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All Nations Are Superpowers
In any given show where there is some sort of global conflict, or speculative fiction of any kind, there will most often be only 2-4 countries involved, and each will be described as a superpower. Obviously, this isn't historically accurate; the Cold War, for example, was primarily between the US and the Soviet Union, but many other countries had a stake in the outcome (e.g. nations along the Iron Curtain, and places like Latin America and Southeast Asia where communism was making headway). If there are two factions they will fairly often be The Empire and The Federation or The Alliance or The Republic, though usually neither is portrayed as "good" in this setup (ala Legend of the Galactic Heroes, or even Gundam), at its most extreme even factions that aren't sovereign nations may be treated with Superpower level resources. Of course, these "superpowers" are frequently Hufflepuff House.

See also Space-Filling Empire.

Examples:

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     Anime and Manga 

  • Valvrave the Liberator averts this by having three main nations-Jior, ARUS, and Dorsissa, but the latter two are superpowers, wheras Jior (where the protagonists are from) is a peaceful weaker nation.
  • Most iterations of Gundam, sometimes there are smaller neutral powers involved, but even they tend to be a collection of neutral powers allied together.
  • Code Geass has the world mostly divided up 1984-style between the EU, the Chinese Federation and the Holy Britannian Empire. Except Australia, for some reason.
  • Legend of the Galactic Heroes has the known galaxy divided between The Empire and The Alliance.
  • Xam'd Lost Memories seems to have things divided up between the Northern Government and a Southern alliance.
  • Last Exile also has two Superpower factions.

     Comic Books  

  • In the Marvel Universe, several tiny fictional micro-nations/city-states are considered superpowers due to their extremely advanced science and technology, monopoly over a form of Applied Phlebotinum, and resident superhero / villain heads of state. Other nations do not miss out either and several have their own secret research programmes designed to create or upgrade superhumans and their own resident team of superheroes.
    • Wakanda, a tiny African nation long hidden from the world, has had the cure for cancer for centuries and possesses the world's major source of Vibranium. Currently it is ruled by Emperor Scientist and all-round Bad Ass King T'Challa, aka the Black Panther, who serves on the world's premiere superhero team, and his weather manipulating Queen Storm of the X-Men, and has favourable ties to the Fantastic Four. This has changed in later years when Doctor Doom stole the stores of Vibranium and an attempt to retrieve it with the aid of the Fantastic Four, Wolverine, Colossus, Nightcrawler and Deadpool forced T'Challa to render a good 95% of it inert, followed by the events of Avengers vs. X-Men, which saw Wakanda ravaged by a Phoenix Force-empowered Namor and T'Challa annulling his marriage to Storm
    • The tiny East European country of Latveria goes even further- it is considered a superpower pretty much because of the fact it is ruled by Dr. Doom, an even greater Emperor Scientist than T'Challa, as well as a Sorcerous Overlord, which is so advanced that crime, poverty and disease have been totally eradicated and the country is policed by super-advanced robots of Doom's own design. It is so ridiculously advanced that VR simulations of a hypothetical war between Latveria and the United States- which bear in mind is even more advanced than its real-life counterpart thanks to a monopoly on superhumans amongst other things- has Lateria win every single time. This might have something to do with the fact that Doom has succesfully conquered the world already. Thrice (at least). And he surrendered it out of boredom.
      • One story hinged upon the fact that the only reason the US didn't officially recognise Latveria as a fellow superpower was Latveria's lack of political influence — both the US and the USSR (the story was written during the Cold War) were massive Federations with lots of alliances on their side and a stake on the UN pie, while Latveria was a single independent nation about the size of Singapore, albeit a single micronation capable of wiping out both federations from the map. Then Doom arranged things to establish an alliance between Atlantis and Latveria...
    • The tiny African island nation of Genosha used to be this, at least under Magneto, due to it being an open haven for the mutant species, meaning the vast majority of its population was comprised of superhumans, a bit of Laser-Guided Karma given that Genosha was formerly home to the worlds largest market for mutant slavery, and bear in mind Magneto obtained the island because he managed to single-handidly take the entire planets magnetic field hostage and could have caused global catastrophe on his own- the world offered it to him. We say used to because another X-Men villain, Xavier's Ax-Crazy Evil Twin Cassandra Nova, sent an army of Sentinel's to massacre 99.9% of the population, and it is currently an apocalyptic wasteland not really any good to anyone.
      • Magneto seems somewhat fond of this- he also created Avalon / Asteroid M, an asteroid above Earth that also was offered as a haven for the mutant race, this time backed up by Magneto stealing a whole bunch of nuclear weapons in case the world objected. Once again, this project failed due to the actions of another evil mutant.
      • Cyclops later ran with this idea, retrieving the fallen Asteroid M and rechristening it as "Utopia" as a place to keep the remaining mutants safe.

     Literature  

  • 1984, of course. All the world belongs to the three "superstates," Oceania, Eurasia, and Eastasia. All three are evil, and there's nothing to choose between them politically. Given that Oceania very rapidly switches which one it's fighting against and which one it's allied with, and the similarities between the supposedly opposing political systems, it is implied that the other two may not exist, or at the very least that the war between them is a sham. With the control that Oceania's government has over information, it's impossible to say one way or the other.
  • The post-WW2 world in Sterling's Draka-verse is divided between the American-led Alliance for Democracy and the Domination of Draka.
  • While not a political example, in Sergey Lukyanenko's The Stars Are Cold Toys, it's off-handedly mentioned that, after the invention of the jumper, most nations had working space programs. Just check how much even a single unmanned launch costs, not to mention all the R&D, equipment, and trained personnel that goes into a functional space program, and you'll know how ridiculous that sounds.

     Live Action TV  

  • In the earlier seasons of Stargate SG-1, only the most powerful countries are ever shown to know about the Stargate program. Russia learns about the American program first, soon followed by France, Britain, and China. Those five nations happen to be the five permanent members of the United Nations Security Council, but they appear to learn about (or suspect) the program independently. By the time of Stargate Atlantis, the Atlantis outpost is found in Antarctica, and all 46 signatory nations to the Antarctic Treaty learn the secret. The Atlantis Expedition is thus a truly multinational one, with representatives from nations such as the Czech Republic, Belgium, and Japan.
    • Jonas Quinn's homeworld Langara is dominated by the superpowers Kelowna, Tirania, and the Andari Federation.
  • Star Trek is constantly introducing new species, who control anything from a single planet to a full blown stellar empire. However, the Alpha Quadrant is effectively divided between the Federation, the Klingons and the Romulans with the Ferengi and Cardassians as major-minor players.

     Video Games  

  • Nuclear-war sim DEFCON does this with the world divided up into six equal powers. It works for game balance, but makes for frankly odd geopolitics: South America and Africa are united nuclear powers able to field bomber fleets, navies and ICBMs equal to North America or Russia. Then there's the rest-of-the-world Asian bloc, a unified empire of Japan, China, India, Pakistan, both Koreas, the entire Middle East and everything in between.
  • Due to the small number of powerful empires in Civilization-type games, most conflicts will be like this.
    • Civilization 5 introduces truly independent city-states, and for a change introduces incentives for allying with them if you should choose not to crush them.
  • In Valkyria Chronicles, there is only the Federation and the Empire, and the very tiny and peaceful grand duchy of Gallia, which is the only country still independent.
  • Averted in the Fire Emblem Tellius games, where Begnion takes up almost half the continent, with Crimea (the good guys) needing to curry Begnion's favour to defeat Daein (the bad guys, which are around the same size as Crimea but with a better military). There are also lots of smaller Laguz-run countries which don't pose much of a presence separately.
    • Most games feature a powerful evil empire, a few powerful good countries and a bunch of unimportant minor ones.
  • In the Advance Wars games there are four nations who live in relative peace with each other (Orange Star, Blue Moon, Yellow Comet, Green Earth). The presence of an apparently space-faring Black Hole nation disrupts this balance of power.

     Web Original  

  • In Ilivais X, the American continents are under control of the Aztec Empire, and the vast majority of the Eurasian continent and Africa are under the Iberian Empire. The Gaia Forces, a neutral zone mostly descended from the space colonies, is allowed a buffer section of Russia and the entirety of Australia.
  • In Pay Me, Bug!, there's The Alliance of Free Worlds, The Empire of the Radiant Throne, a collection of small "Free Trade Baronies" that only remain independent through economic power, and nothing else.
  • In the future arcs of S.S.D.D almost every nation is a member of, or at least allied with, either the CORE or the Collective of Anarchist States, including the pieces of the former USA. Though there are some minor independent nations mentioned, plus China, and California OW is owned by the Maytec Consortium which sells stuff to both superpowers.

     Real Life  

  • The world immediately before the First World War actually resembled this. The entire world was basically divided among a few great powers, and, with few exceptions, the remaining places the great powers did not hold direct control (China, Iran, and Central and South America) they still exercised effective control via treaties or other methods of influence: Britain, France, Germany, Russia, Austria, Italy, the Ottoman Empire, and the United States, with a few smaller empires: the Netherlands, Belgium, Portugal, and Japan. While that may seem like a long list, consider that there are close to two-hundred nations in the world today, and the world of 1914 was indeed a world of superpowers.
  • The term for this in political science is Multi-Polar System, although that does not quite mean that nations are superpowers per se, just that no one or two nations hold a monopoly on power. A world with two-nation superpowers is known as a Bi-Polar System, a la the Cold War, whereas a world with a single dominant superpower is known as a Uni-Polar world, a la the modern world with the United States, which is so powerful it is sometimes promoted to Hyperpower by some commentators. There is a general consensus that we are moving towards a Multi-Polar system again as nations like Brazil, India, Russia and China, and the European Union, gradually become economic centres in their own right, as opposed to the economic dominance of the US, although it will be decades before any of these come close to matching America in military power. A Bi-Polar world between America and China is unlikely since though China's economy is set to rival that of America's in the near future, they are also economically interdependant and though China is arguably the nearest miliary rival, there is still a chasm of difference between the two.


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