Heartwarming / Disney Ducks Comic Universe

Take a look here for moments focusing on Donald Duck.

Carl Barks' Comics
  • The ending of Ten-Dollar Dither is a definite CMOH. Huey, Dewey and Louie have found a ten-dollar bill, and over the course of the story Donald (in an honest mood, and telling the boys that there may be a finder's reward in it for them) tries to find the original owner and goes through some of the worst abuse ever from people who claim the money is theirs and try to get to it. At the end, though, the money turns out to belong to a poor little girl who's ecstatic to have her money back because it means she can buy food. Donald tells the boys that since she couldn't give them any reward, he'll give them one instead — and they refuse, saying that seeing the girl so happy was reward enough.
  • In Barks's first Grandma Duck story, Huey, Dewey and Louie mistakenly believe that Grandma is broke and in danger of losing her farm, and so they donate all their favorite belongings to her, telling her she can sell them and maybe be able to pay her debts.

Don Rosa's Comics
  • The ending of A Little Something Special, especially if you have read the Life and Times.
  • Don Rosa's "A Letter From Home" where Scrooge, Donald and the triplets find the treasure of the Knights Templar underneath Scrooge's family's castle in Scotland. His estranged sister Matilda is there, angry with him for always putting money before family. However, Scrooge is unsuccessful at keeping the Jerkass Fašade on (in one point stepping in front of Matilda to prevent from getting shot), and in the end he confesses to Matilda that he feels he will never be as rich as Donald, who has three nephews who adore him.
  • Secret of Sampo is one CMOH directed at Don Rosa's Finnish fans.
    • At the end of that same story, Väinämöinen gives Scrooge a choice: leave with him and enjoy eternal prosperity, or stay on Earth where a "lost love" (implied to be Goldie) still awaits him. Even though the choice visibly hurts him, Scrooge does not even hesitate one second in choosing Earth.
  • Yet another Don Rosa moment that deserves mention is The Dream of a Lifetime in which the Beagle Boys invade Scrooge's dreams to get him to tell the combinations to the locks, and Donald going in after them to prevent this from happening. After many amusing scenes of Scrooge dreaming about his dramatic past and Donald managing to kick out the Beagle Boys, he manages to change the outcome of Scrooge's "Klondike dream" where Scrooge is hit on the head and faints before he can save Goldie. Thanks to Donald and the Beagle Boys messing it up, it leaves Scrooge with a chance he never got in life - to spend that night with Goldie after rescuing her. Donald is kicked out of his dream, and Gyro Gearloose and the nephews want to wake their uncle up. However, Donald stops them.
    Donald: No! Don't! Wait! This brain-invasion messed up a lot of Uncle Scrooge's dreams, but it changed the course of one PARTICULAR dream —- the one he's having right now!
    Gyro: Look at that smile! Is he finding fabulous treasure?
    Donald: Treasure? Yes, you might say it's a treasure for which he's been searching for 50 years, and he's finally found it... if only in his dreams. So let him sleep. Anything we have to say can wait until morning.
    • In the same story, Donald meets his mother when she was a baby in one of Scrooge's dreams and he's overjoyed. It's amusing but heartwarming as well.
    • Donald stopping Gyro and his newphews from waking Scrooge is even more heartwarming when one takes his own relationship with Scrooge into account. At various points, in both Barks original stories and Rosa's later ones, Donald and Scrooge are placed at odds with eachother due to their different beliefs and backgrounds. The times that Donald is working for his uncle he's required to put his life on the line for at most thirty cents an hour and Scrooge often doesn't care about whatever pain or danger his nephew goes through. Yet despite all of that Donald has always supported the idea of his uncle being with Goldie and finding love, the one treasure that Scrooge has never been able to gain, and makes sure that his uncle can at least experience it in his dreams.
  • What is Scrooge's most prized possession? All the money in his money bin (and the memories stored therein)? His #1 Dime? His Goose Egg Gold Nugget? The answer: a lock of Goldie's hair, from the events of The Prisoner of White Agony Creek.
    • Related to this in a way there's The Coin, a Don Rosa story where Scrooge loses a quarter from his money bin and spends the entire story attempting to get it back and is clearly distraught over it. At the story's end, once he does get it back, it's revealed that the reason he was so upset wasn't because he lost any random quarter. It' s one of the coins he gave Glittering Goldie after they'd stayed together for a month and she in turn threw back at him out of anger. Specifically it's the coin that landed on his head.
  • There are two major moments from Rosa's The Magnificent Seven (Minus Four) Caballeros!. The first is at the start of the story. Donald is fired by Scrooge and thrown out onto the curb (And during this sequence Scrooge is also telling Donald to be back tomorrow to make up for the time you lost getting fired today!), verbally mocked and literally stepped on by Gladstone, berated by Daisy for being dirty for their date (Remember he's been throw onto the ground and stepped on by this point), after which she punches him in the face and says she'll never speak to him again (And then similarly to Scrooge she, ironically, reminds him not to forget that he's "]taking her to dinner tonight), and when finally asked by his nephews why he lets people treat him this way Donald sadly says that it's his lot in life to be mistreated so that others can feel better! How do his nephews respond? They secretly set it up so that Donald goes on a trip to Rio and runs into his old friends José Carioca and Panchito Pistoles. This is made even more significant due to the opening of the story which is basically a condensed version of the suffering that Donald has gone through over the course of his career/life and the constant abuse he suffers at the hands of those closest to him. José and Panchito are then not only two of Donald's closest friends, they're also some of the few characters within any Duck Universe that don't treat him badly.
    • The second moment comes in later in the story when the Three Caballeros are on the hunt for treasure. When discussing what they plan to do with their shares José and Panchito both mention spending their riches on things for themselves, which Donald finds to be exciting. Donald however simply mentions his nephews and that the money will help him put them through college. After this both of his friends simply look at eachother before bursting out in shame, praising Donald for thinking of his nephews when they were only thinking of themselves. This is perhaps made even more heartwarming since this is how both of his friends react to Donald on a regular basis. They're amazed by the adventures he's been on, praise him whenever he shows courage (Even when it's on accident), and generally treat him with both a respect and acceptance that he really doesn't recieve anywhere else, except from his nephews.
  • The conclusion to Super Snooper Strikes Again! where Huey, Dewey, and Louie, after earlier making Donald feel inadequate as a role model due to his job as an adult delivery boy, reveal how they really think of him.
    Dewey: Poor Unca Donald! Do you suppose he thinks we're ashamed of him or something?
    Huey: We should tell him more often we think he's pretty special!
    Louie: He may not be as rich or as clever as Unca Scrooge.
    Dewey: He may not be as smart or skilled as Gyro Gearloose.
    Huey: And he may not be as good looking or successful as Cousin Gladstone!
    Louie: No, but he's still got them all beat! Unca Donald has raised us well and cared for us all along!
    Dewey: Single-handed and on his income!
    Huey: And we've sometimes been ungrateful and horrible to him!
    Louie: I'd say Unca Donald is a pretty super kinda guy!
    Dewey: Agreed!
    Huey: Yeah! Super Snooper may be the mightiest mortal to ever trod the soil, but he's no Donald Duck!
  • In A Letter from Home, also known as The Old Castle's Other Secret, you have the revelation at the beginning of the story that Donald was the only one who knew Matilda, Scrooge's estranged sister, had been living at the old McDuck castle as its caretaker and that Donald had been attempting for some time to convince her to reunite with her brother without Scrooge ever knowing. Similarly to how Donald consistently attempts to push his Uncle to get with Glittering Goldie this is perhaps one of the ultimate signs of Donald's love for his Uncle, in that he's spent years attempting to get him back with the rest of his family, despite Scrooge's typical Jerkass Fašade.

  • Several stories have Huey, Dewey and Louie lamenting that their uncle is such a screw-up compared to just about everyone else and try to turn him into a bigger success. Whether they succeed or not depends on the story, but one such story had them complaining to each other about Donald's many flaws — only to suddenly realize that no matter if Donald is a big success or not, he still takes care of them, cooks for them, makes sure they're clothed and happy, and on the whole uses a lot more money on them than he does on himself. Cue guilt and a resolve to start appreciating their uncle a little more in the future.
    • Otherwise, sometimes Donald is offered a job that will make him rich and popular, but he rejects it just so that he can take care of his nephews.
  • One of the "special extras" in the weekly italian comics regarded the homes of various characters. Each one has a peculiar "secret" that that character hides. To name a few:
    • Donald keeps a secret stash of money for his nephews in his garden's tree. Considering that Donald is tormented by a multitude of creditors...
    • Scrooge keeps a wallet with the charitable donations he did.
    • Rockerduck has a giant portrait of himself and the label "The Number One". Except that it can rotate to show a portrait of Scrooge instead.
    • Magica De Spell has the fairy outfit from when she was a little girl.
  • The Italian series "The Amazing Adventures of Fantomius-Gentleman Thief", set in the Twenties, shows Scrooge coming back to Duckburg to reunite with his sisters in 1922, with the implication he had done so at least once before. Turns into a Tear Jerker when he finds out they're out of town, says he was back only to make sure Fantomius wouldn't steal his money, and instructs Miss Quackfaster to not say anyone he had been back.