteers and voices in The Muppet Christmas Carol, Rowlf, Dr. Teeth and Janice are reduced to non-speaking cameos and Scooter is completely absent.
    • 80's Robot in Muppets Most Wanted, where he doesn't have any lines at all.
  • Susan (Loretta Long) on Sesame Street was part of the series' original human cast and remained a major character for almost 30 years, until around the late 90s when she was gradually phased out. By the 2010s, she only appeared in one episode per season; she made no new appearances in season 43, and in the 44th and 45th seasons she was reduced to just a backround extra.
    • Many of the other human cast members have suffered similiar fates in recent years including Bob, Gordon,Maria and Gina.

  • Grytpype-Thynne and Moriarty tend to get this for any episode of The Goon Show where there's a guest star playing a unique villain instead.
  • Due Ana taking the co-host spot from him, Ben's gradually lost a lot of his old prominence on The Young Turks. He's been regulated to guest host and Power Panel member, with Rick quickly taking over as host of TYT Sports.

  • Dino Attack RPG:
    • Atton Rand introduced a number of NPCs during the Adventurers' Island story arc, resulting in his own primary character being taken out of focus in favor of stories focusing on the various medics and Kate's efforts to fit in with the team.
    • While technically they do have a significant part in the story, the four official members of the Dino Attack Team have barely appeared in the RPG.
    • Libo, who once appeared frequently in the Dino Attack RPG, has barely been seen or mentioned, especially following the idealist-realist debate. He was finally revealed to have had a Bridge Dropped on Him (literally).
  • As with Comic Book Limbo, both players and entire campaigns came and went over the course of the ten-year history of the Global Guardians PBEM Universe. As they did, most of the characters involved would fade from being important main characters to being supporting NPCs to eventually being background color.
  • Thunderhawk in The Legend Of Heroes Tales Of The World.
  • Ithilrandir fell prey to this for a while in The Massive Multi-Fandom RPG —only appearing once in a blue moon, apparently eternally lagging kilometers behind the group and only popping up to remind that he exists, then going Out of Focus again (his player was having problems finding time to RP). He since recovered.
  • In The Sky Tides, Kefka, after being dropped, became a mod-controlled NPC due to his importance to the plot. Ocelot, too, near the end. Other dropped characters, like Chrome, have had cameos after leaving, though they are turned into Lawyer Friendly Cameos with their names no longer mentioned in case somebody else wishes to app the character.
  • In Smile For The Camera Monster Mashers, after Frankie was put into the hospital after the Lady War incident, we haven't seen much of him.
  • Inverted in Super Robot Wars Unlimited Generation with Auel in contrast to his treatment in Super Robot Wars K and Super Robot Wars L and then taken a little bit further. Whereas in those games, he's only around for cutscenes (if even that!), he's managed to survive for quite a while, even outliving Stella.
  • Suzaku suffered from this in TURNINGCOLORS, he didn't even appear in the Narita 'turn'. He got promoted to supporting character to Euphemia after the events at Shikinei Island.
  • Happens in The Velvet Key to anyone apped from the actual Persona series. Poor Minato.
  • Anno R, by himself in We Are At A Teen Sleepover.
  • We Are Our Avatars:
    • Dee. Shortly after 3Dee's introduction, she would usually only say anything whenever Cupid was involved or during introductions and would tend to sleep the rest of the time. And then Rachel Elizabeth Dare appeared, which pushed Dee's speaking appearances back down into "pretty much nil" territory. You just can't win, can you?
      • Dee got better, leaving Osaka's Other to fall into this territory; she was a pretty major character in her first appearance very early on, but lost most of her screentime to Dee and 3Dee in her subsequent appearances, due to her writer's preference for the desdroids.

        Dee eventually left due to relations in and out of character spiraling out of control, causing Dee to leave.
    • Protoman appears a lot less, but Etheru is trying to give him more appearances.
    • Gandalf is usually this. Justified in that he's an old man(despite being undead) that uses powerful magic.
    • Deviot. Ever since his first appearance, anyway. He has a few moments, but rarely interacts with The Group.
    • Princess Zelda. She's still in the party, but she doesn't do much these days and usually only gets a couple lines here and there to remind the players that she still exists.
  • As of early 2013, Catherine made sporadic appearances in We Are Our Adventuring Avatars, since her roleplayer wasn't appearing as often in the game due to her schedule, and she wanted to try someone new.

    Tabletop Games 
  • Warhammer40000:
    • Aside from some old rules in White Dwarf magazine (and one Apocalypse formation in Warzone: Damnos), the Deathwatch have never had a substantial tabletop presence beyond the odd conversion kit.
    • The Squats used to be their own army, with their own lists, units, and models, separate from the Imperium of Man but a trusted ally to it. These days they are an obscure bit of background fluff which is barely acknowledged as even being in the setting.
    • Although no longer a playable model, Iyanna Arienal plays a large role in the 6th edition Iyanden Codex Supplement.
    • Lost and the Damned didn't get an army codex for Fifth edition - unless you buy the Imperial Armour books.
    • The C'tan went from being among the most fearsome beings in existence to being simply shards of their former power. On the tabletop the C'tan went from being HQ choices to their shards being Elite troops.
    • Although no longer a playable model as of the 7th edition codex, Wazdakka Gutsmek is mentioned on the Warbikers Datasheet and his Waaagh! is marked on the map of major Ork activity.
    • Although no longer a playable model, the Doom of Malan'tai has an entry in the Zoanthrope info page in the 6th edition codex.
  • Yu-Gi-Oh!:
    • Of the six Signer Dragons, Red Dragon Archfiend and "Life Stream Dragon" are the only ones not to be featured as a Cover Card nor a Ghost Rare. Instead, this card's "Assault Mode", "Red Dragon Archfiend/Assault Mode" is featured on the cover of Crimson Crisis and is the Ghost Rare of the set, while "Majestic Red Dragon" is the Cover Card of Absolute Powerforce and is the Ghost Rare of that set and "Life Stream Dragon's" Machine counterpart, "Power Tool Dragon" is the Ghost Rare and cover card of Raging Battle.
    • Brohunder hasn't been released in the OCG, yet.

  • In the original film The Little Shop of Horrors, the first customer is a recurring character who appears throughout. In the stage musical Little Shop of Horrors, however, he only appears in two scenes, one of which is a background cameo.
  • The priest who plays a minor part in The Most Happy Fella played a considerably larger role in They Knew What They Wanted. Whereas in The Most Happy Fella he silently approves of Tony's resolution to have "plenty bambini" by his wife-to-be, in They Knew What They Wanted he objects strenuously to Tony taking a non-Catholic wife, in return to which Tony accuses the Church of coveting his inheritance.
  • Benvolio doesn't appear in the last two acts of Romeo and Juliet, despite having been quite important in the first three. He doesn't even show up to cry over his dead cousin.
  • In Six Characters In Search Of An Author, all the lead actors and actresses that should be the focus of the play get pushed aside for the characters.
  • In Holy Grail, Belvedere was the only knight to make it to the end with King Arthur and led the witch trial. In Spamalot, he doesn't even get his own recruitment scene, and his iconic helmet is missing until Act II.
  • Rebecca (Sarah's mother and Chagal's wife) disappears from Tanz Der Vampire three-quarters of the way through the first act.

    Theme Parks 

  • BIONICLE has many examples, even after its Merchandise-Driven nature has faded. For instance, the Turaga: major side characters initially with a great story-importance, then got two full years devoted to their early lives, but from '06 onwards, they barely appeared in any scenes, and now... Where are they?
  • In the Transformers Generations "Combiner Wars" line, Groove, who previously formed one of Defensor's limbs is now an accessory to him as a Legends-class figure.

    Visual Novels 
  • Similarly, Kano and Minagi in AIR. Everything from merchandise to posters to, well, the backstory of the game makes it clear that this is Misuzu's story. Therefore, their routes are just there so the game can't be accused of having no variety — and when you think about it, if either of them wins, then the incarnations of Kanna will live and die in loneliness and pain for all eternity (especially with Kano's "good" ending). They were completely removed from the movie adaptation, and their arcs were shrunk to three episodes each in the Kyoto Animation version. They do each have one good figure, though. One.
  • From the original CLANNAD game we have Yukine, who, much like poor Sacchin, was originally planned to be one of the main heroines.
    • And in After Story, anyone whose last name isn't Okazaki or Furukawa gets shafted in terms of the spotlight halfway.
    • Also Kappei. He was a pretty important character in the original visual novel, but never appears in the anime, EVER.
  • Assassin, Shinji and Zouken in Fate/hollow ataraxia get much smaller roles than they did in Fate/stay night. Well, Assassin had a small role anyway. The latter two probably get smaller roles because the game as a whole is lighter in tone and they were two of the darkest characters.
  • Good luck finding a decent Shiori figure from Kanon. At least Kyoto Animation did her arc justice, and her falling out of the public eye might be because she doesn't have a "seven years ago" connection and is just a normal Ill Girl. In the 2002 anime, she, Makoto and Mai all fell victim to this, having their arcs squished into one episode each with key portions removed.
  • In To Heart 2 with the exception of Konomi and Tamaki in their special route, the Another Days game sequel swaps the roles of the winnable characters and the supporting cast.
  • While in the first game Reiichi Himuro and Ikkaku Amanohashi were capturable, in Tokimeki Memorial Girls Side 3 they're only supporting characters.
  • Satsuki Yumizuka a.k.a. "Sacchin" from Tsukihime. She quickly disappears on each route of the game despite being set up as another possible heroine, and in some branches she is quickly and cruelly dispatched by Shiki Tohno after becoming a vampire and declaring her admiration for him in a truly Tear Jerker moment. The anime lets her survive unvampirized, but other than that it didn't treat her much better; the manga, more of the same.

    In Melty Blood she re-appears, but as an enemy, in her vampire form. She is quite real (and dangerous) in the game, but in its manga adaptation she is the form that Tatari took after discovering Shiki's guilt for having had to kill her, and then he has to dispatche her again.

    She is more famous for how she doesn't appear that much on the other semi-official games, and the unreleased "Satsuki route" (which was supposedly planned and written but cut out, and is allegedly the one where the events of Melty Blood happen) is one of the running jokes of the franchise and the fandom. Within some fandoms (including this very wiki; see Meta below) she became the poster girl of the phenomenon (and former Trope Namer for this very trope) due to a meme based on the phrase "Isn't it sad, Satsuki."
    • Satsuki may finally catch a break in the updated remake, which is all but confirmed to feature her long lost route, and with it, a chance at not being fatally stabbed by her love interest.
  • Surprise, Haruki, in Setsuna's True End of White Album 2. He does this on purpose, as he realizes (rightly for a change!) that intervening directly would just make the situation more difficult than it already is.
  • The two main heroines of School Days are fairly minor supporting characters in Shiny Days. While Kotonoha remains a fairly important and sympathetic supporting character Sekai's role is both minimized and more villainous in order to give Setsuna more freedom of action.

    Web Animation 
  • In The Ballad Of Mike Haggar, Cody and Guy (key players in the actual game, Cody being the one who punches Belger out of the window of his complex in the finale) get a small, demeaning mention toward the tale's end. In this case, not a sour note for this ballad. This IS Haggar's story, after all.
    "This is not the ballad of Guy or Cody, / Saviours weak and frail and bony, / If you'll think back, and not too far, / Recall that I speak of Mike Haggar!"
  • Thanks to having Loads and Loads of Characters, this happens frequently in the Homestar Runner world. Inexplicably, Pom Pom (one of the original main characters) did not appear in the season finale of Strong Bad's game, despite Pom Pom being in every other episode up to that point. In fact, Pom Pom used to be one of the three main characters along with Homestar and Strong Bad, although now, his appearances are rare, and the annual Christmas/Halloween cartoons are the only times he'll be seen consistently.
    • The Poopsmith's demotion is, if possible, even more evident than Pom Pom's, as the Halloween cartoons just might be the only time he's seen at all anymore (evidently a result of the two characters being silent and bubbly-voiced). Still, he didn't do too bad considering he was an Ascended Extra to begin with.
    • Like Pom Pom, Homsar also didn't appear in the finale for Strong Bad's game—but he, like the Poopsmith, started out as an Ascended Extra (from a Strong Bad E-mail, no less!) and even then he was often relegated to clickable Easter Eggs.
  • The Most Popular Girls in School:
    • The Van Buren sisters are pretty much put aside for most of the second season to focus on the feud between the cheer squads.
    • Invoked in-universe when Ashley Katchadourian asks to be left out of the current conflict after all she's gone through. However, she has a pretty prominent role in episode 58.
  • Sister from Red vs. Blue. She brought the ship to Blood Gulch, and her arrival leads to the Reds discovering the underground caves. After that, she gets shuffled around from the Red team to the Blue team and finally to just bumming around with Doc, by which time she's barely seen. She appeared once or twice in season 6 and has not been seen since.
    • Sister suffered from all her personality traits being stuff that could not be done though machinma by Roosterteeth at the time. Anytime she is doing something, she ends up being off screen while the other characters comment on it, and that only goes so far.
    • Wyoming also suffered this. In the Blood Gulch episodes, he was one of the primary villains, alongside O'Malley; oftentimes accomplishing his objectives. But despite his role in those episodes, he is rather unimportant in the prequel portions of Seasons 9 and 10. Word of God is that this is due to his goofier personality clashing with the more serious tone the Freelancer bits have.
  • Spill:
    • Carlyle has stopped appearing in reviews, the last one with him being Clash of the Titans, only showing up to do ACOCO until eventually leaving that as well. This is actually because he has two other jobs reviewing movies and was burning out, so it was his own choice.
    • A good chunk of the LEOG went from regulars to Support League status on their own volition.
  • Deanna Troi in Star Trek Specter, oddly enough, given that she was a cameo guest star.
  • Howard Parks from the first film; in Star Trek Redemption he's seen exactly twice when we're in 2378, and unlike the scenes in Specter isn't present during the briefing scene in the observation lounge.
  • Supermarioglitchy4s Super Mario 64 Bloopers:
    • After the text font changed (starting with "The Warrior and the Hobo"), X started only making a few appearances in later bloopers, with Starman3 taking his original place.
    • Mejiacantillogustavo had a fairly major role early on, but in later episodes he only appears as a background character.
    • In-Universe example: Bowser was demoted to co-villain in "Two Evil Friends" because his evil plans constantly failed, and SMG3 was made the main villain.
  • Godzilla in Toho Kingdom Toons from the actual Godzilla series, however later toons give him more screen time.

    Web Original 
  • On The Brave and the Bold: The Lost Issues, both times Ross did team-ups between Batman and Henry Pym, Wasp was only "Guest Starring".
  • Mr. Luciano in The Classroom.
  • The Creepy Teen Years:
    • Randomideaguy. Former writer, main character, and editor in season 1, quite a bit less important in season 2. Isnt it sad RIG? ;_;
      • Randomideaguy even disappeared for the first half of season three, before showing up out of nowhere with out an explanation, both instory and IRL. NothingNow even had trouble remembering when he had last appeared. So, is accidental Chuck Cunningham Syndrome a thing?
    • Blackwave, and several Others also fall in this Category. Whether or not this is for the better is up to the readers.
    • Evilprodigy, Catboy, and Lord_Roem have less focus on them in seasons 3 and 4.
  • Iridescence and Doodlecute don't do much but stand around in Dusk's Dawn, despite being in an ensemble cast. Meanwhile:
    • Mister Brave saves Star Whistle from the magic ring.
    • Donut finds the antagonist and performs a Heroic Sacrifice.
    • Star Whistle fights against the antagonist using her telekinesis.
    • Breeze Rider saves the day by grabbing the sceptre.
  • Kickassia:
    • LordKat, one of the more well known and prolific contributors to That Guy with the Glasses fell into this in the second anniversary special Kickassia, due to Reality Subtext: he sprained both ankles during filming.
    • Handsome Tom also had this happen to him, relegated mostly to posing as Kickassia's flagpole. This was lampshaded in one of the "making of" videos, where Doug passes out the script and apologizes to Tom for having him be "an object". Tom takes it pretty well, pointing out that objects are useful. The other contributors have also said that Tom's okay being in the background because he doesn't think he's an especially good actor and is there mostly to have fun.
      • Fine enough to only making it to a cameo in To Boldly Flee.
      • Benzaie and Suede are also reduced to off site cameos, probably because they live outside the US and couldn't make the shoot that year.
    • Speaking of To Boldly Flee, Spoony, compared to his roles in Kickassia and Suburban Knights, had this happen to him, serving a much more passive role as a semi-comatose Distressed Dude instead. Justified in this instance as his actor, Noah Antwiler, put most of his acting chops into The Dragon Terl.
      • Similarly, Linkara is MIA for most of the story, but the actor is prominent as Linkara's villainous robot double.
      • Handsome Tom had three lines, one spoken three times, in six episodes. In the commentary, other cast members said he was to have gotten a slightly bigger role, but he begged off, saying "I'm just here to have fun" and doesn't think he's an especially good actor.
  • In The Lizzie Bennet Diaries, Kitty Bennet, who was the fourth Bennet sister, has been adapted into an actual cat named Kitty, while Mary has been turned into a cousin seen mainly in Lydia's spin-off videos (although she has appeared in Lizzie's videos).
  • Noob:
    • Relic Hunter guild is quite essential to the franchise-wide Wham Episode, but their purpose of being the Noob guild's Griefer is the only reason they are ever seen after that.
    • Arthéon gets a gradually diminishing role, first by being kidnapped in Season 2 of the webseries, then due to Real Life Writes the Plot. This has resulted in his character being treated as a secondary role in the upcoming movie material.
  • In-Universe. The Nostalgia Critic complains about Mrs. Brisby getting this treatment in The Secret of NIMH 2: Timmy to the Rescue, including a caption at the end that asks where is a statue of her.
    Narrator: But Jonathan Brisby's widow and her family stayed behind.
    Critic: Oh, nice. Mrs. Brisby, after all the shit she’s been through, gets the incredible honor of widow credit. Oh, she also did a few other things, but fuck it, they weren't important!
  • Andy had this happen to him in Season 2 of Omega Guardians having gone from a character with a huge role in Season 1's plot to sitting on the sidelines with random appearances here and there.
  • Several series that used to get a lot of attention in The Outskirts Battledome have had this happen over the years. One example being Haruhi Suzumiya.
  • Butter Golem in Sky Does Minecraft, who appears to have been replaced by the squid.
  • In Spearbreakers, the Spawn were originally intended to be the main threat to the fortress, but were soon superseded by the fort's own hospital and necromancers.
  • Blast the Hedgehog, who's rarely seen, much less talks, since the 4th episode of Taco-Man The Game Master.
  • Alex has largely stayed off the grid since the breakup of Tipping Forties, only appearing on Ryan's stream once in a while.
  • In Twitch Plays Pokémon Platinum, Togepi, the hatchling given by Cynthia, was sent to the daycare to learn some attacking moves, but she was sent to the PC and forgotten. Subverted due to fan-art portraying this as her life going through school while Napoleon is in his adventure.
  • Due to the large cast of Video Game Championship Wrestling, there are some characters that basically only show up in Royal Rumbles or Tag Team matches. A good example is Bowser, who went from being the one who finally overthrew Ganondorf's "1000 Years of Darkness" reign as champion to being an afterthought for a while. Other aren't even that lucky and get Put on a Bus.
  • On The War Comms, if there's a meta post with most of the characters, Christine and Olivia will be left off of the first version.
  • Feral in Whateley Universe. Made a few appearances before her author vanished, leaving the Canon Cabal uncertain what to do with her. She has only appeared in one liners since.
  • Zap Dramatic:
    • Ted is the main character in the first few episodes. Later, he gradually becomes less important as focus shifts to the mystery of Angie's murder.
    • Jim is a main character in Episode 1, and then all but disappears (save for a few cameos) until Episode 10. Even then, he is still only a supporting character.
    • Frank doesn't really show up much after Episode 6, save for game over scenarios and cameos. Even what dialogue he does get in Episode 8 seems to have all been recycled from Episode 6 to save the bother of bringing back the voice actor.
    • Dave the Brave's a pretty major character in the boy's plot on Monday, but after that he becomes a background character. The one other time he speaks, it's via recycled audio.

    Real Life 
  • Apple has done this to its Mac products with the success of the iPad and iPhone.
  • After the Virtual Boy flopped, Gunpei Yokoi was given what amounted to a desk job and had no real power. He would later leave Nintendo entirely.
  • Pluto. It got its own spin off, Solar System: The Dwarf Planets Saga. Much earlier, Ceres became the newest member of the Solar System, but, an influx of other similar characters (Pallas, Juno, Vesta) led for them all to be dropped. Ceres, luckily, got a role in the Dwarf Planets Saga alongside Pluto.
  • After a company merger with AOL, Ted Turner was given a figurehead desk job with no real power in the company's decision making.
  • Almost every US President ever after their term. In office, they're the most well known person in America but once their term is up, they sink to the background except for a few public appearances here and there. The one exception was William Howard Taft, who after leaving office was appointed Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, an extremely powerful position in its own right.
    • The same could be said for any nation's leaders. They're the most important person while they're in power, but then disappear into the background after they lose power. It's pretty rare for a former leader to zig-zag between this and Ascended Extra, though for nations that lack strict term limits the possibility always exists. (Australia is probably one of the few countries where examples of this exist, with three Prime Ministers having done this during their lives in parliament.)
    • Cabinet-level positions occasionally avert this. Usually a party will be in power for a given period, be replaced by their rivals, then come back to power a decade or so later. When that happens, ministers / secretaries who served in government the first time sometimes come back when their party returns to office.
  • Happened to dinosaurs: for a hundred millions years, they were the dominant animals on land. Now that mammals and humans in particular have taken over, what remains of them? Birds... Although it hasn't been too bad for them since there are about 10,000 bird species compared to only about 4,000 species of mammals.
    • Reptiles, as a whole, exemplify this trope even if they still play a big role in our ecosystem. Long ago, they ruled the Earth for more than 185 million years during the Mesozoic Era (compare the Cenozoic Era, which is barely a third in length) and were very diverse in their respective area. Some scientists believe that if the K-T extinction event never happened, the smaller theropods might have achieved an intelligence similar to humans.
    • The same might be said about synapsids (or "mammal like" reptiles that preceded dinosaurs as dominant terrestrial vertebrates. After Permian-Triassic mass extinctions, the only traces left of their descendants were tiny rat-like creatures that slithered in the shadows, while the ancestral archosaurs (ancestors of dinosaurs, among other things) became dominant.
  • In a manner of speaking, when a company, government entity or school district purchases new vehicles, the new vehicles are the ones used on the primary routes and/or long trips. The older vehicles are demoted to shorter routes, while the oldest vehicles in the fleet are parked in the yard and used as spare vehicles (such as when one of the newer vehicles is unavailable or in the shop for repairs). Eventually, it is the oldest vehicles that are sold off and replaced by the new vehicles, and the cycle continues.
    • An illustration: A school district in a rural school district covering 200 square miles purchases five new buses. The new buses are placed on the high-mileage routes and used for athletic trips. The buses they replace are then put on shorter routes, perhaps in-town. The oldest buses still on regular routes are then parked at the bus garage, used only when one of the newer buses is being repaired or otherwise unavailable. To mean – as a bus gets older, they begin fitting the trope more and more as the newer buses fit the spotlight.
    • The same thing happens on the railways, especially with passenger engines. The railway gets a new passenger engine, the fastest thing on the rails, and it pulls the big expresses for about ten or fifteen years. Then it gets an even newer engine, and the original one gets put on the second-string trains. Finally, after thirty or forty years in service, the former "star" engine is clanking around on branch lines or commuter routes before it gets scrapped or donated to a museum. Ditto for airlines.
    • And also for cruise ships — the newest ships get the most prominent (often longer) routes, while the older ones run less popular or shorter routes, and the oldest ships doing 3-day runs to the Bahamasnote  until they are sold off or scrapped.
  • In the West, advances in agriculture that made meat more widely available did this to vegetables. In Western cuisine, meat is considered the "main dish" with vegetables as "sides". Due to the health problems excessive meat consumption can cause, many experts are recommending that meat should be Demoted To Extra.
  • Mergers in general. As the big boys get bigger and bigger, even the moderately-sized regional companies in the same market are either shunted aside or gobbled up by the bigs. Wal-Mart and Target v. K-Mart is a good example.
  • Most of the world's remaining monarchies are now constitutional monarchies within a parliamentary system. In such cases, the real power resides in the Parliament (and in the person of the Prime Minister.) The monarch's position becomes largely ceremonial. Even in cases where the constitutional monarch has considerable residual or theoretical power (e.g., Great Britain), the power is seldom exercised.
    • Speaking of Parliament, the institution itself was originally a threefold system with the 'King-in-Parliament', the House of Lords to represent the aristocracy, and the House of Commons to represent the wealthy middle classes (the idea that poor people might actually have a right to representation didn't have much traction at this point). From the Civil War onwards, the monarch was gradually removed from this arrangement, leaving the Lords as the main centre of power. However, from the early 19th century onwards they too began to lose power, and its aristocratic nature was also reduced. Now the Commons holds supreme power and the House of Lords is just a technocratic advisory body.
  • This even happens to some countries in the course of history.
    • Rome used to have an empire but since the early A Ds, it's only notable for housing The Pope.
    • Iran (known for most of history as Persia) was regarded as the first world empire (under the Achaemenid Dynasty), when it conquered most of what was then called the "civilized world". It remained a major power even after the Arab conquest. Now? Just a third-world theocratic despotism.
    • Spain and Portugal used to be major world colonial empires during the Age of Exploration. By the late 19th century, they became less mighty.
    • The Dutch used to be a world power. Sic transit gloria mundi.
    • Ottoman Empire; it seized half of the middle east and some eastern European countries but after WWI, Ottoman Empire fell and a fresh Turkey was born. With Turkey's desperate attempts in becoming an EU member, it's obviously lost its relevancy.
    • Germany and Japan used to be major world military powers in the first half of the 20th century. America used to think that they would conquer the world by buying it. Later they just follow their much more powerful allies.
  • Your colleagues from school/highschool/university/work/volunteering. While it's likely a few of them will remain lifelong friends, the others will, at best, be reduced to an occasional chat when you meet them by accident on the street. Even with the advent of social networking sites it's unlikely you'll spend any significant amount of time talking to most of them.
    • Your parents. When you're a kid, they are the most important people in your life. However, as you get older and have a spouse, children, friends, co-workers, employers, and the like, your parents eventually become secondary or even tertiary people in your life. This varies by culture; there are some where even after the child grows up and gets married, his or her parents remain very much a big part of their lives (and are culturally expected to remain so), especially when they live close by.
    • Also your ex-girlfriends/boyfriends/husbands/wives/friends. Even if you remain on friendly terms, chances are you won't see them nearly as often after the break-up. There are a few cases where former lovers become best friends, but they are rare.
    • With the advent of Social Media, unfriending, unfollowing and, the biggest demotion, blocking. Definitely counts as a "demotion".
      • You also "grow out of" forums/other social media servicess and go from spending an entire weekend on somewhere to forgetting it exists or simply, only posting rarely...Both going from extremes of frequency to infrequent or nothing.
      • Back in the days when MySpace was the dominant social media site, the choices for your Top 8 Friends (prior to the expansion into however many you wished to list) showed just who had been demoted (in their own minds, at least).
    • Also happens when you have a fight/fall out with a friend or just stop getting messages/calls from someone. Moving away is another example...
  • Many works that either discuss or depict The Vietnam War largely ignore the South Vietnamese forces commonly referred to as the ARVN in favor of the American and Australian historical accounts of the war. The ARVN are considered to be the war's forgotten army. The films The Green Berets and Heaven And Earth are the two exceptions.

  • TV Tropes started out as a Buffy the Vampire Slayer fan forum.
  • Satsuki from Tsukihime is the center of the meme "Isn't it Sad, Sacchin". What makes Satsuki's lucklessness worth a section here, is that it even extends here, on TV Tropes. This trope was originally named "Isn't It Sad", after the meme in question. With the wiki's shift to less esoteric titles, Sacchin was—you guessed it—demoted in importance once again. She has since been demoted again; for a while, she was still the page's image, but she's since been replaced. Really, the only reason this page isn't a Self-Demonstrating Article is because putting it on the appropriate index would be a Promotion FROM Extra.
  • When a character-named trope has its name changed here on TV Tropes, it can end up demoting that character from star to being just another example. For instance, Spike is now just one more instance of Badass Decay instead of being the defining instance of "Spikeification". Nor let us forget Wesley Crusher, former tropenamer for Creator's Pet.