Literature / Wings of Fire
aka: The Dragonet Prophecy

"Five eggs to hatch on Brightest Night. Five Dragons born to end the fight. Darkness will rise to bring the light. The Dragonets are coming..."

A 2012 series of books written by Tui Sutherland, a member of the Erin Hunter team. The series follows a group of young dragons who are the centre of a prophecy, which states they will end the war that has engulfed their world in chaos, the Dragonets of Destiny. Each book focuses on one member The first book, The Dragonet Prophecy, was released in 2012 and details the dragonets' training with the Talons of Peace and abrupt introduction to the war. The second book, The Lost Heir, released in January, 2013, chronicles their ongoing search for their parents following the revelation that one of their members is a princess who was stolen from her parents. The third book, The Hidden Kingdom, follows their attempt to escape the war by retreating into neutral Rainwing territory, only to be forced back into the war. The fourth book, The Dark Secret, focuses on Starflight being abducted by The NightWings to see if he's worthy of the prophecy. The fifth, The Brightest Night, focuses on Sunny's efforts to put an end to the war once and for all.

A second series is currently ongoing. The first book is Moon Rising. It focused on an entirely new character and her quest to find.theNightWings's homeland. The second is Winter Turning, with the main character being Winter, the third is Escaping Peril which is about Peril, and the fourth is called Talons of Power from the perspective of Turtle.

There is a series a E-Books called Winglets exploring the backstories of side characters. The first is called Prisoners from Fierceteeth's perspective, and the second is called Assassin and it is about Deathbringer. A third winglet called Deserter, which is about Six-claws, is set to come out.

Needs love and Wiki Magic.

Please add all new character tropes to the Character Sheet.

This series provides examples of:

  • After-Action Healing Drama: After Moon, Winter, Qibli, and Kinkajou's fight with Chameleon and The Reveal that Pyrite is actually Hailstorm, the dragonets then have to fly to Possibility to get medical treatment for the gravely injured Kinkajou.
  • Alien Blood: IceWing blood is blue.
  • Alien Sky: Pyrrhia has three moons.
  • Aliens Never Invented the Wheel: The NightWings are the most technologically and scientifically advanced tribe and know about things like desalinization, genetics and germ theory, but they apparently never invented glass, considering the impractical device Mastermind makes to shield the eyes from RainWing venom.
  • All Love Is Unrequited: In the first arc, Fatespeaker is in love with Starflight, who is in love with Sunny. In the second series, Umber is suggested to have a crush on Qibli, who is suggested to have a crush on Moonwatcher. Winter also has a crush on Moonwatcher, and Kinkajou has a crush on Winter, and Turtle has an implied crush on Kinkajou.
  • Ancient Artifact: Animus-touched objects.
  • And I Must Scream: After Darkstalker loses the bracelet, he is trapped underground without his animus powers, fully conscious but unable to escape.
  • An Ice Person: The IceWing dragons breathe a freezing mist instead of fire.
  • Animal Assassin: In "The Brightest Night", Blister tries to use venomous dragonbite vipers, which she given Burn as a gift, to kill her. Burn never takes them, but in the peace meeting that the dragonets of destiny organize, she tries to give the snakes to Burn instead. Burn tries to kill Blister with one of the snakes, but ends up dead instead because she doesn't realize that they are two.
  • Aristocrats Are Evil: Just look at the character sheet. Nearly every single queen is The Caligula.
  • Arson, Murder, and Jaywalking: The dragonets dislike Blister because she killed Kestrel, she's creepy and manipulative and, in Sunny's case, because she called her sweet.
  • Artifact Title: The title "Wings of Fire", which references a line in the original prophecy, isn't relevant for the second arc.
  • Attack the Tail: All dragons have a weak point on their tail. Dragons often attack it in battle.
  • Axes at School: The plot of "Moon Rising" involves a dragon flame cactus being set off in Jade Mountain Academy's history cave, and Moon trying to find out who did it. This later escalates to the same dragon who set the bomb trying to throw a stalactite on her intended target, and said target trying to kill all of the founders and battling Moon and Qibli, who try to stop her.
  • Babies Ever After: Darkstalker sends Moon a vision of the future that invokes this trope for the original Dragonets of Destiny except Sunny.
  • Bad Powers, Bad People: Some NightWings can infect prey with bacteria by biting them, slowly killing them, but it's almost entirely antagonistic NightWings who have that power. Justified because the reason the NightWings can do this is that they adjusted to eating rotten food in the volcano, and the whole reason they are behind some reprehensible acts is to escape from the volcano. Starlight and other NightWings on the dragonets' side were either raised outside the NightWing island or they have been away for long enough both to lose that ability and develop rebellious opinions.
  • Bad Powers, Good People: Peril's character arc in "Escaping Peril" involves realizing that her powers don't make her evil, her actions do. In the same book, Winter balks at releasing Darkstalker due to his "horrible powers", only to be reminded that those powers are the same as Moonwatcher's and Turtle's powers.
  • Battle in the Rain: The battle between Scarlet and Ruby/Tourmaline.
  • Beastly Bloodsports: Queen Scarlet forces other dragons (and occasionally humans) to fight each other in a pit, gladiator-style.
  • Big Screwed-Up Family: The SeaWing royal family. Queen Coral neglects her many sons and is overprotective of her daughters, she killed her oldest daughter in a challenge who made a Living Statue to kill her sisters in the egg, her oldest surviving daughter, Tsunami, killed her father without knowing it was him, one of her daughters may or may not be going insane due to her animus powers, the dragon she wants her daughter to marry wants to kill the oldest for being annoyingly rebellious, and wants to marry her newborn daughter instead, and her niece is so loyal to her that she literally cleans up the brains of dragons she tortured to death for letting one of her daughters die.
  • Boarding School: Jade Mountain Academy.
  • Body Horror: The extremely graphic descriptions of whatRainWing venom does to Dragons. Especially Queen Scarlet, who survived a venom strike and is described as having her face almost entirely melted off, to the point were part of her skull was exposed.
    • The physical condition of Queen Battlewinner of the NightWings in Book 4. During a battle with an IceWing, the freezing breath of the IceWing went down her throat and began to freeze her from the inside out. She has to stay in a cauldron of lava in order to balance out her body temperature, and the very act of talking causes the ice inside her to shatter and puncture her throat.
  • Cain and Abel: The three SandWing sisters, Winter and Icicle, Orca and all of her siblings, posthumously...
  • Career-Ending Injury: Averted. Starflight is blinded in Book 4, making it seem like his days of reading scrolls are over, but Book 6 shows him reading by touch from carved stone slabs instead. Played straight with Osprey, who can't guard his Dragon Hoard and has to move into the main SkyWing kingdom after a scavenger paralyzes his tail and makes him unable to fly.
  • Catch a Falling Star: Clay catches Tsunami after she falls from an Inevitable Waterfall while unable to fly due to a dislocated shoulder. Later on, Tsunami catches Webs when he falls from the canopy of the Summer Palace.
  • Cave Behind the Falls: The cave that the dragonets originally live in turns out to be one.
  • Challenging the Chief: All dragon tribes' queens ( Except for the Rainwings') are decided when one of her daughters, sisters, or nieces challenges her for the throne, and kills her in combat. The series' plot kicks off when the SandWing queen is killed by a human, leaving her three daughters to go at war over which of them most deserves the throne.
  • Character Development: Each dragonet goes through it in their particular books.
  • Chekhov's Gun: Turtle's random river rock turns out to have healing powers, which he uses to save Winter's life, also revealing that Turtle is an animus.
  • Chekhov's Volcano: The Night Wings live in a volcano, which they resident Mad Scientist Mastermind says will erupt in a few years. However, it ends up erupting at the end of "The Dark Secret".
  • The Chessmaster: Blister, Morrowseer and Queen Battlewinner.
  • Child Soldiers: The SkyWings, MudWings, and IceWings all use them.
  • The Chosen Ones: The Dragonets and they aren't very enthusiastic about it. It turns out the prophecy was made up by the NightWings as part of a complicated plan to secure a new home in the RainWings' jungle, due to their island being slowly destroyed by an erupting volcano.
  • Class Trip: The dragonets talk about having class trips to the various kingdoms for Jade Mountain Academy students.
  • Climactic Volcano Backdrop: The climax of "The Dark Secret".
  • Comet of Doom: Inverted. The appearance of a comet when there are two full moons makes it look like another Brightest Night, which dragons consider a good omen for the peace meeting at the end of "The Brightest Night".
  • Coming-of-Age Story: Each book follows dragons who would be considered teenagers in human years maturing and finding their purpose in life.
  • Convection Schmonvection: No dragons are actually injured by lava or Peril's fire without being touched by it. However, dragons are noted to have a resistance to fire in general, and don't die as quickly as humans would even when they actually touch lava.
  • Cool Gate: Stonemover created portals that connect the Rain, Sand, and Night kingdoms.
  • Curtains Match the Window: Most dragon tribes often have eyes that match their scale color (MudWings have orange or brown eyes, SkyWings can have orange eyes, SeaWings have green or blue eyes, IceWings have blue eyes, NightWings often have black eyes). Averted with Sand Wings, who have white or pale gold scales but black, pupil less eyes.
  • Death from Above: SkyWings tend to use this in war, dropping dragonflame cactus bombs from above.
  • Distant Prologue: All of the prologues so far of the second arc - the one for "Moon Rising" takes place four years ago, "Winter Turning" is two years ago, and "Escaping Peril" is seven years ago. In the first arc, the prologue for "The Dragonet Prophecy" takes place six years ago, which due to a Time Skip is just days after the "Escaping Peril" prologue, and the prologue of "The Brightest Night" takes place twenty years ago.
  • Either/Or Prophecy: The Jade Mountain prophecy. Either Jade Mountain will be destroyed or the Lost City of Night will be found.
  • Egg Macguffin: The prologue of the first book features the guardians trying to steal the five prophecy eggs in time for the Brightest Night.
  • Emergency Transformation: When Queen Ruby is about to be killed by Queen Scarlet, Peril intervenes upon realizing that Chameleon has somehow limited Ruby's power. It ends up transforming her into an entirely different dragon, though, healing her injuries and allowing her to win the battle.
  • Enemy Civil War: Between the SandWing queens and their allies.
  • Epunymous Title: The first three books of the second arc are this. "Talons of Power" breaks the pattern, probably because it's hard to make "Turtle" work with anything this way.
  • Evil Mentor: It's clear from the beginning that Morrowseer is not a nice guy, but how bad he is never really sinks in until much later.
  • Evil Versus Evil: All three Sandwing heirs are equally despicable, and even the leaders of the Talons of Peace are jerks. (In fact, the Big Good is an unapologetic racist.) The Talons get even worse when they decide to replace Glory and a few of the original dragonets with Flame and some false dragonets because they felt the originals are inadequate.
  • Eye Scream: A frequent injury in the series. Fjord and Crocodile are both killed by Rain Wing venom striking their eyes, Flame is blinded in one eye during a skirmish, and Starflight is blinded completely after being hit by a fireball.
  • Fantastic Racism: All over the place. All other tribes hate the RainWings, seeing them as lazy and useless. SeaWings hate MudWings and try to kill them on sight, IceWings and NightWings completely hate each other due to events that happened 2000 years ago, after the events of the first series SeaWings hate SkyWings and NightWings are hated by all of the tribes, besides having a mutually very tense relationship with the RainWings. And that's just the most prominent examples. MudWings are stereotyped as idiots, SkyWings are stereotyped as perpetually grumpy, IceWings are stereotyped as arrogant, SandWings are stereotyped as treasure-obsessed backstabbers, etc.
  • Fantasy World Map: There's one of Pyrrhia at the beginning of every book.
  • Feminist Fantasy: Many of the main characters are female, and are very competent.
  • Fighting for a Homeland: The Night Wings' actions are motivated by looking for a new home, since their old one is about to be destroyed by the volcano and is already miserable to live in. They are still the villains, because finding a new home for them involves killing all of the RainWings.
  • Foreign Queasine: The NightWings eat prey that is already rotted before it dies, thanks to the bacteria in their fangs. It is deadly to dragons who aren't used to it, even other NightWings, and most other dragons are unsurprisingly disgusted.
  • Four Philosophy Ensemble:
    • The Cynic: Glory
    • The Optimist: Sunny
    • The Realist: Tsunami
    • The Apathetic: Starflight
    • The Conflicted: Clay
  • Gender Is No Object: Played with. Only females can rule the tribes, but for most dragons who aren't royal, gender is a non-issue.
  • Genius Ditz: The RainWing healers are described as giving completely useless advice for most healing, but being total experts in injuries that happen often in the rainforest.
  • Gladiator Games: Queen Scarlet loves them.
  • Great Offscreen War: We never get to see what conflict the RainWings were fighting in during Grandeur's early rule.
  • Genius Cripple: Starflight, after being blinded.
  • Handy Helper: After being blinded in book four, Starflight receives assistance from Tamarin - a blind dragoness who teaches him how to get around and fly without sight - and Fatespeaker, who promises to stay with him and read to him until they can find a way he can read on his own.
  • Hero of Another Story: A dark variation happens with the replacement dragonets. They consider themselves the heroes of the story, and when they find out they're not, and the "main" dragonets find out that they were expendable and easily replaceable all along, it leads to a lot of arguments and confusion.
  • Hidden Depths: Each of the dragonets possesses them, and each dragonet's book is dedicated to exploring the depths of their character. While the other books show them as their friends perceive them, their book shows them as they are.
  • Hidden Elf Village: The RainWings' village, which is isolated from all other dragon tribes.
  • Hold Your Hippogriffs: 'Three moons', and ‘moons’ is a common exclamation of frustration.
  • Humanity's Wake: Takes place more than 5,000 years after humans were replaced by dragons as the dominant species of Pyrrhia.
  • Human Pet: Some of the SandWings keep human pets, as does Winter. Those who do actually tend to think of "scavengers" as rather adorable.
  • Human Popsicle: The fate of the IceWings who lose the Diamond Trial, as well as Foeslayer when she isn't being killed over and over again by the dragons in the trial, until she is freed by Winter.
  • Humans by Any Other Name: Humans are called ‘Scavengers’.
  • Ice Palace: The IceWings have one, enchanted by an animus dragon to never melt.
  • Idiosyncratic Episode Naming: The second arc's pattern is "(protagonist) (x)ing", sometimes "(x)ing (protagonist)". This is changed in "Talons of Power".
  • I Know You Know I Know: In The Brightest Night, Burn receives a gift from Blister, which she easily guesses contains a deadly Dragonbite Viper, and so she quickly dispatches the Viper inside. Turns out that Blister anticipated this and put two Vipers in the box so the second would kill Burn.
  • Inadequate Inheritor: Queen Grandeur completely changes the line of RainWing succession because her children are all lazy and would make horrible rulers.
  • Incendiary Exponent: Most of the dragons can breathe fire (except the Seawings and Icewings, the former breathing underwater, while the latter breathes a freezing mist. RainWings have no Breath Weapon at all. Turns out they can spit a corrosive venom.
  • Inevitable Waterfall: In "The Dragonet Prophecy", when Clay and Tsunami are traveling through the underground river, Tsunami goes over a very small waterfall and pranks Clay into thinking it is much larger. But then it turns out that there really is a large waterfall beyond that one.
  • In Medias Res: "The Brightest Night" starts right before the eruption of the NightWings' volcano, replaying the last bits of "The Dark Secret" and then having Sunny kidnapped by Fierceteeth, Strongwings and Preyhunter.
  • In Love with the Mark: Deathbringer, towards Glory, who tries to hide the fact that she likes him back.
  • Instant Awesome, Just Add Dragons: The Series.
  • Involuntary Battle to the Death: Scarlet forces dragons to fight in the arena. Not always this trope, considering some of them are dragons who were originally on opposite sides of the war. But it culminates in making Clay and Peril fight, which is definitely this trope. Anyone who tries to talk their opponents out of it ends up getting a nasty fate like, in Gill's case, being dehydrated into insanity.
  • It Sucks to Be the Chosen One: All of the dragonets go through this in various ways. Glory, the one dragon who isn't The Chosen One, even outright states it to Deathbringer, who notes that he's never thought about it that way.
  • Just a Kid: Adults often tell the Dragonets of Destiny that they are just dragonets, so they can't possibly have any impact or make their own choices.
  • Kid Hero: All of the protagonist so far. Even Fierceteeth would not be considered adult by NightWing standards (she is eight years old, while NightWings are allowed to leave the island at 10 years old), though she would by the standards of other tribes like IceWings.
  • Knockout Ambush: At the beginning of "The Hidden Kingdom", the dragonets and Webs are ambushed by RainWings who knock all of them out with tranquilizer darts except Starflight and Glory.
  • La Résistance: The Talons of Peace have brought the five dragonets together to help end the war. Needless to say, it doesn't end well.
  • Lesser of Three Evils: The dragonets are supposed to choose between the three royal SandWing sisters for queen, but none of them are very good choices. Burn is Ax-Crazy and does things For the Evulz, Blister is a completely pitiless and emotionless Manipulative Bastard who engineered the war to become queen over the physically stronger Burn, and Blaze is Lethally Stupid and would clearly be a very incompetent queen. Initially, after meeting Burn for the first time, they decide that they definitely don't want her. But by The Brightest Night, they differ in their opinions as to who's the better one. Tsunami prefers Burn because she's more powerful than Blaze and won't try to betray them like Blister was, Glory prefers Blister because she's the most intelligent and not pointlessly evil, while Clay prefers Blaze because she's the kindest of the three.
  • Like Brother and Sister: The five dragonets tend to view each other this way. Except for Starflight over Sunny. And it's part of why Sunny ultimately turns him down: Their relationship is just too familial.
  • Living Statue: Unbeknownst to Queen Coral, her eldest daughter Orca possessed animus magic as well as a talent for sculpting and had "programmed" the statue she made in the Royal Hatchery to kill all female heirs before they hatched. This was done to eliminate the competition to Orca's reign, but also worked as a way to spite her mother from beyond the grave when Orca lost the duel for the crown.
  • Love Triangle: With Starflight, Sunny and Fatespeaker. Starflight loves Sunny, while Fatespeaker loves Starflight. In the fifth book, Sunny ultimately turns Starflight down because she loves him like a brother, and pushes him towards Fatespeaker, who he's been growing closer to.
  • Loyal Phlebotinum: The Eye of Onyx only lets the dragon it chooses to be the rightful queen wear it, and explodes any other dragons.
  • Luke, I Am Your Father: Tsunami, upon entering the Kingdom of the Seawings, learns that her father was Gill, the crazed, dehydrated Seawing she was forced to kill in Queen Scarlet's arena.Sunny also gets this twice in "The Brightest Night", with Thorn revealing both that she is her mother and later on that Stonemover is her father. Later Soar/Chameleon tells Peril that he is her father. Peril is not particularly excited.
  • MacGuffin Title: Part three of "The Brightest Night" is called "The Eye of Onyx", referring to the piece of SandWing treasure that has the power to end the war, which Sunny looks for throughout the book.
  • Machiavelli Was Wrong: Kestrel believes that dragons don't have empathy for each other, which leads to Sunny and Starlight combining their fire to free Tsunami when she is tied up, which Kestrel had discounted as a possibility.
  • The Magic Goes Away: Animus dragons, who have the ability to enchant objects, have disappeared thousands of years ago in all tribes except the SeaWings and NightWings.
  • Matriarchy: The dragon tribes are all ruled by queens.
  • Matricide: How queens usually come into power.
  • Mind over Matter: A basic enchantment for an animus dragon.
  • A Minor Kidroduction: All of the prologues for the second series are this - "Moon Rising"'s prologue features Moon's hatching, "Winter Turning"'s prologue features a three-year-old Winter, and we get to see one-year old Peril in "Escaping Peril"'s prologue.
  • Multi Volume Work: There are 10 planned books, plus Winglets and an extra-length book about Darkstalker.
  • Names to Run Away from Really Fast: The NightWings are particular experts at this. Vengeance, Slaughter, Deathbringer, Darkstalker, Foeslayer, etc. The other tribes also have dragons with names like Tsunami, Crocodile, and Viper. Not all of them are evil, though.
  • Neck Snap: Several dragons kill other dragons this way.
  • Odd Name Out: The six Queens of the RainWings are called Splendor, Magnificent, Dazzling, Exquisite, Grandeur...and Fruit Bat. Lampshaded in story.
  • Once per Episode: The protagonist sees one or more scavengers and decides to rescue them rather than kill them {except in "The Dark Secret").
  • One-Word Title: Prisoners and "Assassin''.
  • Our Dragons Are Different: And how! There are seven species of dragons, each with their own unique attributes and abilities.
  • Outrunning the Fireball: After the NightWings' volcano erupts. Justified due to the dragons' natural resistance to fire and the fact that they're going through a portal, so the fireball is only coming through a very narrow passageway. And Starflight still gets blinded and nearly killed.
  • Perfect Pacifist People: The RainWings before Glory's rule.
  • Persecution Flip: the NightWings capture RainWings to experiment on and starve, as part of their final plan that involves killing all of them, which most of them don't feel guilty enough due to Fantastic Racism. They later end up being ruled by a RainWing, subject to Fantastic Racism themselves by RainWings and others, and generally treated as second-class citizens, though Glory is reasonable and tries to integrate them into society despite the minefield of tension between the two tribes she rules.
  • Polar Bears and Penguins: All of the kingdoms contain animals from their respective biomes regardless of what part of the real world they are found in. This means there are both polar bears and penguins in the Ice Kingdom.
  • Powered by a Forsaken Child: Blister's "secret weapon" is Anemone, Coral's one year old animus dragonet. She plans to use her animus powers to win the war, even though it will make her lose her soul.
  • Prophecies Are Always Right: The first series revolves around the five dragonets who are prophesied to end the war. Subverted, since Morrowseer actually made up the prophecy as part of his plan to have the NightWings take over the rainforest to escape their home]].
  • Prophecies Rhyme All the Time: Both the prophecy about the dragonets and Moonwatcher's prophecy.
  • Protagonist Title: The upcoming "Darkstalker", though he is an alternating POV with Fathom and Clearsight.
  • Psychic Block Defense: The effect of skyfire.
  • Psycho Electric Eel: Coral has a prison where no dragons dare escape because of eels with shocks powerful enough to kill a dragon. There is water flowing from the ceiling so even flying out would be risky. Justified by how all Pyrrhian animals and plants are larger than ones on Earth to be more "dragon sized".
  • Quicksand Sucks: The RainWings don't have any prisons, since they typically exile offenders. As a result, when Mastermind is held prisoner for experimenting on the RainWings, they put him in quicksand and drag him out and then back in every few hours so he doesn't die.
  • Race Name Basis: Several dragons refer to others by their tribe's name.
  • Rebellious Rebel: Neither the Dragonets of Destiny nor some of the Talons of Peace accept the organization's decisons.
  • Rewriting Reality: Darkstalker's scroll works exactly like an animus dragon's magic does, because he put all of his powers into it, and is activated by writing in it.
  • Ridiculously Cute Critter: RainWings think sloths are this. Scavengers also, Glory notes upon seeing this that she can see why people like them, since they look like slightly less furry sloths.
  • Royal School: Since there are only 35 students at Jade Mountain academy (5 per tribe) and all of them are selected by their queens, quite a few are royalty, as are some of the founders.
  • Royalty Superpower: SeaWing royals have extra bioluminescent scales and are often animus dragons. IceWing royalty used to have animus powers due to marrying whatever animus was born in another family, until 2000 years ago.
  • Ship Tease: Just about all of the dragonets have this in their stories; Clay with Peril, Tsunami with Riptide and Glory with Deathbringer. Starflight initially loves Sunny, but it's one-sided and she pushes him towards Fatespeaker, who already loved him, and who he had faint feelings for.
  • Sliding Scale of Animal Communication: Level 2, as the dragons can communicate with each other, and the humans present are treated as prey at worst and pets at best.
  • Sliding Scale Of Free Will Versus Fate: Level 4, because while prophecies do exist, they are just predictions of one of many futures and dragons still have free will. Though skilled Seers like Darkstalker can know every single future and their odds, it is the individual dragon's choice which future will happen.
  • Snakes Are Sinister: Queen Blister, one of the major villains, is described as having a snakelike face and later uses venomous snakes to try to kill Burn. Both dragons named after snakes, Viper and Rattlesnake, are antagonists.
  • The Sociopath: Most of the adult dragons, even those on the heroes' side, say that dragons are not supposed to feel empathy for others. (Though this is probably just propaganda to justify the war, since the dragonets are able to show empathy just fine.)
  • Song of Courage: Clay gets Queen Scarlet's prisoners who are about to be killed to sing the "Dragonets are coming" song.
  • Snow Means Cold: All dragon tribes besides NightWings have names based on their environment. IceWings live in an area with very cold temperatures, and some have names involving snow (and there's even a dragon named Hailstorm).
  • Standard Evil Empire Hierarchy: For Blister's side of the war:
  • Stronger with Age: Dragons get larger and thus more powerful as they get older, and RainWings can also shoot venom farther.
  • Succession Crisis: The SandWings are having one throughout the first series that turns into a world war. The MudWings are mentioned to have had one a few centuries ago.
  • Surprisingly Happy Ending: The first arc, where first it looks like Clay is going to die and then that Blister is going to win, but Peril heals Clay and Thorn becomes queen instead.
  • Tap on the Head: The other NightWings] use this to knock Starlight unconscious to bring to [[spoiler: their island. He remains semi-conscious for days with no long-term affects. Later in a flashback, Ruby has Hailstorm knocked out this way.
  • The "The" Title: The first five books.
  • Time Skip: Six months pass between the first arc and the second arc.
  • Title Drop: In "The Brightest Night", twice near the end of the book. First Clay says that Peril might really be the Wings of Fire, then Sunny, responding to Clay's statement with the knowledge that the prophecy is false, says the wings of fire are in all of the dragonets of destiny. And then there's how the Eye of Onyx is mentioned to look a lot like wings of fire.
  • Trailers Always Spoil: Nearly every book's back cover blurb contains a major spoiler for the previous book. "The Lost Heir" reveals that Tsunami is Queen Coral's only surviving daughter, "The Hidden Kingdom" reveals that Glory is venomous, "The Dark Secret" reveals that the NightWings were the ones responsible for kidnapping fourteen RainWings, "The Brightest Night" reveals that Morrowseer made up the prophecy, and "Winter Turning" reveals that Hailstorm is alive
  • Tranquilizer Dart: The RainWings use these.
  • Transformation Trinket: Chameleon uses Darkstalker's scroll as this. It is capable of doing much more, but he keeps the full extent of its power secret.
  • Tree Top Town: The RainWings live in one, unsurprisingly given that they are large, flying animals that live in the rainforest.
  • Triumphant Reprise: Near the beginning of "The Dragonet Prophecy", Tsunami sings the "dragonets are coming" song to annoy her guardians, which Clay notes that she does often. Later in the book, Clay, in despair at being imprisoned by the SkyWings, sings the song and the other prisoners join in. This serves as a moment of affirmation for Clay and the audience that the dragonets do mean something to the world.
  • Underwater City: The SeaWings live in one, unsurprisingly.
  • The Unfavorite: Glory is this to the Talons of Peace, on account of the fact that she's not a Skywing (as the prophecy demands) and was a last-minute replacement. In fact, the guardians and Morrowseer threatening to outright kill Glory is what incites the other dragonets to finally try to escape.
  • Vagueness Is Coming: The Jade Mountain prophecy, which ominously states that "something is coming", but doesn't say anything about what it is.
  • Veganopia: RainWings are the only vegetarian tribe, and eat only fruit. They live in a utopian village with no real threats until the NightWings show up.
  • Velvet Revolution: Sunny plans on ending the war this way, with a peace meeting between the tribes. It works, but not without two of the three queens dying anyway. A book earlier, the battle between the RainWings and NightWings, which has been set up to be potentially very bloody, is resolved relatively peacefully with only two deaths due to a combination of Sunny's suggestion to use tranquilizer darts to incapacitate the NightWing guards, Greatness peacefully agreeing to Abdicate the Throne, and the erupting volcano forcing the NightWings' hands.
  • Vitriolic Best Buds: The dragonets themselves at times, especially where Tsunami and Glory are concerned. They may in-fight a lot—well, OK, all the time—but they are nonetheless fiercely loyal to one another.
    • Sadly averted with the replacement dragonets, who strongly dislike one another, and show little concern when any of their number are in peril.
  • Volcano Lair: The NightWings live in one. Living there has all of the problems one would expect from living in an active volcano, though, so they are desperate to leave and find a better home.
  • Wanted Poster: Thorn posts one in the Scorpion's Den featuring Dune, Morrowseer and Stonemover.
  • War Is Hell: The dragonets get to see the utter horror of a pointless war filled with Family-Unfriendly Violence and death. Highlights include Queen Scarlet making her prisoners fight in arenas, which culminates for the "winners" in Peril burning them alive, the dragonets coming across a battlefield full of mutilated dead bodies from Burn and Blaze's sides (one of the casualties being Clay's sister Crane), the SkyWings bombing the summer palace, and Burn's side planning to lead an attack to kill all of the IceWings with the full knowledge of the dragons involved, including Child Soldiers, that a fight in such cold temperatures will likely nearly kill off every single tribe involved.
  • We Have Forgotten the Phlebotinum: The war would have already been over a long time ago if the Eye of Onyx hadn't been lost along with the other SandWing treasure.
  • When the Planets Align: The brightest night that the dragonets were born on refers to the day when all three moons are full. It only occurs about every century [[spoiler:though the end of the book "The Brightest Night" features a fake brightest night caused by two full moons and a comet.
  • Win Your Freedom: Queen Scarlet's arena is like this in theory - but anyone trying for freedom has to get past Peril first.
  • Women Are Wiser: It is noted that the female scavengers tend to live longer in the arena because they tend to be more clever and work together.
  • A World Half Full: Pyrrhia is full of plenty of horror and sadness, and the grudges that dragons and tribes hold against each other don't easily go away, but dragons are still capable of slowly working towards a better world.
  • World of Action Girls: All of the queens by definition, given how they gain power. And, in general, most female dragons are competent to great at fighting. Even female scavengers are action girls.
  • World of Badass: Dragons are expected to be powerful fighters, and most of them are.
  • World of Snark: There are many, many Deadpan Snarker characters running around.
  • X Must Not Win: In "The Brightest Night", when it seems like the war is about to end, the dragonets are motivated to still try to do something about how Blister will win.

Alternative Title(s): The Dragonet Prophecy, The Wings Of Fire