Literature: The Golden Goose

The Golden Goose is a German Fairy Tale collected by The Brothers Grimm.

A man had three sons, and the youngest was a fool, and continually abused. One day, the older two sons went to cut wood, and were rude with a little old man who asked to share their food, and both of them cut themselves so badly they had to return home. The youngest asked to go, too, and shared his food. The old man pointed him to a tree to chop down, and he found a goose whose feathers were gold in its roots when he did. The youngest son took it with him to an inn where he stayed the night. One of the innkeeper's daughters tried to steal a feather, and was stuck to it; her two sisters tried as well, and were stuck to her. The youngest son set out the next day, and the girls had to run to keep up with him. The parson chided them for their antics, and grabbed hold, and then he was stuck as well; the sexton tried to rebuke him, and ended up as well.

The youngest son went to city where a princess lived, who was so serious she never laughed, and the king had decreed that she should marry whoever made her laugh. The sight of the procession made her laugh, and so the youngest son married her and inherited the kingdom.

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