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Court Room Episode
This is an episode that's structured around a court case, in a series not normally focused on litigation. In other words, it's an Out-of-Genre Experience where the genre being shifted into is "Law Procedural."

Because lawyers get to have all the fun in court, you can expect a major character to be incongruously forced into playing one. They'll almost always succeed in arguing their case despite not actually having a law degree, or indeed starting the episode with any clue about what they're doing.

You should also expect an egregiously large number of Courtroom Antics, for reasons reminiscent of the Second Law of Metafictional Thermodynamics: since the writers don't normally have the opportunity to write such things, they'll feel obligated to cram in all their favorite ones.

Compare Jury Duty and Rogue Juror. See also Prison Episode, which this sometimes doubles as. (Or is sometimes followed by.)

Examples:

    open/close all folders 

     Anime 

     Comic Books 
  • The classic Legion of Super-Heroes story "The Legionnaire Who Killed" (originally printed in Adventure Comics #342), in which Star Boy kills an outlaw in self defense, violating the Legion's code against killing.
  • The 1990 DC Star Trek series had "The Trial of James T. Kirk," written by Peter David. It had a lot of Call Back to the original series with tragic, amusing and noble followups to Kirk's "violations" of the Prime Directive.
  • Two issues of Archie Comics' Sonic the Hedgehog focused on trails stemming from major developments. The first was Sonic's trial after the "Mecha Madness" incident and the second was Geoffrey St. John's after Naugus' ascension as king.

    Fan Works 

     Film - Shorts 
  • The Three Stooges episode Disorder in the Court has the stooges as witnesses to a murder trial, where they attempt to prove the innocence of Ms. Gail Tempest through Courtroom Antics.
    • Idiots Deluxe was another courtroom episode, where Larry and Curly accuse Moe of attempted murder, and Moe tells the judge about a hunting trip that went horribly wrong, leading to his attempt on their lives.

    Literature 
  • Most of the Sagas of Icelanders contain at least one, with plenty of fancy speeches and occasional bouts of Off on a Technicality.
  • A few of these in the Deryni works:
    • In the short story "Trial", Morgan visits a court conducted by Ralf Tolliver, Bishop of Corwyn. Morgan helps discover the real culprits in a rape and murder case.
    • Morgan is tried for treason and heresy early in Deryni Rising, and Kelson gets to engage in Courtroom Antics to get him off the hook.
    • After a drumhead court-martial, Kelson has Ithel of Meara and Brice Baron Trurill hanged.
    • On his entrance into Laas, Kelson collaborates with Archbishop Cardiel and Bishop Duncan ÂcLain in a very quick trial of Loris and Gorony. Cardiel surrenders them to secular judgement, and Kelson has them hanged right there in the hall.
    • An ecclesiastical hearing is held to decide whether Duncan and Maryse Macardry were legitimately married (which would mean their son Dhugal is Duncan's legitimate heir for the Duchy of Cassan). Bishop Denis Arilan gets to show off his scholarship with an unanswerable argument likening the Presence light and the Host to the Jews' Ark of the covenant: in other words, God Himself witnessed their vows.
  • The ConSentiency series largely focuses on the exploits of a Secret Agent/Bureaucrat Jorj X. McKie. However:
    • A good portion of the novel The Dosadi Experiment focuses on the courtroom drama of the Gowachin, which is much more interesting than its human equivalent.
    • The short story "The Tactful Saboteur" also features a Courtroom chapter. However, except for a few additions, the courtroom is rather orthodox.
  • The first few chapters of the Sector General book The Genocidal Healer are framed by a misconduct trial for the book's protagonist, though they mainly consist of a recounting of the events that led to the trial in the first place.
  • In Michael Connelly's Harry Bosch series, focusing on his cases as a Homicide Detective in the field and never at trial, The Concrete Blonde is this. It tells the story of when Harry is sued over the Dollmaker case, in which he shot a serial killer who he believed was reaching for a weapon. As the case begins another body turns up.

    Live Action TV 
  • All in the Family and Archie Bunker's Place: The long-running sitcom featuring Archie Bunker as the central character had courtroom episodes which bookended the series:
    • The ninth episode in the first season of All in the Family was "Edith Has Jury Duty". This Rogue Juror story sees Edith hold out for a Hispanic man's innocence in a capital murder trial, wearing on everyone's patience — Edith's roommate as the jury is sequestered (due to racial sensitivities and extensive media interest), and at home ... a lazy Archie. At home, Archie isn't even that grateful for his wife's sacrifice.
    • The Archie Bunker's Place show was "Small Claims Court," the second-to-last originally aired episode. Here, Archie's longtime friendship with best bud Barney Hefner is on the line when he blames him for damaging a television set during its installation at the bar.
  • The Dukes of Hazzard: "Coltrane vs. Duke" saw Rosco — frustrated after years of being the Wile E. Coyote in his usual cat-and-mouse game with the Duke boys, steps things up another notch by faking serious injuries and sues the Dukes for $50,000, the amount of their mortgage. Boss and Rosco rehearse the case, with Boss calling on his corrupt friend Dr. Crandall to testify as to the extent of Rosco's "injuries." Of course, in the end, Rosco is exposed and his case is thrown out of court … but not after plenty of Courtroom Antics, Rosco calling on Boss to be his butler (including a hilarious reading of Jack and the Beanstalk) and some high drama as — when the case appears lost — Jesse has his niece and nephews pack up the furniture and he sadly concedes defeat to his longtime enemy.
  • Blackadder had a rather memorable one in it's fourth season, when General Melchett hosts a court-martial against Captain Blackadder for murdering his prized pigeon (and disobeying some orders). What ensues is quite possibly the best courtroom scene in sitcom history.
  • Doctor Who did a whole season of courtroom with Trial of a Time Lord!
  • Both Adam-12 and Dragnet have had courtroom-based episodes, featuring on the roles police officers play in the judicial process and problems that invariably arise. For instance, the Adam-12 episode "Courtroom" centered around the importance of obtaining a search warrant when the defendant (standing trial on drug charges) claims that Reed had failed to obtain one.
    • Another was a Poorly Disguised Pilot for a show about the DA's office...good luck finding that show's pilot to see the conclusion.
  • The Brady Bunch: The 1972 episode "The Fender Benders," where a money-seeking man named Harry Duggan (Jackie Coogan) files a lawsuit against Carol by claiming their minor, non-injury fender-bender in a parking lot resulted in severe whiplash. Carol disputes the charges and – just when it appears that the judge will rule in favor of Mr. Duggan – Mike exposes Duggan as a fraud.
  • The first season of JAG featured onscreen courtroom scenes (as in American UCMJ proceedings) in only one episode: "Defensive Action". Onscreen courtroom scenes became much more frequent in the seasons that would follow.
  • Family Matters:
    • In Season 3's "Citizen's Court": When Carl squashes Urkel's rare Peruvian beetle and – after Urkel complains – reasons that "it was just a stupid beetle," the nerd becomes determined to see if a judge agrees, going to the local TV courtroom show "Citizens Court" (an obvious parody of that show). The usual hijinks ensue, with Waldo admitting that Urkel coached him on his testimony and Eddie claiming that his father is an ill-tempered madman (and Urkel trying to get Harriette to admit the same), before Urkel and Carl agree to settle. The opening of the show is directly copied from The People's Court, and takes a humorous dig at litigants of shows similar to Wapner's courtroom show: "These are ticked off people who are unable to settle the cases themselves!"
    • Season 5's "Presumed Urkel," where Urkel is accused of causing an explosion in a chemistry classroom at Vanderbilt High. Laura – who was at this point in the series still annoyed by the nerd's plays for love – agrees to defend Urkel's honor when she senses that an academic rival named Dexter Thornhill seems very eager to have him expelled. The matter is held in Vanderbilt's student court. (In the end, Laura uses a blacklight to reveal that Thornhill was responsible; when exposed, Thornhill admits that he did it because he believed that Urkel didn't deserve to win first prize at the science fair.)
  • I Love Lucy: One of the earliest courtroom-based episodes sees the Ricardos and Mertzes feud over a damaged television set. The Ricardos had purchased a TV set for the Mertzes, but when the picture tube blows out, Fred – claiming that Ricky knowingly gave him a defective set – goes to the Ricardos' apartment and kicks their TV. Both are even-steven after a judge hears the bickering couples fight it out. At the end, the Judge manages to blow out his own TV and then kick in the screen.
  • Sister Sister: When Tia accuses twin sister Tamera of distributing copies of her diary to fellow classmates, she takes her to Student Court. But the episode soon focuses on two yuksters who fail to take the concept seriously and turn the matter into one big joke. It isn't long before those two students are exposed as the culprits ... and the principal has a long, stern talk with them about the judicial process and why matters heard in Student Court aren't fun and games.
  • CBS Schoolbreak Special: The 1985 episode "Student Court" focused on the workings of a high school student court – students who assist the administration with conflict resolution and interpretation of school policy. This student court takes on another dimension: determining what punishment, if any, a teen-aged girl accused of shoplifting should face.
  • The episode "Testimony of a Traitor" in Buck Rogers in the 25th Century has Buck accused of treason.
  • The Farscape episode "Dream A Little Dream" has Zhaan framed for murder on a planet whose hat is that 90% of them are lawyers. Rygel and Chiana have to defend her.
  • Leverage has two of these:
    • In "The Juror #5 Job", Parker is a juror in a wrongful-death suit, and Hardison has to pretend to be a high-powered lawyer in order to stall the case until the rest of the team can finish the con.
    • In "The Lost Heir Job", the team takes on a client who's entangled in a probate case; Nate ends up playing a Large Ham shyster from Vegas.
  • Star Trek does this quite a bit:
    • In Star Trek: The Original Series:
      • "The Menagerie" prominently features Spock being court-martialed for stealing the Enterprise. He did it, but apparently he has Hero Insurance.
      • "Court Martial": Captain Kirk is accused of negligently causing the death of a crewman and perjury.
      • "Wolf in the Fold." Scotty is accused of multiple acts of murder and Captain Kirk effectively acts as his defense attorney. The start of Denny Crane's career, no doubt.
      • And the first half of the second act of Star Trek VI happens in a Klingon courtroom.
    • In Star Trek: The Next Generation:
      • Already in the pilot the Crew of the enterprise stands trial on behalf of all of humanity. And the final episodes conclude that this trial is never over.
      • In "The Measure of a Man", Picard tries to establish the precedent that Data is legally human, with Riker forced by the Starfleet legal system into arguing against him.
      • "The Drumhead" is centered around a court-martial about sabotage aboard the Enterprise, eventually devolving to a witch-hunt for supposed traitors (while the "sabotage" was merely faulty equipment).
      • "Devil's Due." Picard must prove that an alien being is not the Devil. Data acts as the arbitrator in charge of hearing the case.
      • "A Matter of Perspective." Riker is accused of murdering an alien scientist. His trial includes holographic re-creations of events based on witness testimony.
      • "The First Duty" centers around an investigative hearing into the death of a Starfleet Academy cadet while training as a member of the academy's precision flying team. The team leader attempts to cover up the circumstances of his death, leaving Wesley, who is also on the team, forced to choose between his loyalty to his teammates and his responsibility to the truth.
    • Star Trek: Deep Space Nine:
      • "Dax" looks like it's going to center around the question of whether Jadzia and Curzon Dax are considered the same person under Bajoran law, much as "The Measure of a Man" centers around the question of whether Data is considered human under Federation law. In the end, Curzon gets exonerated, so it doesn't matter.
      • "Tribunal", in which O'Brien is tried as a terrorist on Cardassia, is more of a Kangaroo Courtroom Episode.
      • "Rules of Engagement" is about an attempt to extradite Worf to the Klingon empire; Sisko defends him.
    • Star Trek: Voyager: "Death Wish" focuses on a trial deciding whether to grant asylum to a member of the Q Continuum.
  • In the rebooted Battlestar Galactica:
    • Most of "Crossroads" (the season 3 finale) is taken up by Baltar's trial for treason. Apollo ends up playing lawyer; Adama is randomly selected to be one of the judges.
    • The first season episode "Litmus" revolves heavily around a military tribunal created in the wake of a suicide bombing.
  • The Stargate Verse has had several:
    • Stargate SG-1:
      • "Cor-Ai" has Teal'c being put on trial for a murder he committed before his Heel-Face Turn, and Jack (primarily, but the others do help) has to defend him.
      • "Pretense" consists of a trial to determine whether Skaara or the Goa'uld inhabiting his body has a right to it. Daniel and Jack share lawyering duty.
      • Vala is put on trial by a planet of people she ruled over while host to the Goa'uld Qetesh in "The Powers That Be." Initially, the villagers wanted to execute her immediately when she confessed to not actually being a god, but her teammates convinced them to give her a trial. She was then sentenced to life imprisonment, but this was changed when she saved the lives of several of the villagers.
      • Another case almost happens in "Collateral Damage" when Mitchell is apparently responsible for killing someone, but avoids an actual court case since the charges were quickly glossed over under the pretense of Mitchell having diplomatic immunity. Instead the point of the episode is to prove Mitchell's innocence.
    • The Stargate Atlantis episode "Inquisition", which doubles as a Clip Show and features a Joker Jury, has the main Atlantis team put on trial by the Coalition of Planets (which consists of the various weakling civilizations in Pegasus who were brutalized by the Wraith) for their numerous Nice Job Breaking It, Hero moments and general Moral Dissonance throughout the series. The episode ended with them bribing one of the judges to vote in their favor, his vote being the swing vote.
    • The Stargate Universe episode "Justice" is centered around an investigation and informal trial about the death—eventually shown to be suicide—of Sergeant Spencer.
  • The Red Dwarf episode "Justice" puts Rimmer on trial for the murder of the Red Dwarf crew.
  • The 10th Kingdom has one when Wolf is accused of killing livestock.
  • The Odd Couple did a number of these:
    • In "The Dog Story," Felix is arrested for kidnapping a performing dog mistreated by its agent. He insists on defending himself in court, in his hilariously pompous and arrogant Large Ham manner.
    • Oscar rides Murray about being a bad cop to the point where Murray raids the weekly poker game.
    • A Whole Episode Flashback episode in which Felix refuses to let Hugh Hefner publish a nude photo he took of his girlfriend Gloria.
    • One of the show's many origin episodes explaining how Felix and Oscar first met, in this case as jurors on a murder trial.
    • And perhaps the most famous one — Felix is accused of trying to scalp an extra theatre ticket.
    Felix: ...when we ASSUME —- we make an ASS out of U and ME!
  • Several Seinfeld episodes, most notably the finale.
  • The flashforwards in the LOST episode "Eggtown."
  • Criminal Minds: "Tabula Rasa", in which a killer previously tracked down by the BAU it put on trial after awakening from a coma...with total retrograde amnesia.
  • Courts-martial (or preliminary hearings for them, at least) figure in several M*A*S*H episodes:
    • In "The Trial of Henry Blake", the titular C.O. is accused of giving aid and comfort to the enemy after Majors Burns and Houlihan file a complaint about the lack of discipline under his command.
    • In "The Novocaine Mutiny", Hawkeye is tried for mutiny after temporary commander Major Burns is accidentally knocked unconscious during an argument between the two men in the O.R. This leads to the two men providing widely conflicting versions of the same events in their testimony.
    • In "Snappier Judgment", the second installment in a two-part episode, Klinger is tried after circumstantial evidence pins him to a rash of thefts at the 4077th.
  • Episodes of Bones usually end with apprehending the killer, but occasionally the court case is included as well. Also, sometimes the killer is already in custody and the episode centers around finding evidence and presenting it in court.
  • Married... with Children has a few examples.
    • In one, Al/Peggy/Steve/Marcy sue a motel for videotaping their exploits.
    • The Bundys also went to court because of a car crash. They thought they'd win because Marcy was testifying for them but it turned out she was biased against anyone who owned Mercedes cars because her ex-husband had one.
    • Another happens when Bud is caught "relieving some tension" at the school library.
    • At one point Al is sued by the guy that tried to rob him.
  • Get Smart: "The Day Smart Turned Chicken." Smart is a witness in the court against KAOS, and they decide to frame him. Then he calls additional witnesses in his defense.
  • The Steve Harvey Show had two:
    • The first one had Lovita suing Steve after the TV she bought from him stopped working and he refused to give Lovita her money back. Lovita even tried to sway the jury by using the closing argument speech from A Time to Kill. The judge turned out to be a woman who was a backup dancer during Steve's Hi-Top days.
    • The second one had Lydia, Romeo, and Bullethead suing Steve and Regina on the real-life court show Judge Mathis over a confiscated thingamigjig that got broken. Steve and Regina lost the case when it was revealed that Regina broke the kids' computer/pager/PDA/whatever by putting Lovita's awful casserole (that bubbled while COLD) on top of it.
  • The Wayans Bros. had one where Marlon sued Shawn because he broke his leg and missed out on a dance competition due to slipping on some coffee that Shawn spilled. Much Hilarity Ensues.
  • Frasier has the episode "Crane Vs. Crane", where Frasier and Niles are expert witnesses on opposite sides of a court case.
  • The Mystic Knights of Tir Na Nóg has an episode where Angus placed in a trial for a crime he was framed, he has to defend himself while taking advice from a fairy who is secretly acting as his lawyer. Thing clear out when Ivar brings in the real culprit and Angus let off.
  • Doogie Howser, M.D. had "Eleven Angry People…and Vinnie" where in a take on 12 Angry Men, the defendant is a young man accused of assaulting his employer. Vinnie's not convinced of his guilt.
  • An episode of 24 from late in the second season, 4:00am to 5:00am, has President Palmer's cabinet vote on whether to remove him from office under the 25th Amendment. It takes place in a conference room, rather than a courtroom, but they call surprise witnesses, debate the spirit versus the letter of the law, and have impassioned closing arguments. The President himself even declares it "the trial of David Palmer."
  • Little House on the Prairie had two. The first was "Barn Burner", where town bigot Mr. Larabee is accused of burning down the Garvey Barn. The second is "Blind Justice", where a man is put on trial after being accused of swindling the citizens of Walnut Grove in a land scandal.
  • Pair Of Kings: Brady and Boomer were taken to court for blowing up the royal castle. (They were innocent.)
  • MythQuest: Episode 11, "Blodeuwedd", has Cleo on trial as Blodeuwedd for supposedly murdering her husband, the king. An odd example, in that it takes place in pre-Arthurian Wales.
  • The Charmed episode "Crimes and Witch-Demeanors" has the Charmed Ones arguing for Darryl's life before a tribunal that's charged to keep magic secret, and has manipulated reality to frame him for murder in order to do so.
  • The Golden Girls had a couple...one had Dorothy caught up in allegations about an apartment building Stan owned.
  • CSI: Crime Scene Investigation: 'Invisible Evidence', where the court threw out evidence due to a warrant problem and 'Eleven Angry Jurors' ,which crossed this trope with Forensic Drama when a juror died.
    • CSI: NY had 'Comes Around'', where Mac had to prove he didn't kill Clay Dobson when Dobson jumped off a roof in handcuffs.
  • 7th Heaven had an episode "Twelve Angry People", where Rev. Camden is (in an inversion of the usual) the lone juror for a guilty verdict.
  • While Community loves to gleefully jump into whatever genre catches its fancy, having an ex-Laywer as the main character means that this comes up rather often. Considering one took place in a pool, another was about a squashed yam and the last had a main character being possessed by an evil self from an alternate universe (or just having a metal breakdown), none were exactly "normal".
  • Murder, She Wrote had one where Jessica was called as a witness (amusingly, this one actually lampshades her status as a Mystery Magnet, as a cross-examining lawyer casts aspersions on her and her family for being involved in so many murder cases) and another one where she had Jury Duty and realized that a different man than the accused killed the victim.

    Professional Wrestling 

    Radio 
  • The Archers did several for the trial of Tom Archer, including an episode focusing entirely on the jury's deliberations, which was heavily publicised on its gimmick value as the only episode in the show's history not to feature any of the regular characters.

    Video Games 
  • Several BioWare games (Knights of the Old Republic, Mass Effect 2, Neverwinter Nights, and Neverwinter Nights 2) have sidequests where you either act as an attorney for a quest-giver, or are accused of something and have to defend yourself. Usually they involve all of collecting evidence, interviewing people, and making the right statements at court.
  • Chrono Trigger pulls an early one on the party-after returning from the past and heading to the castle, the Evil Chancellor immediately calls Chrono a terrorist and puts you on trial. Unlike the Bioware examples, success here is dependent on actions you took in the fair (return the kitty to her owner, don't eat the old guy's lunch, and let the Princess take all the time she wants at the candy booth). You're still slated for execution regardless of actions, but at least you get some items if you're found not guilty.

    Web Animation 
  • The Pimp Lando series mostly focuses on parodies and zany comedy. The last episode, "The Pimp, the Whole Pimp, and Nothing but the Pimp," has less zaniness and more courtroom antics.

    Web Comics 

    Web Original 

    Western Animation 
  • Several Futurama episodes, as well as a significant part of the last movie.
    Bender: Court's kind of fun when it's not my ass on the line.
  • Several episodes of The Simpsons too; among them are "Bart Gets Hit by a Car", "The Boy Who Knew Too Much", and "The D'Oh-cial Network."
  • Justice League has one episode where Green Lantern stands trial for blowing up a planet. Flash is his lawyer. Hilarity Ensues.
    Flash: If the ring wasn't lit, you must acquit!
  • SpongeBob SquarePants: "Plankton vs. Krabs."
  • The Animaniacs episode "La La Law."
  • The Grim Adventures of Billy & Mandy: "Keeper of the Reaper." Fred Fredburger, yes!
  • The Venture Bros. episode "Trial of the Monarch" has the Monarch as the defendant, acting as his own lawyer. He doesn't care for having the jury described as his "peers."
  • 101 Dalmatians: The Series: "Twelve Angry Pups"
  • Beavis and Butt-Head: "The Trial"
  • Garfield and Friends episodes: "Binky Goes Bad", "Trial & Error"
  • Duck Dodgers episode "The Trial of Duck Dodgers"
  • Capitol Critters had one episode where two characters were taken to the cockroaches' courtroom. One of the defendants complained about being treated like a human being.
  • A good deal of Wild West C.O.W.-Boys of Moo Mesa episode "Bulls of a Feather" was about Sheriff Terribull being taken to courtroom to be tried for the crimes of his criminal alter ego The Masked Bull.
  • Quick Draw McGraw once had to protect a key witness (Baba Looey) for a trial.
  • Recess: "The Trial" is the best example, but other episodes include "The Story of Whomps" and "The Biggest Trouble Ever".
  • Episode 4 of Clerks: The Animated Series revolved around Jay pursuing a Frivolous Lawsuit against Dante for slipping on a puddle of spilled soda.
  • The Smurfs episode "The Smurfy Verdict".
  • Batman: The Animated Series has the fittingly named "Trial", where the inmates of Arkham Asylum capture both Batman and new district attorney Janet van Dorn and put the former on trial (with The Joker as judge), with the latter acting as defense. Ms. van Dorn was an outspoken critic of the Dark Knight, being prevented from putting inmates in prison for life due to their being apprehended by a vigilante, and had made claims that Batman was directly responsible for creating all the supervillain scum of Gotham — now, in the Kangaroo Court set up at Arkham, she is tasked with defending Batman from those very claims. She succeeds in proving that each and every villain would've become who they were even without Batman's existence, both changing her tune on the Caped Crusader's role in society and actually convincing the inmates to find him Not Guilty. Unfortunately, being that they are such crooks, they don't want to pass up the opportunity to off them anyway — but since Ms. van Dorn did her job, it becomes time for Batman to do his...
  • Rugrats
    • Happens in the episode "The Trial" when the babies do this to find out who broke Tommy's favorite clown lamp with Tommy being the judge and Angelica being the persecutor. They soon realize it was Angelica who broke the lamp and she even admits it and gloats loud enough that the adults hear her.
    • In another episode "Pickles vs. Pickles", Angelica sues her parents for divorce after they force her to eat broccoli. The whole court is on Angelica's side and the judge even allows her to bring up her toys as witnesses. Luckily for Drew, it turns out it was All Just a Dream.
  • The Adventures of Teddy Ruxpin: One of the plots of "Uncle Grubby" was Tweeg being taken to M.A.V.O. court to answer for his failures.
  • The Dan Vs. episode "Dan vs Jury Duty". Antics include Chris being mistaken for an expert witness, Dan being disappointed that courtroom cases aren't as exciting as they are on TV, and Dan trying to prove the defendant's innocence after siding with him. It turns out that Dan is the one who committed the crime the defendant was accused of, although Dan didn't realize that.


Common Nonsense JuryThe Courtroom IndexCrusading Lawyer
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Country MattersOlder Than PrintCourtly Love

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