The following series in the ''Pokémon'' franchise have their own {{Headscratchers}} pages. New discussion related to those series should be placed in their respective pages.

[[index]]
* Headscratchers/PokemonAnime
* ''[[Headscratchers/PokemonArceusAndTheJewelOfLife Arceus and the Jewel of Life]]''
* ''Headscratchers/PokemonRanger''
* ''Headscratchers/PokemonMysteryDungeon''
* ''Headscratchers/PokemonBlackAndWhite''
* ''Headscratchers/PokemonDiamondAndPearl''
* ''Headscratchers/PokemonColosseum''
* ''Headscratchers/PokemonXAndY''
* ''Headscratchers/PokemonBlack2AndWhite2''
* General Headscratchers/PokemonArchive.
* General Headscratchers/PokemonArchiveLate2010.
[[/index]]

'''''Please add new entries to the bottom of the page.'''''

'''''Note: When adding an answer please don't use personal anecdotes and/or 'This troper'. They're simply not needed and are unnecessary.'''''
----
* So if you try to use a specific item in an area it can't be used, you get a message from Oak saying, "[Player]! You can't use that here!" Um.... is Oak spying on Red through some camera footage or something?
** In the newer games, the message says something like " Professor So-and-So's words rang in [Player]'s head: ''[Player], there's a time and a place for everything, but not right now.'' " Maybe Red was just thinking of what Oak would say?
* Why hasn't the concept of Pokemon sizes been introduced in the games yet? Its commonplace within nature, that there will be variation between animal sizes of the same species that can be advantageous and disadvantageous depending on the circumstances. Heck, the anime has often touched upon this theme.
** Once in a blue moon, you could come across a ''Giant Pokemon'' that has insane attack power and defense. They're like tanks, they can take a lot of damage thanks to high stamina, but their speed is poor, they'll almost never get first turn. On the other end of the spectrum, you might encounter the equally rare ''Mini Pokemon'', with low attack power, but speed and evasion is incredible, thanks to its very small size.
*** That'd just be another set of [=IV=]s, and it's frustrating enough already trying to get a Pokemon with [=IV=]s that compliment the base stats of its species.
** [[http://bulbapedia.bulbagarden.net/wiki/Pumpkaboo_%28Pok%C3%A9mon%29 It has been introduced]], [[http://bulbapedia.bulbagarden.net/wiki/Gourgeist hasn't it?]]
* How did society ever function before the invention of the Pokeball? If wild Pokemon (feeling threatened for no good reason) supposedly attack people, without Pokemon to protect themselves with, how could they ever farm, live off the land, or do anything? People back then must have been at their ''[[NatureIsNotNice mercy]]''.
** Guns.
*** Bombs.
** It could be that back then, they would have had tamers, rather than everyone being able to catch them. For example, certain people could have had N-like powers (To speak with mons) and those people are in small quantity now.
*** Before the invention of the Pokéball, people being at the Pokémon's mercy, people with N-like powers... Why has nobody fanficced this?
** PokemonConquest shows that before Pokeballs (Or at least in a region that doesn't use Pokeballs) trainers tamed Pokemon, rather than catch them. The Pokemon became their partners because they sensed a kinship, or were impressed by their strength. This seems the most likely answer. Not to mention before Pokeballs they used Apricorns. But how long ago that was, or how many centuries they used them is unknown.
* '''Why''' can't you catch a wild Pokemon if it faints?
** Would you really want to be prompted to catch every single wild Pokemon you defeat? How do you want the game to differentiate between defeating it to capture it or defeating it for exp, etc., or just to get rid of it?
** You're prompted when its defeated anyway. The game never prompts you to cancel evolution by simply pressing the B button to stop evolution while it is evolving. Yet every gamer knows this anyway. Would holding down B when it faints cripple the game?
** Its just an excuse to have stronger Pokeballs and weaker Pokemon.
** I can't think of an in-universe explanation, but gameplay wise it's there to add challenge instead of letting players brute force their way through the game.
** In the real world, [[TapOnTheHead being hurt so badly that you faint means you have a concision at best and serious brain damage at worst.]] My explanation is, when they faint, they're either dead or dying, and if they've sustained that much damage the pokeball can't log them/register them because they're too damaged for it to recognize them. But once you've caught a pokemon the pokeball is customized to recognize that pokemon and nothing else. (which is why you don't get a pokeball back when you release your pokes.) So! When you battle and your pokemon faints, you can return it to the pokeball and keep it in a time-stasis like state until you reach the pokemon center and get it medical attention. But with wild pokemon you can't.
** Hell, in the anime, the characters are required to faint/stun/KO/disable any Pokemon if they want to catch it!
** One of the primary requirements for a Pokemon Trainer is the ability to befriend caught Pokemons and make them your ally (and it is implied that even Team Rocket cares about Pokemons they use in battle). I think that, when they faint, you can theoretically catch them, but the game will not let you do that. After all, they'll not obey you anyway, because, well, you just beat them to a pulp.
* Why isn't Water weak to Ice? For moves like Ice Beam and Blizzard, I can almost understand, as the ice is created and not frozen from existing water, but Ice moves are capable of freezing ''Fire types, including ones composed of lava!'' Not to mention that there are Ice-type moves said to be beams of ''pure cold.'' If something can freeze lava, it should have no trouble dispatching a fish.
** Actually, as of Gen VI there is a move (Freeze dry) that IS super effective against water. Game freak must have heard your prayers.
** Ever hold an ice cube under a facet? Flowing water can wear ice down faster than ''fire''.
** In the real world, cold temperatures are good for fish because it increases the amount of O2 that can be dissolved/contained within water. If the water gets too warm they can't breathe. This is why you can still go ice fishing in the winter. That said a fish out of water should still be susceptible...
** IRL, water cools more slowly than air, so, for example, coastal areas have milder winters than nearby inland areas. Makes sense that water would resist ice.
* Why is the Ice type weak to Rock and Steel? Shouldn't it be the other way around, given what water freezing in a crack does to surrounding rock? It should also be super-effective against Steel, because extreme cold makes metal brittle and weak.
** Try bashing a slab of ice with a rock. Try it the other way around. It may not be a perfect explanation, but there you go.
** Ice is a step up from Ground. It can freeze Ground, but the tiniest rock can smash it.
* How does an isolated island with less than a thousand people develop so much technology/etc.? For that matter, how big are the regions anyways?
** Some of the people might well be that intelligent. And so few around, there's very little drain on the natural resources (metals, woods, waters, etc).
** To answer the latter question, it varies. The first four regions are all locations in Japan, and of them Johto is the smallest. Unova is the smallest region apart from the previous four because it's just a big oval shape. Kalos is the biggest because it is then mitre state of France and has not one, but two Pokedexes you can obtain.
* Did a competitive metagame with tiers exist back in Gen I? Or did Smogon just develop one recently for Gen I fans?
** The "competitive battling" types didn't exist for most of the Red/Blue era. They slowly began to appear during the time leading up to the release of Gold and Silver in Japan (some of the earliest "competitive battling"-related sites sprang up or became more well-known around this time.) Sometime after the Japanese release, but before we knew all the English names, the Competitive Battling Zombie Apocalypse happened. Suddenly, legions of StopHavingFunGuys swarmed onto the forums and places that were formerly talking about all kinds of Pokémon-related things were drowned in a flood of "rate my team" threads, links to online battle simulators, tier lists, and "standard" movesets. I know, because I was there--I'm a survivor of the AOL Pokémon forums' CBZA (one of the few, it seems--most were either infected, left the forums shortly after the CBZA happened, or lost interest in Pokémon altogether.) So yeah, this sort of mindset (complete with tier lists, "standard" movesets, and online battle simulators) did exist in the Red/Blue era, it just wasn't anywhere near as widespread as it is now, restricted more to small groups of people on certain Pokémon forums rather than being an "everywhere on the Internet" sort of thing.
* Zubat can stare (Mean Look) at you enough to make you run away even though it has no eyes. Did he inherit Brock's eyes?
** Look at those frightful fangs coming directly at you and try not to run away.
*** I'd try Thundershock, Confusion, or Ice Beam as a reflex action.
*** Frightful? They’re [[CuteLittleFangs so cute]] though! [[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast Golbat]] on the other hand...
** Umm, Mean Look doesn't make you run away. It makes you ''unable'' to run away.
** He makes odd face contortions, trying to use mean look, and fails so epicly your Pokémon is laughing so hard he can't escape?
** Maybe thats how Zubat's Mean Look works. When a Zubat has to opens its eyes, it can only be trouble.
** Or he's making an ILLUSION of eyes to scare you.
* How does Wally ever catch any Pokémon of his own? You got him a ''Ralts''. They only know Growl until you level them up.
** Struggle.
*** This troper has honestly, on more than one occasion, cauught a low-level Ralts and leveled it up just using Struggle.
** Or just throwing a Poke Ball at a weak Pokémon.
*** Despite the fact that his party consists of a level 16 Ralts (and that's it) in Mauville City...
** He does live near the Daycare center.
** You only need to level it up once to get Confusion. A single Rare Candy does the trick. Or Day Care, ([[GameplayAndStorySegregation though the player]] ''[[GameplayAndStorySegregation always]]'' [[TheComputerIsACheatingBastard needs a Pokémon by his/her side...]])
*** He could have used a TM, however I don't remember seeing an NPC with a TM move.
**** Tell that to the Dusclops that I met in the Elite Four that knows Thunderbolt.
*** You don't have to be a prodigy to throw a Poke Ball and get lucky and catch some random Pokémon while you put your good one in the Daycare.
** OK, [[{{@/bwburke94}} I]] figured it out. Remember how he temporarily had a Zigzagoon? Well, its ability is Pickup, and it picked up a Rare Candy (which was indeed possible in RS). Game Freak just forgot to change it for Emerald.
*** He could have just gotten extremely lucky and caught another Pokemon on his first try. He could put out Ralts, then switch to his other Pokemon. Lather, rinse, repeat. Simple, really.
* The assumption that the Master Ball is 100% effective at capturing any and all Pokemon really bugs me, primarily because my own experience with the game has proven otherwise, but I've not found a single other example from anyone else to verify that that's the case. I know I remember, when I tried to capture Mewtwo and Suicune back in the day with a Master Ball, they kept breaking out, no matter how low I got their health, but for the life of me, I can't seem to find one instance of this happening to anyone else. Did I just imagine it? Were my games glitchy? Or is it just a rare occurrence in the game that a Master Ball fails?
** You must be imagining things, or you were experiencing one Hell of a glitch.
*** I know I wasn't imagining things; I've had it happen to me when I tried to catch Mewtwo in the original Pokemon Red, and I had it happen to me again when I tried to catch Suicune in Pokemon Silver. Two times in two different games against two different Pokémon can't be a coincidence. I even remember what I was doing when it happened: I was trying to capture them normally with Ultra Balls, and got so fed up with them busting out that I used the Master Ball on them. They busted out of those, too. Maybe that's the glitch; if you use enough of the other Poke Balls on a Pokémon, and they keep busting out of them, then there's a chance the computer will register your use of the Master Ball afterward as just another Poke Ball.
**** The failure in Pokémon Red is somewhat possible due to some stuff at the RNG that actually give it a 255/256 possibility of capturing. However, the rest of it is just a bunch of baseless lies.
** It's supposed to be 100% effective, but mechanically relies on simply having a 255 times greater chance of successfully capturing a Pokemon. The odds of it failing should be infinitesimal (unless you miss), and close enough to 100% effective for government work, though.
** The Master Ball can '''only''' fail in RBGY, and in those games it only has a 0.04% failure rate against a perfectly healthy Pokemon with a catch rate of 3 (most Legendaries). In all other games it can not possibly fail.
** Hi, sorry, I would like to say that I, too, had one break, and I was playing White. It broke when I was trying to catch a critical health Thundurus. There must be a very tiny fractional chance that it will break across all the games, but it's extremely tiny. I remember because I was incredibly baffled that it broke. I was getting sick chasing the thing around Unova so used my Master Ball, and I was pretty shocked the thing broke (and annoyed because Thundurus fled like an Abra immediately after) and I actually went and checked to see if there was a possibility that it could fail.
* Inspired by the ThereIsNoKillLikeOverkill page - a Psychic attack against a Level 2 Bug/Poison Pokémon by a Level 100 Mewtwo. I just wonder... what does it do to that poor little Pokémon? I could imagine a 30-40 level difference to be a MindRape too close to the MoralEventHorizon for comfort. But a difference of 98 levels, what exactly happens there!?
** All fan-reasoning aside, the grim truth is that (with a few exceptions), Pokemon either had to erect a Great Wall of Separation from Reality or '''somehow''' deal with the ''astounding possibility'' of Pokemon getting killed while fighting each other. YOU try being in the company PR department when kids send tear-stained letters asking if they can bring back Fluffy or Scorchy. Or imagine the reaction to a Pokemon in the anime series getting killed in a battle due to an inexperienced trainer sending it up against a horribly-powerful foe.
** It must be something like that "this is your brain on drugs" ad...
** [[{{Narm}} The same thing]] [[Film/XMen1 that happens to everything else]]. Bugs, while not resistant to Psychic attacks, can hurt Psychics enough to be a partial counterbalance to a Poison weakness. Now, get a Poison/Fighting Pokémon like Croagunk involved...
** By the time it faints, it's probably just twitching violently. You don't stick around long enough to see the [[YourHeadAsplode head explosion]].
** My personal theory is that super-powerful attacks have a tendency to miss smaller targets (I'd imagine aiming a Hyper Beam at a small squirrel would be rather difficult), but the Pokémon just faints out of sheer terror.
*** How about a Wailord (as big as small whale) using Bounce on a Joltik (as small as a cockroach)? How does it actually work? Or a Groudon (950kg, 2094.4lbs) using Stomp on a Joltik?
*** It would probably end something like [[http://browse.deviantart.com/?q=random%20doom%20and%20club%20soda&order=9&offset=48#/d1rqwyd this.]]
*** Groudon brings the foot down hard enough to dent but doesn't step all the way down leaving it in a state where it is unable to battle. If it were a trainer battle it wouldn't even matter if it was smashed, it would quickly be converted into data, reconstructed and then rested in a Pokemon Center.
**** Converted to data? Not likely, because Red/Blue/FR/LG brings us Lavender Town's haunted tower, which has gravestones to remember the ''dead Pokemon''. A woman was shown grieving over her dead Pokemon. Therefore, Pokemon can die in the Pokemon Universe, we just never get to experience it firsthand, because I doubt that the creators would like to traumatize young players with the death of their own, or their opponents Pokemon. I say that they get an offscreen death.
*** How many of those died in your trainer battles though? When done "right" ___takes too much, gets called back into virtual Poke Ball world then gets healed later. Most visible in Battle Revolution where after the HP bar is depleted the opponent will just signal it can't fight and then be recalled. Assuming you aren't out to kill like Team Rocket was with Marowak, Joltik should be fine. Even if you are, in theory the opponent could still save their Pokémon by recalling it quick enough (then running from you).
** It's Pokemon. Like most other works of fiction, it is highly unaffected by real-world physics. You want to know what happens when you use a level 100 Mewtwo against a Level 2 Weedle? It faints in 10 seconds flat and you get miniscule experience. Technically, that was a randomly generated piece of code that no matter what is just erased from existing.
*** Um... miniscule experience? If Mewtwo is level 100 it would gain ''no'' experience.
*** "Don't over-think it", in other words?
** Mewtwo sees how weak its foe is, holds back, and CherryTaps it. A telekinetic flick of the finger is enough for something so weak.
*** That one reminds me of the second Johto episode, where Charizard beat Casey's Pidgey by breathing on it.
*** That theory makes sense. Using recoil moves, you'll notice that the recoil is based on damage dealt (usually 1/4 or 1/2 depending on the move). OHKO'ing a weak Pokémon with a recoil move will lead to less recoil damage, with an implication that the attacking Pokémon is holding back.
** Simple - the Psychic attack affects the Pokémon until the moment it faints, which occurs extremely rapidly. After that, no consciousness means no further effect of the attack on the Pokémon.
** The Pokemon stomps NEXT to the Joltik and the resulting shockwave K.O.s the Joltik.
** See [[http://brawlinthefamily.keenspot.com/2010/09/27/275-hyper-beam/ here.]] I'd say that's an accurate representation.
** Once you've trained Mewtwo to listen to your instructions, he attacks exactly as strongly as you want him to.
**** The Pokémon games work partially on cartoon physics. While I wouldn't know how Tex Avery or Bob Clampett would handle hard-hitting psychic attacks, you DO see Pokémon flattened like pancakes and getting knocked out in that way, which would likely be what happens with the Joltik examples. You can also see squashing and stretching in the 3-D animation for Pokémon games, as well as the BigBallOfViolence when using Play Rough.
* How the hell is Altaria supposed to be a Dragon-type? It doesn't have any draconic properties at all! Is there some sort of obscure myth that I'm missing? Bulbapedia says something about the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Epsilon_Draconis star]] its Japanese name is based off being in the constellation Draco, but the name alone doesn't seem good enough to justify it.
** They were probably in need of more Dragons in Gen. III, and it was the closest thing to a dragon in the list. Really, it's already been brought up somewhere above...
** It's probably could be based of a Peng, a mythological Bird with colourful cloud wings; they tend to be portrayed with a dragon's head. It's not a bad thing to think outside of the box.
** I always thought it was a way to point out that birds descended from dinosaurs. A harebrained way, sure, but a way nonetheless.
* The Pokémon archipelago seems to be too small for the amount of life it has. Specially considering even the insects are at least the size of a human's foot...
** The first four regions in the core Pokemon games are all based on regions of Japan. Kanto is, well, Kanto. Johto is part of the Kansai region. Hoenn is Kyushu on its side. And Sinnoh is Hokkaido. Japan in real life has over 127,500,000 people living on a mountainous series of islands whose total landmass is about the same as California's.
** ...GameplayAndStorySegregation? I always assumed there weren't ''really'' that many Pokémon around, but you can find however many you want simply for LevelGrinding or dex completion.
* The huge trading machine. I can understand its existence in the games, but in the anime? When Ash trades his Butterfree for a Raticate, a stupid and out of character move, but that's beside the point for now, they both go through this really complex machine. Why not just, you know, do it by hand, and hand over the Butterfree while he hands over the Raticate?
** Probably Poké Balls have digital information (headers, maybe) imbued in them, or even the Pokémon themselves, making them prone to act up when handled by the wrong user. That, or they were aiming for making it look more like the games, instead of aiming for realism.
** On top of that, it's this same mechanic, most likely, that makes Shadow Pokemon in Colosseum and XD irredeemable by conventional means - they've been corrupted to the point that they'd follow the trainer designated as their owner despite any acts of immorality. It should stand to reason that a Snag Machine allows the user to take a Pokemon designated as "owned" by overwriting this information via a pirate signal. How the hell could you justify that if you could just trade Pokémon by simply passing the balls back and forth?
*** Random people giving you a Eevee/Porygon/Beldum just like that in the games makes the machine look entirely pointless, though.
**** But did those people ever use those Pokémon in battle? Was battle ever required to capture them? Maybe in the world of the games, ownership through a Pokéball is based on whether they're used in battle or not. If their previous owner wasn't a "trainer" per se (never actually had them battle against others for EXP), wouldn't it make sense that it would gain only YOUR trainer ID when it's given to you?
**** That point cannot be used. What if I hatched an egg and never used it in battle? Sure, I hatched it, but like the [=NPCs=], I've never actually used it in battle.
***** Doesn't matter if you used it or not. Your OT and ID are registered regardless. NPC gifts are GameplayAndStorySegregation.
**** Alternately the Trainer ID is recorded in a Poke Ball only when the Poke Ball is owned by a trainer with a Pokedex and who are officially recognized as a trainer by the Pokemon League. Works for both Anime and Games.
** It's probably something to do with the PC. Trainer information, switches the chip over. Pokémon are your sentient wards and companions, swapping pokémon is somewhere between swapping dogs and swapping children. You could just swap if you wanted, but the law's not gonna recognise it. Umpteen million Pokémon flitting through cyberspace, records have to be flawless. Swap pokéballs and you're holding your friend's pokéball for a bit. Put them through the machine and the new Pokémon belongs to you. It's registered to your ID, it's officially yours. Mundane, clerical, but essential.
* In the Pokémon Special manga, during the Ruby/Sapphire arc, Hoenn was in mortal danger because of Kyogre and Groudon's fighting. Why, then, did Norman make Wally fight his way up 50 or so crumbling floors, which could not have taken a small amount of time, so he could help summon Rayquaza? Why not just fly him up there, as Norman was pretty clearly able to do so with that Flygon he had? I know, Rule of Cool and all, but it just seems like it was a big waste of time.
** The point was not to get to the top of the tower directly, as it would be a big waste of time. Norman was intent on ''training'' Wally instead, and a do-or-die scenario was the best he could do given the circumstances. If Wally couldn't rise to the challenge, he couldn't succeed as a trainer, end of story, and Norman has been shown to be the TrainingFromHell kind of guy.
*** WhatTheHellHero! TrainingFromHell is bad and all, but to stake the entire world on that? That's a bit too far, and Norman should've known that. If the entire world was in danger and you only had so much time before everything went ka-boom, would you rather risk your butt climbing up 50 floors and waste a whole lot of time or even lose all the time you had, or fly up there in a fraction of the time and save the effort and the world?
**** Something along the lines of "that storm's too powerful, so we can't fly to Rayquaza, and I can't do it alone without a child's help, so I need to make you and your Pokémon strong enough to get up to the top." Makes sense if you think about it that way.
***** True; the fact that a sickly boy like Wally would've never had the physical stamina to make it if it wasn't for having to fight through all those floors is legitimate. Of course, Ruby would've probably had to do the same thing, so it's kinda unjustified. Nevertheless, not counting the fact that Rayquaza is summoned, it's all for naught in Wally's case, as he ends up presumably dead, Grovyle gets stolen by Guile, [[DeusExMachina Celebi]] teleports Ruru back to Ruby, and [[OriginalGeneration Emerald]] shows up to overwrite Wally's existence in the end, a la [[WhatHappenedToTheMouse the GS Ball.]]
* What happens when you use the Poke Ball on non-Pokemon? Can you capture humans in a Poke Ball? What about inanimate objects?
** At one point in the anime, Ash tried to catch a Mankey and instead accidentally sucked a rice ball into the Pokéball, but that may have just been a one time gag. Then again, in the games, items you find on the ground appear in the form of Poké Balls, so I think, at least in terms of the games, it is possible to store at least certain types of items in balls. As for people, who knows? Personally, I would like to think an object like that would not be made commercially available until it was proven that either humans cannot be sucked into them, or some kind of failsafe is built in to prevent it from happening. Otherwise, kidnappers would have a field day.
** In the anime continuity, at least, hitting a human with a Poké Ball doesn't do much. The return beam does act like a stunner, though. Given that there are fail-safes to prevent Poke Balls from even working on previously captured (and not yet released) Pokemon, it seems reasonable to assume that the tech doesn't even work on humans or is blocked. The anime and manga both have Poke Balls holding items, but they only seem to grab items smaller than they are, and not shrink them. Larger objects don't seem to get pulled in.
** One example, though certainly non-canon, of a human entering a Poke Ball is an old [=WB=] advertisement for the show where Ash gets sucked into a Poke Ball and finds [[RuleOfFunny a huge pile of his lost socks.]]
** Well, Jessie got hit by a Poke Ball, and she received a painful shock instead of getting sucked in.
** If the target receives the painful shock instead of the jerkass throwing the ball at them, it's probably not a coded failsafe rather than incidental incompatibility with human biology. Better that way, since a programmed failsafe could be hacked or reverse-engineered away.
** I remember hearing somewhere that a Poke Ball on its own doesn't have enough power to capture a human, but if you boost its power enough, by hooking it up to a [[ThereIsNoKillLikeOverkill nuclear power-station]] for example, it would be able to capture a human and then try to "correct" the error by turning the human into a Pokemon.
*** Try to find the source? That sounds like crazy fanfiction to me.
*** Oddly, I've heard the same, but I've never read Pokemon fanfiction. Maybe it was in a guide?
*** Or you both read the same fan-fic. There's no official source that even resembles what's stated above.
** I imagine that although you couldn't digitize non-Pokemon to shrink them into balls, if you could manually put an object in (open it and close it with your hands), it would hold it if it fit. Doesn't explain the Poke Balls inside the Poke Balls though...
*** Poke Balls in the anime are shown to be able to shrink to roughly the size of a golf ball so the trainer can easily place them on a belt/bandolier/whatever. The Poke Ball-ception is probably just a shrunken Poke Ball inside a full-size one.
**** [[http://awkwardzombie.com/index.php?page=0&comic=040411 Or the balls are actually the balls...]]
** ''Black 2'' and ''White 2'' prove that inanimate objects ''can'' be held in the balls- specifically, the props at Pokestar Studios.
*** Speaking of Black 2 and White 2, Monica was pulled into a ball in the PokéStar Studios film, "The Giant Woman!" To be fair, though, the ball was apparently cursed and it is a work of fiction in the Pokémon World...
* Why do Pokemon who are in love with their opponent (after having been Attracted) continue to waste turns immobilized by love [[FridgeLogic even when their object of affection is beating the crap out of them?]]
** LoveMartyr.
** They think the enemy is Tsundere.
** Attract appears to work a like a LovePotion ray. It inhibits rational thought. Whether or not your Pokemon attacks depends on whether or not it can reassert itself.
* Why don't some Wild Pokemon have egg moves? I mean, seeing a wild Sneasel with Ice Punch isn't exactly impossible. If the Pokemon can have [[HotSkittyOnWailordAction nonsensical partners]] in the Day Care, they should be able to have them in the wild.
** They could, but presumably they don't. I guess Pokémon naturally prefer to mate with their own kind. After all, note that you'll usually find more than one of the same type of Pokémon in any area. This probably means that they stick together in herds and flocks, so there would always be breeding partners available right there.
** As for the Sneasel with Ice Punch, that's actually pretty danged unlikely. Only the Buneary Line or a Delibird can pass that on to Sneasel, and they only learn it through breeding themselves. So to get a Sneasel with Ice Punch, a wild Medicham or Hitmonchan or something