troperville

tools

toys


main index

Narrative

Genre

Media

Topical Tropes

Other Categories

TV Tropes Org
random
Literature: A Study In Scarlet
A Study in Scarlet, written by Arthur Conan Doyle and published in 1887, introduced the character of Sherlock Holmes to the world. The story begins with Dr. John Watson, a veteran of the Afghan wars who has come to London after leaving the army, looking for lodgings. He is introduced to the eccentric Holmes, who is looking for a roommate, and they secure lodgings at 221B Baker Street. Soon after, Holmes is asked to assist in a murder investigation—the victim has been found dead in a blood-spattered room, but with no marks on him. Scotland Yard is clueless, but Holmes finds the killer, and reveals a tale of love and revenge.

This page is for tropes unique to this novel. For general tropes regarding Sherlock Holmes in Conan Doyle's stories, see the Sherlock Holmes literature page.


Tropes:

  • Asshole Victim: Both of the men Jefferson Hope kills have it coming, as they murdered Ferrier and kidnapped Lucy (and were more or less responsible for her death as well).
  • Break-In Threat: John Ferrier is being threatened by a Mormon cult, and wakes up one morning with their sign painted on his chest.
  • Characterization Marches On: Some of Holmes' characteristics hardly matches from the later books. The part where Sherlock claims ignoring everything that isn't related to his work like that the earth revolves around the sun. Also, Watson is amazed at his ignorance on subjects like Politics or Phylosophy while later works show him great knowledge of both subjects.
    • This would fall more under Character Development — clearly either Watson's knowledge rubbed off on Holmes, or Holmes realized that actually, random knowledge could be very useful in detective work, especially when it comes to making deductions about other peoples' personalities, motives, or professions.
  • Circling Vultures: When Ferrier and Lucy are stranded in the Great Basin of the American west without water, some buzzards begin observing them closely.
  • Clueless Mystery: As was standard practice in Sherlock Holmes stories (and most detective fiction of the day). The murderer does not appear until the moment he is captured, and after a long flashback telling his story, Holmes explains how he caught him.
  • Couldn't Find a Lighter: The first time Watson meets Holmes, Holmes is using a hot coal from the fireplace to light his pipe.
  • Couldn't Find a Pen: The detectives find the word "RACHE" written in blood.
  • Death by Despair: Apparently Lucy's fate after she is forced into a Mormon polygamous marriage.
  • Early Installment Weirdness: see Characterization Marches On. The second part also cut away to an omniscient narrator rather than staying in Watson's POV.
  • First Episode Spoiler: For the first two chapters, the profession of Sherlock Holmes is treated like a mystery. He's a detective.
  • Genre Shift: The first half is a bona fide mystery story. The bits set in Utah, on the other hand, are much more like a western. 
  • Good Old Fisticuffs: Holmes demonstrates.
    "The whole thing occurred in a moment, so quickly that I had no time to realize it. I have a vivid recollection of that instant, of Holmes' triumphant expression and the ring of his voice, of the cabman's dazed, savage face, as he glared at the glittering handcuffs, which had appeared as if by magic upon his wrists."
  • Happily Adopted: Lucy Ferrier by John Ferrier.
  • Historical Villain Upgrade:
    • Brigham Young is a mild case. He doesn't serve as an antagonist for Holmes, but he's portrayed as a crazed religious zealot with zero sympathy for anyone outside of his devoted group of followers, and he turns out to be directly responsible for the events motivating the sympathetic vigilante who commits the murders in the book.
    • The Mormons in general. The Danites really did exist as a sort of Mormon vigilante group, although there is little evidence that they were still active after the migration to Utah. And Mormon violence upon unbelievers was not unprecedented—see the Mountain Meadows Massacre. But no one in the Mormon church of the day would have been compelled to practice polygamy or surrender their daughter to a polygamous marriage. Most Mormons did not practice polygamy, although a rich landowner like John Ferrier would have been the type that did. It is also hardly likely that the Mormons would have compelled someone to join them by force or compelled them to remain in the faith by force, much less hunt down and murder anyone who left Salt Lake City. The novel reflects the status of Mormons as invokedOnce Acceptable Targets, mainly due to their practice of polygamy (which was banned by the LDS church three years after the publication of A Study in Scarlet).
  • Inspector Lestrade: This novel has two, the Trope Namer as well as his fellow detective and rival, Inspector Gregson. Gregson mostly disappeared from later installments while Lestrade became the long-running and much more well-known character.
  • Leaning on the Fourth Wall: Watson compares Holmes to Edgar Allan Poe's Dupin and says "I had no idea that such individuals did exist outside of stories."
  • Playing Drunk: The killer plays drunk to allay suspicion after returning to the scene of the crime.
  • Rescue Romance: Jefferson falls in love with Lucy after he saved her from bulls.
  • Sympathetic Murderer: Jefferson.
  • Take That: Holmes takes jabs at two famous literary detectives:
    • He gives some grudging credit to Edgar Allan Poe's Auguste Dupin: "He had some analytical genius, no doubt; but he was by no means such a phenomenon as Poe appeared to imagine."
    • Holmes angrily tears into Emile Gaboriau's Monsieur Lecoq:
    "Lecoq was a bungler," he said, in an angry voice; "he had only one thing to recommend him, and that was his energy. That book made me positively ill. The question was how to identify an unknown prisoner. I could have done it in twenty-four hours. Lecoq took six months or so. It might be a textbook for detectives to teach them what to avoid."
  • Title Drop: After seeing the blood-spattered room Holmes pronounces his first case with Watson "a study in scarlet".
  • Whole Episode Flashback: Most of Part II leaves Holmes behind completely in order to tell the backstory of Jefferson Hope and Lucy in the American west.
  • Woobie, Destroyer of Worlds: Jefferson Hope, who enacts some vigilante justice after his friend is murdered and his girlfriend is trapped in a Mormon marriage (and soon dies).
  • Your Days Are Numbered: Once Hope is captured he willingly tells his story, because he's got an aortic aneurysm that is due to blow and kill him at any moment.
The Sign Of The FourDetective LiteratureThe Valley Of Fear
The Sign Of The FourMystery LiteratureThe Valley Of Fear

random
TV Tropes by TV Tropes Foundation, LLC is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available from thestaff@tvtropes.org.
Privacy Policy
12168
43