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Headscratchers: Mad Max
All the MFP officers wear leather motorcycle clothing, yet only Goose is ever shown on a motorcycle. Anyone have an explanation for this?
  • It's possible they're all motorcycle cops, and there's a regular rotation of officers between bikes and cars, to reduce strain on officers from constantly riding a bike. In a deleted scene, Goose and Max switch vehicles and have a drag race.
    • They seem to crash their vehicles quite often. Protective clothing might be a good idea against bruises, burns etc. Also, black leather has at times been part of some forces regular uniforms.

When Max gets his arm run over by Toecutter, he's reaching for his sawn-off shotgun, yet all MFP officers carry a Smith & Wesson Model 28, yet he doesn't simply use that.
  • He was probably used to using the shotgun, which is why the revolver is not seen, or at least is not obvious, in the sequel.
  • No no, he only uses the shotgun during his Roaring Rampage of Revenge. It's more likely that .357 Magnum ammo is a tad more scarce than 12 gauge rounds in the Mad Max verse.
    • Yet he seems to ignore it when his shotgun is just out of reach, allowing Toe Cutter to run over his arm, when the world is only just beginning to break down and ammunition is still being issued by MFP (by the way, .357 revolvers will accept .38 Special rounds, by virtue of the .357 being longer). In fact, the only time his revolver is seen unholstered is when Max's infant son is seen playing with it in the background before he leaves for the station and another three days of service.
      • He just had his main hand run over and he needs to make a shot that probably means life or death to him. It's much easier hitting something with a shot gun, especially with his off-hand and pulling the revolver might take longer time.
      • Not exactly. He had his upper arm (not hand) run over because he was reaching for the shotgun.
    • Given the number of weapons MFP issues (12 gauge VG Bently (double barrel) and Winchester Model 1912 (pump action) shotguns, Winchester Model 70 in .30-'06, and the Smith and Wessen) plus Goose draws his when they find Johnny and the girl, and the number of vehicles they maintain and the fact they have the money to modify a Pursuit Special to retain one patrolman (which the commisioner is not happy about), and that society is just starting to breakdown, but everything is well before the end and industry is still in place, it seems unlikely at best they couldn't afford or find ammunition for their sidearms, to say nothing of the notion they would issue a weapon without any ammunition available. A real department is not going to spend the money to issue a weapon if no ammunition is available or affordable when that it could be better spent elsewhere, such as a sidearm they can readily supply ammunition or more ammunition for their other weapons.

      For those wondering where the sawn off came from, it's a VG Bently, one of MFP's standard issue weapons. In an extended version of the film, he takes the Model 28 and shotgun and several boxes of .357 and 12 Gauge ammunition from the MFP armoury and, while not explicitly shown, he saws off the barrel and stock when he goes after the gang (although the shotgun he takes is a pump action, which is probably why they left this scene out).

  • In the beginning of The Road Warrior, Max pulls out his shotgun when it looks like Wes is about to attack him. Max knew fully well that his shotgun was empty. He surely must have also known that it wouldn't have worked as a Weapon for Intimidation on a guy like Wes the same way it worked for the Gyro pilot. So why did he bother?
    • No one willingly tangles with a shotgun, so Wez didn't need much of an excuse to leave Max alone. If anything, Wez probably figured he could round up a few more members of the gang and come back for another round, since Max seemed to be a new arrival to the neighborhood.
MacheteHeadscratchers/FilmMad Max: Beyond Thunderdome

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