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Literature: Micro
Micro is a 2011 science fiction, adventure, techno-thriller novel written by Michael Crichton. This was the final novel he wrote before his death in 2008. He hadn't finished it before that time, but Richard Preston was chosen to finish the story, and he made use of Crichton's remaining notes and research to do this.

Vin Drake is the president of a mysterious scientific research company called Nanigen. He invites seven graduate students researching aspects of biology, including insects and beetles, to the company's headquarters in Hawaii. One of the students, Peter, finds out that his brother was a Nanigen director and that he died in a mysterious boating accident. Suspicious, Peter does some investigating and discovers that Vin Drake and Nanigen are responsible for his brother's death. Vin Drake actually tries to kill Peter for snooping around and ends up confessing to the murder for everyone to hear. Now the students end by being shrunk to a small size by a Tensor generator and they must find a way to get back to their normal size as well as take down Vin Drake.


This book provides examples of:

  • Accidental Public Confession: As Vin Drake tries to kill Peter, he happily confesses to murdering Peter's brother. Then he realizes that Peter was wearing a microphone connected to Nanigen's speaker system. This kicks off the entire plot.
  • Affably Evil: Vin Drake is calm, generous, friendly, and calmly disarms Rick's anti-corporate ranting...
    • Faux Affably Evil: ...Up until Peter reveals his plot to the other crew, in which he becomes a sleazebag degenerate with an Evil Laugh.
  • Anti-Villain: Strangely enough, the two mercenaries under Vin Drake's payroll. He lies to them, saying they're saboteurs from a corporate rival. They're professional and don't really taunt the heroes during their fight.
  • Author Tract: A recurring Crichton moral is that nature is nasty.
    • Danny Minot is one big Take That at science studies, psychology, and philosophy. This may be from the influence of Richard Preston, who is harder on soft sciences than Crichton was.
  • Big Bad: Vin Drake
  • Bury Your Gays: Jenny Linn is stated to "play for the other team". She is the first one killed out of the entire student group by a flash flood, not including the engineer from Nanigen who is eaten by ants.
  • Corrupt Corporate Executive: Vin Drake: egotistical, extremely confident that he'll change the world (and he just might), and views any threat at not getting all the profit with violent hatred and believes that Murder Is the Best Solution to said threats.
  • Deadly Euphemism: When Vin Drake assembles his security team to track down the students, he asks his Head of Security that security is forming a "rescue party" to "recover" the students. The only reason this succeeds is because security is under the impression they're corporate spies, not students in the wrong place in the wrong time trying to escape Vin.
  • Fatal Family Photo: A "I want to go home and see my wife and kids" variant. An engineer tricked into starting the Tensor core to shrink the students talks about trying to get home before he catches the micro-bends and dies, because he's got a family. He is the first casualty in the entire group, disturbing soldier ants from a bullet ant colony, who promptly tear him to shreds.
  • Hard On Soft Science: Danny Minot, a sniveling, pretentious "science studies" major who works in studying "paradigms" and scientific terminology, which, in practice, amounts to bothering the students with meaningless questions as they do real work, and is only in the lab because the head researcher [[Nepotism's wife is his cousin.]] He is trying to suck up to Vin Drake on the entire trip to Hawai'i, uselessly quotes philosophers, is responsible for Jenny's death by letting her drown after being too afraid he'll be pulled into a flash-flood of raindrops, refuses to help with the group fashioning weapons and poison as defense (and would have stayed in the bunker if it hadn't been destroyed by the Chief of Security chopping it in half), mocks Erica's faith and prayer when she's severely traumatized by several deaths and the whole gravity of the situation, and worst of all, tries to sell out the survivors to Nanigen. It's not known if this was Crichton's intention (as Crichton has had psychology portrayed positively before), or Preston's.
  • Heroic BSOD: Erika, after shrinking, is constantly in horrified shock after the first death occurs - it ramps up to obvious PTSD wheen Peter is slain. The survivors (minus Danny) have to keep encouraging her to move.
  • The Hero Dies: In a major subversion of most of Crichton's work, Peter, de-facto team leader and most level headed of the crew, is gibbed by a shot from the two mercenaries assigned by Drake to track them down. Rick, portrayed as a grumbling, impotently rageful anti-corporate environmentalist who claims to have braved Costa Rica's wilderness when he actually stayed in a hotel after three days of mosquitoes, becomes the protagonist. Also, Peter's brother, supposedly killed in the beginning, shows up to help take down Drake.
  • Hollywood Atheist: Danny mocks Erika whenever she prays.
  • Jerkass: Danny, post-shrinking. He complains every step of the way, forces the team to stop to deal with his petulant antics, lets Jenny drown to save his hide, mocks Erika - who is deep in shock and mourning after Peter's death, and eventually tries to sell out the team to Vin Drake.
    • Rick, before his promotion to protagonist. It's noted he's a confrontational eco-warrior about everything and brags about the field work he's done (when, in fact, he was driven off by mosquitos and spent the trip in an air-conditioned hotel).
  • Lampshade Hanging: There is a sequence where Amar asks just how they're still functioning if their atoms have been completely shrunk down, along with all the microorganisms and cells inside them, such as intestinal bacteria. All the students can surmise is that Nanigen really doesn't understand their tech well.
  • Rewarded as a Traitor Deserves: One of the students, Danny, tries to sell out the protagonists to Vin Drake just to save his own hide. However, his stolen micro-plane is attacked by bats and he gets killed off before he can even meet up with Vin Drake.

The Lost World 1995Creator/Michael CrichtonNeXT

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