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Anti Police Song
"Fuck the police."
N.W.A., in the eponymous song

The Anti-Police Song is a subtrope of the Protest Song focused on being a protest of and/or an expression of anger, frustration, or disgust with the police or other law enforcement. The Anti-Police Song often deals with themes of Bad Cop/Incompetent Cop, the Corrupt Cop, Police Brutality, Police Are Useless, The Bad Guys Are Cops, percieved or actual bigoted/racist behavior by law enforcement officers, percieved or actual injustice and corruption in the process of law enforcement, and similar.


Examples:

  • Police Truck by Dead Kennedys, which depicts (in its uncensored version), police officers taking out a police truck for a night of Police Brutality and drinking culminating in raping someone inside the police truck.
  • ''I Fought The Law (And I Won)", also by Dead Kennedys (and a cover of the Cricket's version) fits this. It's about Dan White, a San Francisco cop who murdered Harvey Milk, and got away with it, largely because he was a cop.
  • Out To Get Me by Guns N' Roses, which is about persecution by the brutal LAPD.
  • Fuck The Police by N.W.A. is an obvious example of the trope, being a Boastful Rap about a Roaring Rampage of Revenge against the LAPD for its brutality and bigoted racism against African-Americans, putting the LAPD "on trial."
  • No Law Or Order by Hanoi Rocks.
  • Ridin' Dirty by Chamillionaire is a Glam Rap example that underwent Memetic Mutation.
  • Cop Killer by Body Count.
  • I Shot The Sheriff by Bob Marley, in which the narrator turns out to have killed the racist sheriff in self-defence.
  • ''Sheriff John Brown" by The Coral is an Answer Song to "I Shot the Sheriff", in which it turns out that it wasn't even the narrator who killed the Sheriff, but the even more racist preacher, who shot the sheriff because he had last minute qualms about killing the narrator.
  • Sound of da Police by KRS-One.
  • GO COPS by Rucka Rucka Ali is an Affectionate Parody version of these songs set to the sound of Kesha's Tik Tok - but one which makes the same points.
  • Doo Doo Doo Doo Doo Doo (Heartbreaker) by The Rolling Stones:
    The police in New York City
    Chased a boy right through the park
    In a case of mistaken identity
    They put a bullet through his heart
  • I Fought The Law by Bobby Fuller, Covered Up by The Clash, makes even someone who was robbing people with a weapon more sympathetic than the "law" that originally forced him into crime in the first place, then punishes by means of the Chain Gang.
  • Another song Covered Up by The Clash is Junior Murvin's "Police and Thieves", which finds commonality between the two groups in "scaring the nation with their guns and ammunition."
  • And there's also The Clash's own original song "Guns of Brixton", which flat-out fantasises about oppressed London black men killing the cops en masse.
  • Prologue, August 29, 1968 by Chicago had audio footage of the chant "the whole world is watching", which was chanted by protesters at the 1968 Democratic Convention who were clashing with Chicago police.
  • Chicago by Graham Nash also refers to the protesters' clash with Chicago police at the 1968 convention.
  • In Quebec, Bonjour La Police (Hello the Police) was a song by comedic group Rock & Belle Oreilles. Named after a skit of the same name, it continues its theme of depicting police officers as doughnut-obsessed, incredibly stupid violent individuals. The song is obviously meant as a joke and achieved memetic status in Quebec during the 80s and 90s, so much that saying "Bonjour La Police" to a police officer was likely to cause a rather hostile reaction.
  • Get Your Riot Gear by Five Iron Frenzy is very critical of Denver PD's reaction to the 1998 Superbowl riot. The liner notes have an explanation from Reese Roper that it's criticizing a specific incident, and isn't meant to be a blanket "cop-bashing" song. Then Reese cheekily adds, "It's a true story. If you don't like it, make all complaints to the Denver Police Department; they'd love to hear from you."
  • "Badge and A Bullet" by Stray From the Path. It focuses on abuse of power and the "above the law" attitude.
  • The Levellers have made a number of these, including "The Battle Of The Beanfield", "Dirty Davey", "PC Keen" and "61 Minutes Of Pleading".
  • From MDC, we have "Dead Cops", "I Remember", "Let's Kill All the Cops", "No More Cops"...among others. What else would you expect from a band most commonly referred to as "Millions of Dead Cops"?
  • The Pogues, Birmingham Six is about the wrongful detention and conviction of six men of the right nationality who were within fifty miles of an IRA bombing outrage in Birmingham, England, who were beaten and tortured into confessing to a crime they did not commit, by the West Midlands Constabulary.
    There are six men in Birmingham,
    In Guildford there's four of 'em,
    Picked up and tortured and framed by the Law
    While the filth get promotion, they're still doing time,
    For being Irish in the wrong place and at the wrong time!
  • Unexpectedly reversed in "On the Beat, Pete" by Madness, which is a song from the point of view of a kindly Old-Fashioned Copper who helps the disabled and lost tourists, banters with criminals, and is compassionate to tramps and prostitutes.

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