Literature: Wizards, Warriors and You

Wizards, Warriors and You is one of many Choose Your Own Adventure-style book series released in the 1980's. Basically the Wizard and the Warrior are the champions of the kingdom of Silvergate. There's a prologue in every book where they're presented with some daunting quest, and the reader decides whether to take it on as the Wizard or the Warrior.

The Wizard armed himself with the Book of Spells, and could use anything within it when the book allowed. The Warrior used the Book of Weapons; he could carry any three weapons from it in addition to the Sword of the Golden Lion, an indestructible blade forged by the same blacksmith who made Excalibur. Every six books the assortment of spells and weapons would change.

The success of spells or battles were determined by such methods as flipping a coin, what time of day the book was being read, or picking a random number. While this lent a somewhat bizarre feeling to the books at times, Wizards, Warriors and You lasted for 18 books.


Wizards, Warriors and You provides examples of the following tropes:

  • Artistic License Animal Care: R.L. Stine doesn't know you don't given chicken bones to dogs.
  • Badass Long Robe: The Wizard wears one.
  • Bling-Bling-BANG!: One book begins with a wandering knight challenging the castle's champion (the Warrior). The knight's armor and shield are solid gold, which is immediately noted as a disturbing choice of metal, both due to its weight and softness - a strong sign the knight is not a mortal man. (Indeed, she's currently neither.)
  • Cain and Abel: The Big Bad in the Wizard's path through the second book is his evil brother Warrick.
  • Dinosaurs Are Dragons: Not in the sense that dinosaurs breathe fire (they do run into a dinosaur in one book, but it's just a regular dinosaur), but that in The Dragon Queen's Revenge the Wizard and Warrior fight an army of dragons that, according to the illustrations, are just t-rexes with wings.
  • Distressed Damsel: Two books were about saving Princess Saralinda from danger, though for what it's worth she does appear a few times in a non-distressed role too. At least, no more distressed than the rest of the kingdom.
  • Epic Flail: One of the Warrior's weapons in later books is a flail with three chains and three heads.
  • Hell: Well, it's called the Cavern of the Phantoms, but it's where bad people go when they die in these books.
  • Inventory Management Puzzle: The Warrior usually has the option of carrying three additional weapons with him along with his Sword of the Golden Lion. The trick is that in some titles, you need the correct weapons in order to advance or even win. For example, in the Imposter King, if you're not carrying the Cutlass of Cornwall when the ghost of the Warrior's father visits you, he locks you in a room where you're eventually found and killed.
  • Killer Rabbit: The evil Mirror Universe has killer squirrels.
  • King Arthur: The Arthurian mythos figure into a bunch of the books. There's the appropriately-titled Ghost Knights of Camelot, the origin of the Warrior's sword, and Merlin's an advisor to the Wizard.
  • Loophole Abuse: The Wizard's most directly offensive spell, Merlin's Fire, can't be cast on living things. In one book (during the Warrior's path) he gets around this by first using another spell on his opponent to turn them into a flammable object, then using Merlin's fire on them.
  • Mirror Universe: Invaders from Darkland.
  • Our Giants Are Bigger: They have two hearts and must be killed twice.
  • Our Zombies Are Different: They're intelligent and can't be destroyed. But they can be incapacitated or fooled.
  • Persona Non Grata: During the Impostor King, both the Wizard and the Warrior are banished from the kingdom. They are also warned that if they have not left within one hour, they would get killed on sight. Guess what was one of the possible endings to this adventure.
  • The Power of Friendship: In the Warrior's route through The Haunted Castle of Ravencurse, when they get up to the front gates an evil knight rushes out and knocks the Wizard unconscious. He claims only a magical mace inside the castle can hurt him. You can run and get the mace and have a hard fight on your hands. Or you can refuse to abandon your helpless companion, and such a display of loyalty vanquishes your mighty foe on the spot.