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Dashing Hispanic
aka: Badass Spaniard
For your sake, let's hope you didn't kill his father.

Fortunately for the Habsburgs, the union with Spain in 1519 gave them the services of the Spanish infantry, the finest in Europe: hardy, versatile, enterprising, and led by a hungry military aristocracy of the kind that was going to make Prussia so formidable in the eighteenth century.
Christopher Duffy, Siege Warfare: The Fortress in the Early Modern World.

A cousin of the Imperturbable Englishman and Awesome Aussie, the Dashing Hispanic is a Stock Character that rose to popularity with the success of codifying franchises like Zorro. Almost always an Anti-Hero (with the occasional Anti-Villain), this character is a rogue, skilled with their Weapon of Choice be it sword, gun, bow or even their own fists, and either Hispanic in origin or that setting's equivalent.

They are charmers, always witty and quick-thinking, and popular with the ladies. Their fighting styles are more about being athletic and striking with finesse than clumsy swings or wild shots, and their actions are governed by a strict code of honor they adhere to. They usually have a habit of swearing vengeance on someone who’s wronged them, and god help anyone who gets in the way of their revenge. Expect this trait to be played up in parodies.

Bonus points if he shares a name with a conquistador or an iconic Spanish author, if his Leit Motif sounds like Carmen on steroids, or if other characters literally call him "the Spaniard". May also be a Latin Lover. Will probably make use of Gratuitous Spanish. If male, his love interest is almost inevitably a Spicy Latina. No Real Life Examples, Please!


Examples:

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    Anime & Manga 
  • The El Dora V in GUN×SWORD. Seriously, for Super Robot Armor riders over 60, they didn't lose an ounce of Badass with age.
  • Capricorn El Cid from Saint Seiya: The Lost Canvas. One of the 12 Gold Saints, the most powerful warriors among Athena's troops, and the provider of the longest Crowning Moment Of Awesome in the series (almost two entire editions!!): he defeated two of the four Dream Gods sent by Hypnos even after losing his right arm. Through a Heroic Sacrifice, he also contributed to the fall of the fourth one, who had absorbed his dead siblings'souls and powers. Capricorn Shura, his successor in the original series, also counts, surviving losing all his senses during his fight against Virgo Shaka, except for the palate, receiving fouteen Scarlet Needles from Scorpion Milo and a couple of Lightning Plasmas from Leo Aiolia.
    • About Shura, there's also his fight against the Bronze Saints, where his very first move created a crevasse. And that was just the beginning.
  • Mendoza from The Mysterious Cities of Gold is pretty much the only competent adult, never loosing a 1 on 1 sword fight through the whole series. He's also the best helmsman and military strategist around, and on one occasion takes on a shark virtually barehanded.
  • In Yu Gi Oh Zexal, Yuma uses an Xyz Monster called Muzurhythm the String Djinn, who plays a short version of "pasodoble" music when it appears and attacks an opposing monster.

     Comic Books 
  • Capitan Trueno, who is essentially the Spanish Prince Valiant.
    • From the same author, El Jabato
  • Black Tarantula from Spider-Man and Spider-Girl Comics. The original Black Tarantula made his debut appearance by utterly demolishing Spider-Man in every encounter they had. Seriously, there wasn't a single confrontation between them that wasn't horrendously lopsided. Heck, one of Black Tarantula's flunkies made a habit of handing Spidey his backside. When she later got into a confrontation with Black Tarantula, he effortlessly killed her and then brought her back to life with his healing powers and put her back to work. This incarnation of Black Tarantula then experienced Badass Decay when he was later nearly killed by Bullseye with a single attack, and became something of an understudy to daredevil.

    A second version of Black Tarantula exists in the alternate MC-2 Universe. This version is the son of the one Spider-Man used to fight and has become both an archvillain, and a love interest to Spider-Man's daughter, Spider-Girl. After an impressive Story-Arc in which he was trying to win her as his mate, but also deceive her into helping him become to new Kingpin of Crime, Spider-girl learned the truth and was prepared to go at him with everything she had. Upon realizing that she was serious, Black Tarantula promptly got down on his knees and surrendered rather than be forced to beat the woman he loved, showing hints of the Latin Lover trope as well. Almost as soon as the prisoner transport taking him away was gone, he easily escaped. He has since defeated and taken control over an organization of trans-dimensional assassins in order to force them to cancel the contract on Spider-Girl's life.
  • Another villain who qualifies - sort of - would be the mercenary La Tarantula. There have actually been two criminals to use this identity. Neither has really amounted to much.
  • Vargas from X-Men comics. In his debut, he took on a lineup of X-Men consisting of several veterans, and a few newbies with only two flunkies backing him up. Over the course of this single battle he killed Psylocke and crippled Beast, while generally slapping the others around with little effort. He later beat Gambit in a card game, and always seemed to be several steps ahead of the X-Men both in direct physical combat and intellectually. Rogue was only able to defeat him by copying his abilities, and she was simultaneously using the abilities of many others whom she had copied in the past. Like Black Tarantula, he also experienced Badass Decay when he was later killed off-panel by third-rate villains.
  • Don Lope de Villalobos y Sangrin from De cape et de crocs. Much less of a charmer than most other examples, since he only has eyes for his lady (as the villainess found out to her displeasure) but very much a Master Swordsman.

    Film 

    Literature 
  • Inigo Montoya from The Princess Bride: a textbook example.
  • Diego Alatriste y Tenorio definitely counts, either in the original novels or the film, in which he is played by Viggo Mortensen.
  • Jeronimo, otherwise known as "El Desamparado", of Neal Stephenson's The Baroque Cycle.
  • Ruy Sanchez de Casador y Ortiz, from the 1632 universe, embodies this one. One character theorizes that he was the basis for Inigo Montoya.
  • First Marshall Roque Alva from Reflections of Eterna embodies this trope as fully as Inigo Montoya above. In fact, it appears that he (and the entire series, by extension) was created exclusively out of the author's fascination with the archetype...
  • Also, Raphael Kerna from Arcia Chronicles by the same author is the exiled prince of the Fantasy Counterpart Culture of Spain, who is a master fencer, a toreador, a favorite of the Arcian ladies, as well as The Lancer and (unwittingly) brother-in-law to The Hero Alexander.
  • In Greg Keyes' Kingdoms of Thorn and Bone Cazio fits this, being from a Fantasy Counterpart Culture crossbreed between Spanin and Italy.
  • Rainbow Six the novel features Francisco De La Cruz, a guy who attacks a terrorist armed with an UZI with a sword.
  • Edilio from Gone is a teenage illegal immigrant from Honduras who ends up as the leader of Perdido Beach's militia once everyone over the age of 14 disappears.
  • Esteban Trueba from Isabel Allende's The House of the Spirits. As there is likely quite a bit of true-life content in that novel, Trueba and possibly Allende may be candidates for the "Real Life" section.
  • Colonel Aureliano Buendía certainly qualifies.
  • World War Z has the story of an L.A. gang member, deported to El Salvador just before the war, who fights his way north through Mexico, on foot, armed only with a machete, during the height of the Great Panic. He makes it back to the U.S., joins the army, and serves heroically, but then is killed just as the war is nearing its end.
  • In Poul Anderson's Time Travel novella "The Year of the Ransom," Don Luis Ildefonso Castelar y Moreno, one of Pizarro's conquistadors, is captured by genetically enhanced supermen from the 31st Millennium; he gets away from themnote  and rescues a member of the Time Patrol to pilot a timecycle. Then Don Luis quickly learns to pilot the thing himself, strands his reluctant teacher in a peaceful backwater of time, and begins making plans to revise history in favor of the Spanish Empire. A hellacious fighter with an impressive intellect; the Time Police agents regretted that his worldview wouldn't let him join them, because he'd have been a highly desirable recruit otherwise.
    A killer, a racist, a fanatic; a man of his word, fearless, ready to die for king or comrade; Charlemagne dreams, tender little memories of his mother, poor and proud in Spain. Kind of humorless, but a flaming romantic.
  • Oberyn Martell of A Song of Ice and Fire comes from the Spanish Fantasy Counterpart Culture region of Dorne, and is a snarky aristocrat known for his prowess with weaponry (poisoned by preference), as well as for his promiscuity. He even fights a duel that is a clear Shout-Out to Inigo Montoya's famous one. His brood of illegitimate daughters are female examples, in particular Nymeria Sand. The charming and dangerous assassin Jaqen H'ghar also displays elements of the trope.
  • Carlos Ramirez of The Dresden Files is the youngest wizard to be made regional commander of the Wardens of the Council in history, and has the appropriate amount of combat prowess and charm to back it up. He loves to brag and joke about both his skills and his prowess with the ladies. Subverted, in the sense that he's also a virgin.
  • Diego Avery of Imagine Someday shows shades of this, though he's not much of a fighter and he's only half Hispanic.

     Live Action TV 
  • Colonel Luis Montoya, Big Bad of the Queen of Swords TV show.
  • Gonzalo de Montalvo, the main character from the tv series Aguila Roja.
  • Syrio Forel from Game of Thrones was the First Sword of Bravos, the Fantasy Counterpart Culture of Spain, and was hired to teach Arya how to fight with a one-handed blade. When the Stark household's servants are being slaughtered, Syrio buys time for Arya to escape by fighting five armed and armoured guards with only a wooden sword, incapacitating or killing all of them before having his sword broken. His last scene in the series has him still ready to fight.
    • Later in the series Prince Oberyn Martell, The Red Viper of Dorn, is introduced, who has all the trappings: cocky, charming, debonair, hot-blooded, a connoceur of beautiful women and men without distinction, hell-bent on revenge, and a master of poisons.
  • The short-lived television series Mr. Lucky featured Ross Martin (later of The Wild Wild West fame) as Andamo, a dashing, roguish, quick-witted and quick-fisted native of the fictional Caribbean island-nation of Guatamaca.

    Tabletop Games 

    Theatre 
  • The Cid (see Real Life) from Pierre Corneille's play of the same name.
  • Crespo, the titular hero of The Alcalde of Zalamea by Pedro Calderón de la Barca. Proud to be a commoner, he stands up to overbearing officers and noblemen, winning the respect of real-life badass general Don Lope de Figueroa.

     Video Games 
  • Luis Sera from Resident Evil 4. Pulls Leon's ass out of the fire several times during the game, and thinks that's a little rough, don't you think? We find out even later that toting guns and hitting on women isn't even his profession—he's a scientist for his day job.
  • Col. Corazon Santiago, of AlphaCentauri fame, leads the Spartans - a faction dedicated to survivalist tactics, guns aplenty and military discipline even in civilian life. She gets some of the most badass quotes in the game, too.
    "Superior training and superior weaponry have, when taken together, a geometric effect on overall military strength. Well-trained, well-equipped troops can stand up to many more times their lesser brethren than linear arithmetic would seem to indicate."
    • Basically, "We can kick your ass with half as many troops as you." Too bad the Spartan Federation tend to be one of the first factions eradicated (when you're not playing as them), since The Believers tend to have four times as many troops as the Spartans.
  • Miguel Caballero Rojo of Tekken. Complete with Spanish accent. And a dead little sister to compensate for Inigo Montoya's dead father.
  • Even though the game doesn't have voice actors for its dialogue, Matador from Shin Megami Tensei III: Nocturne is a definite example when you face him. He also uses a saber and capote, as befits his status as a...well...matador.
  • Vega, the claw-wielding, wall-jumping Spanish ninja/bullfighter from the Street Fighter series.
  • While not really Spanish, Al-Cid Margrace from Final Fantasy XII has the accent, and acts really badass. His design aesthetic is very much based on the idea of the Latin lover.
  • Ramiro Cruz from Total Overdose.
  • Spanish undead pirate Cervantes from Soul Calibur.
    • And Raphael, despite being from France, wields a Rapier and dresses more like a Spaniard than a Frenchman.
  • Punch-Out!!'s Don Flamenco, especially in the Wii Version, which gave him a more serious-looking design, made him less of a pushover to defeatnote , and gave him a gruff-sounding voice and dialog in his native language (i.e. Castilian Spanish).
  • Roberto from Onimusha Dawn of Dreams. Technically, he's only half-Spanish, but he's the strongman of the group, and while others rely on weapons to dispatch demons, he does it bare-handed.
  • You get attacked by an Inigo Montoya parody at the entrance to the palace at Arcourt in the Neverwinter Nights module The Bastard Of Kosigan.
  • The elven assassin Zevran from Dragon Age: Origins. Ironically, Antiva (the country he hails from) is a "fictionalized version of a medieval Italian state, akin to Venice".
    • Also Isabela, who is (supposedly) Nevarran, though her Ferelden accent signifies otherwise.
  • Alejandro "Alex" Cortez from Quake IV.
  • Eric Lecarde from Castlevania: Bloodlines. Instead of a rapier, he carries the Alucard Spear.
  • From a previous Suda51 game, we have Killer7's Mexican Mask de Smith, a soft-spoken man who dual-wields grenade launchers, suplexes pillars, and in one cutscene headbutts a bullet out of the air.
  • Agent Ramon in Syndicate (2012), who serves the Latin American Cayman Global syndicate.

    Webcomics 

    Web Original 

     Western Animation 


Cheese-Eating Surrender MonkeysEurope IndexEveryone Looks Sexier If French
Color Me BlackRace TropesDivine Race Lift
Violent GlaswegianNational Stereotyping TropesSpexico
Dark-Skinned RedheadStock CharactersDeadpan Snarker
The Princess BrideImageSource/Live-Action FilmsGirl-Show Ghetto

alternative title(s): Badass Spaniard
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