List / Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame Inductees

List of inductees into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame. Red links should eventually get pages.

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     1986 
  • Chuck Berry: Early and influential singer and guitarist. Songs like "Johnny B. Goode" and "Maybellene" laid the template for rock and roll as we know it. Also a 2000 Kennedy Center Honoree and #5 on Rolling Stone's list of the 100 Greatest Artists of All Time. Received the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 1984.
  • The Everly Brothers: Don and Phil Everly. Known for their tight vocal harmonies on songs like "Bye Bye Love" and "All I Have to Do is Dream." Also inductees in the Country Music Hall of Fame and #33 on Rolling Stone's 100 Greatest Artists list. Received the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 1997.
  • Elvis Presley: "The King," who was a key figure in popularizing rock and making black music appeal to white people. His hip-swiveling performances were considered scandalous at the time. Best-known for "Hound Dog," his cover of Carl Perkins' "Blue Suede Shoes," "Heartbreak Hotel," "Can't Help Falling in Love," and comeback single "Suspicious Minds." #3 on Rolling Stone's 100 Greatest Artists list. Received the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 1971.
  • Little Richard: Rock and roll's most influential pianist. Known for loud, proud, and lewd singles. Self-proclaimed Godfather of Rock and Roll. Also (although unknown at the time) one of the first influential gay performers in rock history. Key songs include "Tutti-Frutti" and "Long Tall Sally." Inductee in numerous other Halls of Fame (including the Songwriters Hall of Fame and Blues Hall of Fame) and #8 on Rolling Stone's 100 Greatest Artists list. Received the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 1993.
  • Jerry Lee Lewis: "The Killer" and rock and roll's second-most influential pianist. Filled with a church boy's conviction and the devil's fire. Signature songs include "Great Balls of Fire" and his cover of "Whole Lotta Shakin' Going On," and the former served as the title of a biopic based on his life (in which he was played by Dennis Quaid). #24 on Rolling Stone's 100 Greatest Artists list. Received the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 2005.
  • James Brown: The Godfather of Soul, the Hardest-Working Man in Show Business, and any other superlative you'd care to name. One of the pioneering figures of soul and funk, the latter of which he basically invented with "Papa's Got a Brand New Bag." Besides that, other signature works include "I Got You (I Feel Good)" note , "It's a Man's Man's Man's World," and "Please Please Please," as well as his famous album Live at the Apollo. His former backing bands, the Famous Flames and the JB's, were (respectively) inducted in 2012 and nominated in 2016. Also a Songwriters Hall of Fame inductee, a 2003 Kennedy Center Honoree, and #7 on Rolling Stone's 100 Greatest Artists list. Received the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 1992.
  • Sam Cooke: Influential soul singer who brought a gospel sense of conviction to mainstream pop and soul. Most famous for "You Send Me" and civil rights anthem "A Change is Gonna Come", which - sadly - only rose to prominence after Cooke's death in 1964. #16 on Rolling Stone's 100 Greatest Artists list. Received the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 1999.
  • Ray Charles: "Brother Ray," the blind pianist who nonetheless rose to prominence in the '50s for his energetic live shows and soulful voice. Most famous for singing "What'd I Say" and his cover of "Georgia On My Mind." A 1986 Kennedy Center Honoree and #10 on Rolling Stone's 100 Greatest Artists list. Received the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 1987.
  • Fats Domino: Yes, another pianist. Combined R&B with jazz, a key building block in rock's evolution. Famous for "Blueberry Hill" and "Ain't That a Shame." #25 on Rolling Stone's 100 Greatest Artists list. Received the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 1987.
  • Buddy Holly: Practically the definition of Short-Lived Big Impact, releasing some of the most influential early rock songs ever with his band the Crickets before tragically perishing in a plane crash in 1959, at the young age of 22. Directly cited as an influence by many future inductees. Most famous for "That'll Be the Day," "Peggy Sue," and "Rave On." #13 on Rolling Stone's 100 Greatest Artists list. Received the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 1997.

     1987 
  • The Coasters: Important R&B band and early influence on doo-wop, with the majority of their most famous songs being written by famed duo Leiber and Stoller. Most famous for "Searchin'" and "Young Blood."
  • Eddie Cochran: One of the more young and rebellious early rockers, most famous for "C'mon Everybody" and "Summertime Blues."
  • Bo Diddley: Very important guitarist who invented the Bo Diddley Beat. Laid down the foundation for up-tempo rock and roll. Most famous for "Bo Diddley" and "Who Do You Love?" #20 on Rolling Stone's 100 Greatest Artists list. Received the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 1998.
  • Aretha Franklin: Lady Soul. The first female Hall of Fame inductee and one of the most important soul singers of all time. Helped put Stax Records on the map. Most famous for the albums Lady Soul and I Never Loved A Man The Way I Love You, as well as "Chain of Fools" and her famous covers of Carole King's "(You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman" and Otis Redding's "Respect." note  1993 Kennedy Center Honoree and #9 on Rolling Stone's 100 Greatest Artists list. Received the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 1994.
  • Marvin Gaye: One of the most influential soul singers of all time, starting out as an R&B superstar in the late '60s for Motown before turning more insightful and personal in the '70s. Most famous for "I Heard It Through the Grapevine," "Ain't No Mountain High Enough" (with Tammi Terrell), "Sexual Healing" (his last hit before his death in 1984), the album Here My Dear, and, most notably, protest album What's Going On (and its title song). Also a Songswriters Hall of Fame and Rhythm and Blues Hall of Fame inductee, and #18 on Rolling Stone's 100 Greatest Artists list. Received the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 1996.
  • Bill Haley: Practically invented rock and roll as we know it with his band the Comets' single "(We're Gonna) Rock Around the Clock," which became a hit after appearing in the movie Blackboard Jungle. The Comets were inducted in 2012.
  • B.B. King: Perhaps the greatest blues guitarist who ever lived, with a level of influence on pretty much every rock guitarist since. Made his name in the '50s and '60s, recording several successful live albums and the song "The Thrill is Gone." Member of the Blues Hall of Fame and a 1995 Kennedy Center Honoree. Received the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 1987.
  • Clyde McPhatter: Original lead singer of the Drifters. Known for his tenor voice, he served as a huge inspiration for R&B singers past and present.
  • Ricky Nelson: One of the most famous singer/actors of all time. Known for "Poor Little Fool" (and, outside of music, for starring in the movie Rio Bravo.).
  • Roy Orbison: Important rock and soul singer, who borrowed heavily from Elvis. Major influence on the third wave of rock singers in the '70s, particularly Bruce Springsteen. A member of The Travelling Wilburys, which were helping set him on the road to a comeback at the time of his induction. Sadly, he passed away later that year. Most famous for "Crying," "Only the Lonely (Know the Way I Feel)," and "Oh, Pretty Woman." #37 on Rolling Stone's 100 Greatest Artists list.
  • Carl Perkins: Important member of the Sun Records roster. Merged rock and country and released the classic "Blue Suede Shoes." #99 on Rolling Stone's 100 Greatest Artists list.
  • Smokey Robinson: Lead singer of Smokey Robinson And The Miracles (the Miracles were inducted in 2012). One of the most famous soul vocalists ever, as well as a highly successful songwriter. Most famous for "You Really Got a Hold on Me," "The Tracks of My Tears," and "Ooh, Baby, Baby." Winner of the Gershin Award in 2016 and a 2006 Kennedy Center Honoree. He and the Miracles were #32 on Rolling Stone's 100 Greatest Artists list. Received the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 1999.
  • Big Joe Turner: Early merger of rock and R&B. Performer of "Shake, Rattle, and Roll" and "Honey Hush."
  • Muddy Waters: Perhaps the most famous bluesman of all time. A longtime veteran prior to a spike in popularity in the 1950s. Widely-appreciated artist of the rock stars of the '60s, particularly the Rolling Stones. Most famous for "Mannish Boy," "Rolling Stone," "Hoochie Coochie Man," and "Got My Mojo Workin'." Blues Hall of Fame inductee and #17 on Rolling Stone's 100 Greatest Artists list. Received the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 1992.
  • Jackie Wilson: Famous soul musician of the '50s and '60s. His stage presence was one of the most notable ones of the '60s. #69 (heh-heh, 69) on Rolling Stone's 100 Greatest Artists list.

     1988 
  • Bob Dylan: The most influential folk and rock musician of the 1960s, and maybe all time. Most famous for his protest songs, going electric, and pretty much anything else you'd care to name. Among his awards (because yeah, he's got a lot), he won the 2016 Nobel Prize for Literature, he's #2 on Rolling Stone's 100 Greatest Artists list, he's a 1997 Kennedy Center Honoree, he received the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 1991, and his song "Like a Rolling Stone" is probably the most frequently-cited pick for the greatest song of all time.
  • The Beatles: Changed the face of rock and roll by meshing their early rock influences with their own exemplary songwriting skills. Managed to successfully find a happy medium between pop success and experimentation. The rest, I assume you know already. #1 on Rolling Stone's 100 Greatest Artists list. Most famous for some of the most famous albums of all time (such as Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, Revolver, Rubber Soul, Abbey Road, The White Album, etc., etc., etc.) as well as non-album singles like "I Want to Hold Your Hand" (which helped kick-start the British Invasion), "She Loves You," "Yesterday," and "Hey Jude." Each of the individual members would eventually receive solo inductions (John Lennon in 1994, Paul McCartney in 1999, George Harrison in 2004, and Ringo Starr in 2015). Received the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 2014.
  • The Beach Boys: The most influential surf-rock group ever. The Beach Boys ruled the '60s with their tight harmonies and steadily-innovating music, which culminated in their two defining artistic statements: 1966's Pet Sounds and the song "Good Vibrations," each the brainchild of perfectionist Brian Wilson. Wilson was famously in contention with bandmate Mike Love, but the fact remains that they made some excellent music. The band came in 12th on Rolling Stone's 100 Greatest Artists list and are Vocal Group Hall of Fame inductees. Wilson is also a Songwriters Hall of Fame inductee and a 2007 Kennedy Center Honoree. The group received the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 2001.
  • The Supremes: Diana Ross-led pop vocal group from the '60s; quite possibly the most famous all-female group ever. One of the key groups that put Motown Records on the map (and Ross was married to Motown founder Berry Gordy). #96 on Rolling Stone's 100 Greatest Artists list. Most famous for "Baby Love," "Where Did Our Love Go?," and "You Keep Me Hangin' On." Ross was a 2007 Kennedy Center Honoree and received the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 2012, though she is yet to be inducted into the Hall as a solo artist.
  • The Drifters: Another highly-successful vocal group of the '50s and '60s. Their first lead singer, Clyde McPhatter, was inducted the previous year, making him the first two-time Hall of Fame inductee. There were three different incarnations of the Drifters, one led by McPhatter, one by Ben E. King (of "Stand by Me" fame), and one formed by Atlantic Records. Some of their famous songs include "Money Honey," "Under the Boardwalk," "There Goes My Baby," "Save the Last Dance for Me," and "Up on the Roof." #81 on Rolling Stone's 100 Greatest Artists list.

     1989 
  • Stevie Wonder: At the time, the youngest living Hall of Fame inductee (only 38). Created a prolific catalogue of albums and singles, with sixteen under his belt by the time he was 22. This was followed by one of the most successful four-album streaks of any artist, with Music Of My Mind, Talking Book, Innervisions, and double album Songs in the Key of Life. He also scored several #1 singles, including "Superstition" and "You Are the Sunshine of My Life," and is also famous for "Living for the City" and "Happy Birthday." A 1999 Kennedy Center Honoree, a 1983 Songwriters Hall of Fame inductee, and #15 on Rolling Stone's 100 Greatest Artists list. Received the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 1996.
  • The Rolling Stones: Hugely-influential English rock group. Frontman Mick Jagger and guitarist Keith Richards are among the most respected in their fields. They took heavily after blues musicians like Muddy Waters and Howlin' Wolf, and managed to largely duck the psychedelic trends of the '60s with music that was grittier than most British Invasion fare. Still around to this day, something that can't necessarily be said for many other inducted bands. Most famous for the albums Beggars Banquet, Sticky Fingers, Let It Bleed, Exile On Main Street, and New Sound Album Some Girls. Famous individual songs include "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction," "Honky Tonk Women," "Jumpin' Jack Flash," "Gimme Shelter," "You Can't Always Get What You Want," and "Sympathy for the Devil." #4 on Rolling Stone's 100 Greatest Artists list. Jagger was also knighted by the British Empire in 2003. Also received the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 1986.
  • Dion: Doo-wop and rock & roll singer who was most famous in the early 1960s for songs like "The Wanderer" and "Runaround Sue." Pulled a very successful Genre Shift to folk music in the mid-1960s, and had a hit in that style with "Abraham, Martin and John".
  • The Temptations: One of the most popular vocal groups of all time, and a staple of the Motown roster. Had a load of lead singers. Most famous for "Papa Was a Rollin' Stone" and "My Girl," the latter of which was performed ecstatically by the inductees that year. #68 on Rolling Stone's 100 Greatest Artists list. Received the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 2013.
  • Otis Redding: One of the most famous R&B singers of the 1960s. Was a passionate, charismatic, and smooth performer who sadly perished in a plane crash in 1968 (alongside members of future inductees the O'Jays). Most famous for "Try a Little Tenderness," "I've Been Loving You Too Long (To Stop Now)," and the posthumously-released "(Sittin' On) The Dock of the Bay." #21 on Rolling Stone's 100 Greatest Artists list. Received the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 1999.

     1990 
  • Hank Ballard
  • Bobby Darin
  • The Four Seasons
  • Four Tops
  • The Kinks
  • The Platters
  • Simon & Garfunkel
  • The Who

     1991 
  • LaVern Baker
  • The Byrds
  • John Lee Hooker
  • The Impressions
  • Wilson Pickett
  • Jimmy Reed
  • Ike & Tina Turner

     1992 
  • Bobby "Blue" Bland
  • Booker T. & The M.G.'s
  • Johnny Cash
  • The Isley Brothers
  • The Jimi Hendrix Experience
  • Sam & Dave
  • The Yardbirds

     1993 
  • Ruth Brown
  • Cream
  • Creedence Clearwater Revival
  • The Doors
  • Frankie Lymon & The Teenagers
  • Etta James
  • Van Morrison
  • Sly and the Family Stone

     1994 
  • The Animals
  • The Band
  • Duane Eddy
  • Grateful Dead
  • Elton John
  • John Lennon
  • Bob Marley
  • Rod Stewart

     1995 
  • The Allman Brothers Band
  • Al Green
  • Janis Joplin
  • Led Zeppelin
  • Martha and the Vandellas
  • Neil Young
  • Frank Zappa

     1996 
  • David Bowie
  • Gladys Knight & The Pips
  • Jefferson Airplane
  • Little Willie John
  • Pink Floyd
  • The Shirelles
  • Velvet Underground

     1997 
  • Bee Gees
  • Buffalo Springfield
  • Crosby, Stills & Nash
  • The Jackson 5
  • Joni Mitchell
  • Parliament-Funkadelic
  • The (Young) Rascals

     1998 
  • Eagles
  • Fleetwood Mac
  • The Mamas & The Papas
  • Lloyd Price
  • Santana
  • Gene Vincent

     1999 
  • Billy Joel
  • Curtis Mayfield
  • Paul McCartney
  • Del Shannon
  • Dusty Springfield
  • Bruce Springstien
  • The Staple Singers

     2000 
  • Eric Clapton
  • Earth, Wind & Fire
  • The Lovin' Spoonful
  • The Moonglows
  • Bonnie Raitt
  • James Taylor

     2001 
  • Aerosmith
  • Solomon Burke
  • The Flamingos
  • Michael Jackson
  • Queen
  • Paul Simon
  • Steely Dan
  • Ritchie Valens

     2002 
  • Isaac Hayes
  • Brenda Lee
  • Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers
  • Gene Pitney
  • Ramones
  • Talking Heads

     2003 
  • AC/DC
  • The Clash
  • Elvis Costello & The Attractions
  • The Police
  • The Righteous Brothers

     2004 
  • Jackson Browne
  • The Dells
  • George Harrison
  • Prince
  • Bob Seger
  • Traffic
  • ZZ Top

     2005 
  • Buddy Guy
  • The O'Jays
  • Pretenders
  • Percy Sledge
  • U2

     2006 
  • Black Sabbath
  • Blondie
  • Miles Davis
  • Lynyrd Skynyrd
  • Sex Pistols

     2007 
  • Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five
  • R.E.M.
  • The Ronettes
  • Patti Smith
  • Van Halen

     2008 
  • The Dave Clark Five
  • Leonard Cohen
  • Madonna
  • John Mellencamp
  • The Ventures

     2009 
  • Jeff Beck
  • Little Anthony and the Imperials
  • Metallica
  • Run-D.M.C.
  • Bobby Womack

     2010 
  • ABBA
  • Genesis
  • Jimmy Cliff
  • The Hollies
  • The Stooges

     2011 
  • Alice Cooper (the band, not their frontman as a solo act)
  • Neil Diamond
  • Dr. John
  • Darlene Love
  • Tom Waits

     2012 
  • Beastie Boys
  • Donovan
  • Guns 'n' Roses
  • Laura Nyro
  • Red Hot Chili Peppers
  • The Small Faces / Faces

     2013 
  • Heart
  • Albert King
  • Randy Newman
  • Public Enemy
  • Rush
  • Donna Summer

     2014 
  • Peter Gabriel
  • Hall & Oates
  • KISS
  • Nirvana
  • Linda Ronstadt
  • Cat Stevens

     2015 
  • The Paul Butterfield Blues Band
  • Joan Jett & The Blackhearts
  • Green Day
  • Lou Reed
  • Stevie Ray Vaughn and Double Trouble
  • Bill Withers

     2016 
  • Cheap Trick
  • Chicago
  • Deep Purple
  • N.W.A.
  • Steve Miller (just him, and not The Steve Miller Band credited on all his hits)

     2017 
  • Electric Light Orchestra
  • Joan Baez
  • Journey
  • Pearl Jam
  • Tupac Shakur
  • Yes
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