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Headscratchers: Frozen
WARNING: This page is spoilerific. It's best to watch the movie before reading this page. You have been warned.

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    It seems the perfect opportunity 
  • Why didn't Hans let the Duke's guard kill Elsa? He implied that he was going to do so anyways. If he didn't want to kill her unless there was no other choice, then why would he be willing to accelerate Anna's death? If he's worried that Anna would reject him, that doesn't make sense since he wasn't the one who killed her, and he could further manipulate her emotions. If he wanted to kill Elsa himself to get the glory, it wouldn't make sense since the executioner would have done so, and if the Guard killed Elsa for him, he would have gotten credit for leading the crew to her.
    • He wanted her to end the winter conditions she created. After learning that she couldn't, he decided to tie up a loose end. Accelerating Anna's death would also tie up another, much larger, loose end. The fact that she was still breathing would prove everything he said false and make things end very badly for him.
    • It was rational to believe that Snow Queen Elsa was the source of the freak winter, and thus destroying the cause would halt the effects. Since the source was a person, how does one stop it? The source either had conscious control or not. Snow Queen Elsa did not and nothing could be done to stop her. As this was the case, it would be the most logical to kill her. The rag-tag military did not know that. They probably assumed she had control over it. This means that she would choose whether or not to create or continue the adverse weather. If she was a benevolent queen (which she was), she would have never created the storm in the first place. If she was malevolent enough to slowly doom a land in a slow, cold death, she could not be reasoned with to end the suffering. If one of the objectives of the mission was to find an end to the winter, then killing the Snow Queen would be the the only reasonable course of action. There was no reasoning with her, and keeping her alive and later imprisoned up was senseless.
    • Alternatively, he was afraid that being even indirectly involved in her sister's death would cause Anna to hate him (which was likely to happen). This would ruin his plan to marry Anna in order to become king.
    • There is also that at that point he didn't know if Anna was even alive, and since they haven't actually married yet, he needs Elsa if he's going to be king.
    • Considering how socially deprived and emotionally unstable Princess Anna was on the day of the coronation, Princess Anna would have been even more likely to collapse into the closest (apparent) loved one's arms and they would be running to the altar.
    • Though wouldn't putting him in charge while Anna is gone be enough for him to claim to be the legal heir?
    • No. It would probably be enough to give him a place in the coming succession dispute, but it wouldn't bypass the dispute entirely the way a marriage would.
    • Prince Hans seems to have the idea that Elsa that too distant and antisocial to be interacted with on an informal level, yet alone wooed.
      • Though 'saving her from herself' would have been an excellent first step toward winning her over.
    • He wasn't yet in a position where her death would benefit him. Anna was missing, possibly dead, and if the throne became vacant before he had a solid claim to it, all his scheming would be in vain. Therefore, he needed to keep Elsa alive at least until he knew what had happened to Anna.
    • Queen Elsa's death at any time following his engagement to Princess Anna would be opportune. The reigning queen would be gone, and the spare he would marry would ascend the throne.
    • In short, killing Elsa was Hans' Plan B (or possibly his Plan C, D, or E), and when he confronted her in the ice palace, he was still on Plan A (to bring her back alive and convince her to undo the endless winter).
    • Snow Queen Elsa was obviously the source of the winter. She may or may not have been able to consciously control the weather. Snow Queen Elsa could not have just "turned it off". But if it is assumed she had control over her cryokinetic powers, she either would have never caused the freak storm in the first place because she was benevolent or would be too malevolent and cruel to be reasoned into halting the winter.
    • But Hans couldn't have known that at the time, and he didn't decide to kill Elsa until he did know.
    • But Prince Hans did know that the Snow Queen is either benevolent or malevolent. If she was benevolent, she would have never caused the storm in the first place. If she was malevolent, there would be no reasoning with her. In reality, Snow Queen Elsa did not know how to stop the winter, and thus any communication was a lost cause in ending the winter.
      • That's a False Dichotomy. Accidentally causing the Endless Winter was neither benevolent nor malevolent, and Hans may well have known that. Besides, he needed incontrovertible proof that Elsa was beyond reasoning before he could afford to kill her; and as of the fight in the ice palace, he didn't have it.
      • Anybody could presume either Snow Queen Elsa could end the winter or couldn't. If Snow Queen Elsa could, she would be too irrational to convince ending the winter. But, she couldn't. Therefore, in either case, any effort would be in vain.
      • Hans is nothing if not a Villain with Good Publicity, and he would get more Good Publicity for Defrosting Ice Queen (or at least trying to) than for outright killing her without even trying to Defrost her. And he WAS successful in dissuading her from killing the Wesselton soldiers, which proved that she could possibly be reasoned with.
      • Prince Hans did not have any proof either way later and still forged ahead with his regicide scheme.
      • Elsa outright told Hans that she couldn't undo it; so yes, he did have proof.
      • Prince Hans did not have proof that killing Snow Queen Elsa would seize the winter.
  • It's also possible that he worried that killing her might make things worse: that might suggest that other magical beings killed in the past have brought on a Taking You with Me which would have left him in the blast zone.
    • Prince Hans had no problem with trying to assassinate Queen Elsa later on the fjord, when things were already as bad as they could possibly get.

    Troll memory magic! How doth ye work? 
  • So to cure Anna, the troll removed memories of Elsa's magic and told the parents not to reveal Elsa's powers. Therefore when Anna witnessed Elsa creating ice, how come she is not affected by it at all? Or is it because the curse had passed already?
    • This may have been a case of Plausible Deniability. If even the king's younger daughter doesn't know the secret, it's less likely it will get out before Elsa can get control of it. Though naturally this fails.
    • I took it as more her being protective of her sister, and trying to give her a chance to explain it, not to mention trying to assuage the situation so no one got hurt. Basically, smooth it all out now, then we can think about freaking out.
    • The bigger question: why exactly is "no memories of magic" a cure for magically inflicted frostbolt? It's one thing if it like, "oh, you're injured by ice magic, here's a warmth spell that will take care of it, or here's a Holy Light spell that will cure it." Magic designed to heal/oppose used to remove negative detrimental effects of other magic, fine. But what does memories have to do with anything? Does Troll magic just run on Equivalent Exchange or something?
    • I doubt it was a requirement for the cure so much as an effort to keep Anna from blabbing about Elsa's powers or bugging her for a repeat performance. Well-meaning, but not the best idea.
    • Anna's first injury could also have been a mind-based counterpart to the freezing of her heart later in the movie. The cure in the latter case was metaphorical, an act of true love, rather than some physical thing. Possibly it was the same the first time; Elsa's misaimed spell hurt Anna's mind, not her body, and removing her memories allowed the trolls to "change her mind," and heal the damage.
    • This makes sense to me too. Note the way Pabbie said, "The heart is hard to change, but the head can be persuaded."
    • Indeed, it might be like the effect of the Magic Mirror shard in the original story — if you get a shard of it in your eye or heart, you can't see any of the good in the world, and you become bitter and cruel. A strike to the head with ice magic might not kill Anna, but leave her with a "cold" attitude towards the world, and removing her memory of the strike and of the magic is the best way to counter that.
    • Alternately, the troll was simply concerned that Anna remembering, "MY SISTER ALMOST KILLED ME" might be more trauma than a young child could take, and might ruin their relationship. How would Elsa have turned out if Anna had grown up harboring "My sister is a monster" thoughts?
    • Ah, but just because Anna is younger doesn't mean she'd behave like the Duke of Weaseltown did later on. A more likely outcome, had her memories not been erased, Anna would feel bad about jumping off the snowpiles too fast, and even if it meant continuing to endanger herself, would persist in trying to be as close to Elsa as possible. The trolls were thus more likely concerned that Anna would take another hit, this time to a less curable part of herself (which ends up happening anyway, thirteen years later).
  • I interpreted it as them needing to remove the ice magic from her head, which included the magic in her memories.
  • While not clear at first, it became rather self-explanatory after Elsa accidentally froze Anna's heart. When they were children, Elsa froze her mind. Basically, what the troll's magic was tell the mind "No, you weren't frozen. You're fine". The heart, however, is not so easily convinced.
    • In fact that would be why he alters the memories to say that the snow was natural: if the head 'knows' that ice-magic is impossible it won't be hurt by it, because the head (unlike the heart) is logical like that.

     So who was boss? 
  • So who ran Arendelle during the time period in between the King and Queens' deaths and Elsa becoming eligible for regency? And how long was it? It looks like it might have been maybe 5 years tops. (Anna and Elsa didn't look very young when their parents left.) Is Arrendele a relatively small city-state that could run itself until they work with international trade?
    • Actually, "regency" means that a minister or another member of the royal family rules in the stead of an underage heir to the throne, guiding them and helping them grow into their role (ideally). This is probably exactly what happened; we just never met whoever ruled as Regent.
    • In fact when you think about it - Elsa was 21 when the movie takes place, and the parents died three years ago, meaning she would have been 18. She'd have been old enough to rule in her own right for those three years, she just didn't have a coronation until three years later, for whatever reason. Similar to Queen Elizabeth II - she ascended to the throne in 1952, but didn't have a coronation until 1953. Moreover, Alfonso XI of Castile, for example, was declared an adult, and began to reign himself being 15 years-old, in 1325, but was not crowned until 1332. Therefore, Elsa might have gone through all the legal processes of becoming queen, and delayed the most showy part of being coronated as long as possible by claiming to still be grieving, or that she was too busy, and so on.
    • She probably wanted to put it off until she was entirely done grieving because having a large public event while she's emotionally compromised (and given that's the sort of state she's most likely to create a huge humiliating ice display in) would probably be a bad idea. In fact, if Hans hadn't showed up, that day would probably have gone smoothly and Elsa could have ended up holding in that 'eternal winter' thing for years, which could have had even more disastrous consequences.
      • 18 hasn't always been considered the age of majority (it still isn't in some places—in Japan it's 20). During the 19th Century when the movie takes place, it actually would have been 21.
    • Word of God has stated that there was originally a regent character who ruled the kingdom until Elsa's coronation, but he was ultimately cut from the film because it was determined that he was unimportant to the overall story.
  • If there was a regent, did they know about Elsa's powers? Even if the King and Queen were trying to keep Elsa's powers a secret, they needed someone to look after Elsa once they died. How could the regent do their job, if they didn't know about Elsa? Or did Elsa manage to keep her powers a secret for three years and the regent never thought it was suspicious that the royal palace was closed off?
    • Given her age at the start of the film, she would have been a young adult at the point when her parents died, so it's likely that the regent's functions would have been limited to running the kingdom. As for her behavior, that would definitely seem strange, but there are a lot of non-magical explanations for it (including grieving for her dead parents). For one, since she was the heir apparent to the throne, it wouldn't be hard for her to develop a paranoid obsession with the possibility of being assassinated by a usurper. Even though this is a Disney movie Hans' plot makes it seem likely that political assassinations are far from inconceivable.

    Freeze time you so wonky! 
  • This may be obvious, but if Anna's sacrifice is what broke her curse, shouldn't she have been healed before her whole body froze? Unless there's some Rule of Drama in effect...
    • I assumed that it was Elsa crying over the sacrifice that was the act of love required. This would fit with the source material, where a shard of mirror comes out of Kai's eye when he cries due to Gerda's expression of love for him.
    • Chalk it up to Rule of Drama and Rule of Cool.
    • I saw it as her making the sacrifice at just the right moment. Exactly as the freezing was complete, but at the point when the curse could still be broken. A perfect in-between. Which, yes, is Rule of Drama and Rule of Cool.
    • Another interpretation is that Anna started thawing from the inside (heart magic and all that) and it simply took a while for her body to thaw completely. If memory serves, in the opening scene, Anna wasn't instantly healed — it took a few seconds.
    • Which makes some sense, since her chest was the first (external) part of her body to thaw.
    • Another thing to note is the shockwave which knocked back Hans after the freeze. None of Elsa's magic has had shockwaves included. Wind yes, shock, no. The shockwave was the beginning of Anna's thaw.
    • You can also see it as that, because it was actually Elsa's frozen heart that needed mending, it wasn't until Anna was frozen that Elsa realized how much Anna loved her and vice versa. So, it was only after Anna was frozen that the full magic could be completed when Elsa openly and fully expressed her love for Anna. When she heard Anna had died, she blamed herself because she knew she loved Anna but thought Anna only cared out of sisterly duty.
    • True love, after all, requires reciprocation.
    • It does take a whole ton of mental devotion to willingly put oneself in front of an incoming sword and stay there. It was only when there was no longer a possibility for Anna to back away out of fear that it was truly certain how much she loved Elsa.

     Why build him? 
  • Why did Elsa create Olaf during her musical number and then just leave him there? She was obviously surprised to see him walking and talking later when Anna brought him with her, so she didn't plan on bringing him to life. And why did he wander off instead of following her to the castle? Also, if he and Elsa never spoke until then, how did Olaf know who she was and what his name was supposed to be?
    • On that note, how did Olaf know what summer is, but not what heat does to frozen things?
    • Not trying to jump to conclusions, but did you miss the first 5 minutes of the movie or something? In the very beginning of the movie, when the two sisters were kids, there was a brief scene where we see them build a snowman whom they called Olaf. This was the same snowman that Elsa unconsciously brought to life later in the film. Anna was surprised when first encountering him because he was a long lost childhood memory suddenly brought to life, while Elsa was surprised to see him for the same reason plus the fact that she realized she has the power to bring life to snow. In the musical number, you can see her build Olaf, but he was lifeless at the time and she just assumed she was building the same normal snowman just to test her powers again. Olaf probably came to life much later and was probably too far away from Elsa's castle to know anything about it. From being with Anna, Olaf knew about her sister Elsa before being formally introduced with her.
    • To answer the second question, it's simply because of his innocence and never experiencing Summer for himself. He's just heard about this thing called Summer (No idea where he heard about Summer in the first place) and no one told him about what heat does to snow.
    • I assumed Olaf wanted to know what summer was like and knew about what it was because, y'know, he was built in summer. I also thought that he was built totally subconsciously, since Olaf was one of the last things she built with her magic back when she obviously had control over it (I mean, it's obvious that wasn't the first time she turned the ballroom into her own personal winter playground, and since it wasn't always frozen over as we see when she enters it and since natural heat doesn't melt her snow, she had control over it at one point.)
    • Natural heat melts her snow just fine, as Olaf demonstrates with the fireplace.
    • Well, Olaf was given basic intelligence to speak so I would assume that includes other basic facts. He might know that a donkey is some sort of weird animal but he hasn't seen it so he doesn't know what it truly looks like.
    • Elsa builds Olaf when she's in a good mood for the first time in years, and since her powers seem to be enhanced and more controllable when she's in a better mood, it's good fairytale logic (this is a story about a magic witchy ice queen, remember) that the first thing she'd build with her new sense of power and freedom would be a snowman so perfect that he came to life.
    • Olaf represents the love and good times of her childhood with her sister, the last time she felt happy (he's the snowman they made at the time). It's not a coincidence that he's the first thing she created when feeling truly happy and free again.
    • Following the idea above, Olaf is the snowman Anna has begged Elsa to build over the past 13 years as seeing in "Do you want to build a snowman". Now without fear of using her powers, she builds the snowman, maybe thinking in Anna and the good old times they spend together.
    • A character defined by Power Incontinence doing something unintentionally isn't that surprising.
  • On another note, where did the coal and sticks come from? Elsa's ice/snow powers could create a snowman of course, but where did she get the sticks and coal? When she builds him as a child, even a carrot appears.
    • Seeing as the little girls obviously do this regularly, they probably had the accessories stashed somewhere. Elsa makes the snow but the girls build him by hand, and we see Elsa 'dressing' him with the coal. So it's probably mundane coal and sticks that they found in a fireplace (and those will be literally everywhere in the castle), and 'Olaf's nose' comes from the kitchens and Elsa maybe stashes it in the nearest coal bucket ready for use.

    So where did Elsa's magic come from anyway? 
  • Why was Elsa born with magical powers? The promotional materials say something about a prophecy, but there's no explanation given in the movie. She was just born with them, and that was that.
    • Being born with magical abilities is a fairly standard fantasy trope. Heck, an entire class in Dungeons & Dragons, the sorcerer, is based on it. Maybe the royal bloodline has fairy blood in it, or maybe one of their ancestors was a demigod.
    • To expand on this, Pathfinder actually added in magical bloodlines that grant extra powers based on what kind of magical blood you have. Elsa is a classic example of a Cold Elemental Sorcerer, meaning that somewhere in the royal bloodline, raw elemental magic was introduced.
    • Not everything in a story needs an explanation.
    • This troper thought that it fit into the moral of the story better — Elsa has to learn to live with her powers. People are randomly born with things that may make them act like she was. If you add an explanation, it would defeat the purpose of being yourself — we may as well add an explanation for homosexuality or the like.
    • This promotional aspect might possibility been a product of What Could Have Been, as the story did used to feature a prophecy.
    • The troll in the beginning asks if Elsa was born with the magic or cursed. Given that Rapunzel is in the movie, there's a certain amount of "magic is just part of the world" going on.
    • So if magic is part of the world, then why were her parents so concerned with not letting people know about it?! Couldn't the king have sought a sorcerer to teach Elsa how to control her power? Why do the other nobles automatically assume Elsa is evil, without giving her the benefit of the doubt? A lot of this plot seems really contrived.
    • Because unlike say the Light Magic like Rapunzel had, ice and snow isn't always good. It can be incredibly destructive, as Elsa and all of Arendelle learned the hard way.
    • Because they misinterpreted Grand Pabbie's words that "Fear would be her enemy" to mean that people would be afraid of her, hence her powers should be concealed for her own protection. And really, it's mainly the Duke of Weselton throughout who fears her evil, evil magic - most of the other nobles are just shocked.
    • As mentioned, Rapunzel and Eugene are in the movie. Remember what happened to Rapunzel? It's not out of the realm to imagine the same happening to Elsa.
    • Just because something exists in the world does not mean that people are tolerant of it existing. To offer a comparison, homosexuality exists in our world, but that has not always equalled a tolerant attitude towards homosexuality. Elsa's parents were concerned about people finding out about Elsa's magic because they were afraid that people would think that she was some kind of evil witch and hate and persecute her for her powers. And really, given how quick people were to believe that she was some kind of evil witch (albeit mainly because Elsa panicked and fled without actually trying to offer an explanation — not entirely without reason) to the point of locking her up and trying to kill her, it turns out they weren't entirely wrong to fear this kind of reaction.
    • One of the main reasons people have hated on things that are different is because of how they could be a potential threat. Elsa is outright dangerous at that point, the fact that her parents limited the staff after she became considered such is a sign that they weren't big on hiding the truth when her powers were benign. The "no people ever" rule was designed to be a temporary measure until Elsa got control, only she never did and began to look at life as if she never would.
    • Also, the Tangled/Frozen universe HAS magic, but it is extremely rare. It's not one-sorcerer-per-adventuring-party, it's rare-to-the-point-of-mythical magic. Note that the king and queen taught Elsa to hide her magic and control it with Stoicism instead of trying to find Elsa a teacher, which would be the logical solution in even a rare-magic setting.
    • Even if magic is just rare, something like what's seen in the movie might be an extreme aberration. With Rapunzel's magical abilities, she is able to keep a person alive for a while, potentially extending that to an indefinite period if they have regular access to her abilities. While that's obviously more than just a nifty trick, Elsa's ability to unconsciously drag an entire country into a potentially never-ending winter, to build an enormous ice palace, and to create living, intelligent beings is on a whole other level. People might fear her abilities because, even if they've seen magic before, her powers are just a step below those of a Reality Warper. If she were a less benign character, a conscious effort on her part could potentially kill millions of people through direct hypothermia and through famine.
    • Could be that Elsa's a Conduit.
    • Think of it this way: what would have happened if Elsa didn't possess her powers? Her parents die, she becomes Queen, Hans appears and marries her (or Anna, followed by creating an "accident" for Elsa) then Arendelle falls under the power of a malevolent, villainous king who is then succeeded by a long line of malevolent kings/queens. So, if you're any sort of "greater power" in the Disney universe - what do you do? Disney's often about greater good coming from bad or sacrificing lesser good. To quote Spock: "have faith...that the universe will unfold, as it should". Or to quote Gandalf: "there are other powers in this world beside the will of evil...". Elsa was supposed to get her powers. Her powers were a gift that changed the natural course of the universe for the better. Her powers weren't just a gift to her, they rescue all of Arendelle from Hans' plot, sacrificing Elsa and Anna's happy childhoods in exchange for the kingdom's ultimate freedom. The power of good is just sneaky that way - all convoluted and subtle, but it knows what it's doing.
  • The answer to the original question, of course, is the X-Gene.
  • It was confirmed in an interview with Jennifer Lee that it was going to be explained by a troll narrator that every time there's a certain alignment of Saturn, a child is born with ice magic 1,000 years later, but she eventually decided to just say she was born with them and leave it at that to avoid it sounding too complicated. In a way, since Elsa was born on some alignment of Saturn, it actually makes a lot of sense. Why? Well, what are Saturn's rings made of? Rock and ice. Even more significant, what is one of Saturn's moons? Enceladus, a world covered entirely in ice. Probably one of the few times a specific planetary alignment actually makes sense. (As for the "prophecy" thing mentioned in the original question, the prophecy was about the whole "A ruler with a frozen heart" thing and stuff about a "sword sacrifice", so I think this can still be stated as the confirmed circumstances.)
  • Considering it draws from norse mythology, it might be that the ancestry of Arendelle's royal family traces back to the Frost Giants of the legend, and sometimes a member of the family is born with stronger giant blood, bestowing him/her with power over the Frost.

     Anna, you didn't think that one through, did you? 
  • Okay, so even though Anna knows for a fact that Elsa's powers are triggered when she gets scared or stressed out, she decides that it would be a good idea to tell Elsa that she accidentally trapped her hometown in an eternal winter. What exactly did she expect that Elsa's emotional response to that news would be?
    • Actually Anna doesn't understand how Elsa's powers work, not in the slightest. Though that doesn't explain why she thought it was a good idea to keep insisting she come home when snow started blowing around the room.
    • When has Anna ever paid attention to the details? This is the girl who was going to marry a man she just met, rushed out into the wilderness without properly preparing (Honestly, she was lucky to have stumbled unto Oaken's shop), and threw a snowball at a giant snowman when Kristoff specifically told her not to do.
    • Because a) Anna didn't know about the childhood accident, so she didn't know her presence was especially upsetting for Elsa; b) she hadn't seen how immediately dangerous Elsa's powers could be; eternal winter won't kill you on the spot, and during the party scene, Elsa's ice spikes didn't hurt anyone; c) she wasn't insisting Elsa come home at that point, she was trying to calm her down ("you don't have to be afraid", "we can work this out together", "don't panic"). It would have been smarter to back off and let Elsa get over the initial rush of panic, yes, but there is no explanation required for why touchy-feely and kinda ditzy Anna wanted to be close to her panicking and vulnerable sister.
    • To answer the first point, she saw Elsa's powers go off when she was freaked out at the castle, so she knows they respond to Elsa's emotions.
    • Not necessarily- sure, Elsa's outburst in the ballroom looked like she'd done it because she lost her temper- but not necessarily like it was totally involuntary. Elsa's horrified body language could have read as instant regret at what she'd done in anger, without anyone realising that was total Power Incontinence (after all, getting so angry that you hit someone- even if you'd never normally be violent- doesn't mean you have no control of what your hands do)
    • Would it really be better to delay telling Elsa about Arendelle's situation, whatever the risk? When Elsa is the only one who might be able to help?
    • Yeah, I pretty much agree with the above that Anna had to explain because it was a time-sensitive problem. Also, Anna clearly expected Elsa's emotional response to be exactly what it was. She's stalling and visibly cringing when she explains the eternal winter to Elsa. It seems like the issue was that Anna only realized Elsa didn't know about the eternal winter during their conversation in the castle (there may be spoken dialogue I've forgotten that contradicts this, but her dialogue in the song does seem like she initially assumed Elsa knows about the problem but is too scared to come back and/or fix it), so she had like thirty seconds to figure out how to explain it tactfully, and failed to do so before her mouth got ahead of her brain and she blurted it out.
    • Anna went up there assuming Elsa would be able to reverse the winter. She thought Elsa could control her powers at that point. She didn't realise Elsa had no idea how to thaw her own ice. Either she had thought Elsa already knew about the frozen kingdom or else she had to reluctantly break the news to her then and there.
    • Anna's motive is largely a selfish one. She finally knows what's wrong, and she thinks that means that now she can be in her sister's heart (and in her space, through the door) and that will fix everything, because for Anna, that WILL fix everything she thinks is wrong. But Elsa's problem is more complicated. Only Elsa can solve it, and Anna's *desire* for her to fix things isn't enough motive for Elsa to break through her fear. Desire still leaves room for Elsa's fear, fear of letting Anna and everyone down. It isn't until Anna unconditionally loves Elsa that Elsa has room to understand what she needs to do.
    • Anna knew exactly what Elsa's response would be. Pay attention to her face during that entire scene; she's very reluctant to actually tell Elsa what's going on in Arendelle once it becomes apparent that Elsa doesn't know, keeps repeating the word "deep" while finding the strength to say "snow", and visibly winces as she finally says that word. She wanted to break it to her more gently, but Elsa kept playing the, "Everybody's safe and fine if you leave me alone, so I'm kicking you out of my ice palace and you will never get another chance at this if you don't blurt it out now!" card. She had to say it before Elsa slammed the door in her face, or nobody ever would.
    • Really, Anna must have figured out sooner that Elsa didn't know. While the two were talking before Olaf came in, Elsa said, "No, Anna, I belong here, alone. Where I can be who I am... without hurting anybody." And the look on Anna's face as she says, "Actually, about that-." clearly states that it had to have dawned on her. The whole purpose of the reprise of "For the First Time in Forever" was most likely to stop Elsa from pushing her sister away again long enough for Anna to tell her what's happening in Arendelle.
    • Anna's also very young and naive and doesn't know Elsa very well. When she first set out she didn't realise quite what a state of terror Elsa was in- she just thought that Elsa was furious at her, for her behaviour with Hans and the ensuing argument. Perhaps by the time she makes it to Elsa's balcony she's getting a bit more of an idea that Elsa's problems are bigger than that, but it seems to be what she thought when she first started looking for Elsa.
    • In short, the whole thing can basically be summed up in one word: impulsiveness. Anna simply doesn't think things through. It's a part of her character. Had she taken some time to think, her actions would've likely been wiser, such as shutting up instead of continually talking when her sister is beginning to have a panic attack.
    • Anna's plan seems to consist of just calming Elsa down and reassuring her that she's still wanted, on the assumption that she just needs to come home to get it all sorted out. Which isn't entirely stupid, and explains why Anna thought she was the best person to do it and should go up there without backup. It's not even like she was wholly wrong- being there for Elsa did turn out to be the solution, sorta.

    Was that really a good idea, Troll chief? 
  • Why did the troll remove Anna's memories and told Elsa's parents to hide her powers? If people around Elsa knew about her abilities, they would be more careful, they wouldn't force her to take off her gloves and would try to shield her from strong emotions. Yes, they would fear her, but at least chances of accidents (like the one that triggered the plot) would be reduced.
    • The trolls are actually kind of stupid and don't explain or think their instructions through very well. This happens later in the movie too, where they don't bother explaining that the source of true love to break a curse doesn't really matter.
    • What they say is that Elsa's powers have the potential to be dangerous, and that "Fear will be the enemy." The royals interpret this as meaning others will fear Elsa and she will be in danger until she can control her powers, but it's entirely possible that the troll was really refering to the fear Elsa and her parents had of her own abilities, and warning them not to do ... exactly what they did.
    • The "fear will be the enemy" line was followed by the Troll showing them an image of people fearing Elsa, causing her to be afraid, so it still fits — it's interesting because he's still not altogether that helpful, and in fact the King takes his advice in a much worse way than was probably intended. The Troll Chief recommends hiding the knowledge of her powers to prevent others from fearing her, but the King goes too far and hides the girl away from everyone. He also seems to not actually know the secret to controlling Elsa's powers, either, or else he'd have told them.
    • The troll does also specifically say that she needs to learn to control her abilities. The problem is that the king takes that to mean suppressing them instead of how to use them. If we use a bomb analogy, he thought of it as a deadman switch that needed to always be pressed instead of Elsa learning about bombs to be able to make pyrotechnics instead of explosives.
    • It seems possible that the trolls don't understand the situation very well, even if they understand it better than the human characters. Given the apparent age of the map that the king uses to find them (it's written with Scandinavian runes, which suggests that it predates the modern, cosmopolitan Arendelle shown in the film) and the fact that only the elderly Grand Pabbie knows even enough to hand out incomplete advice, it may have been a very, very long time since someone else was born with the same powers that Elsa has. In that case, every one of the trolls who has actually encountered a case like Elsa's could be long dead.
    • If Word of God by Jennifer Lee is anything to go by, it has been a very long time—likely 1000 years, in fact, at the least. Apparently a child would be born with ice magic 1000 years after Saturn was in alignment with something, which makes sense because, you know Saturn's rings are part ice and its moon Europa is an entire world made of ice (they just eventually decided to just say she was born with them and nothing else because, to quote Jennifer Lee, "the more you explained the more questions you had about magic and the rules"). And if we assume that that happens to only one child in the world and ice magic isn't genetic, the last one might not have even been anywhere near Arendelle. And according to the Essential Guide, Bulda (Kristoff's adoptive mother) is "700 years young". Assuming that the last child (maybe the original Snow Queen?) was born close to there and encountered the trolls as well, Grand Pabbie is likely the only one we see in the film who encountered the last one.

    Why doesn't it work every time? 
  • If True Love is supposedly what defrosts Elsa's ice, why didn't Anna get defrosted immediately after Elsa accidentally struck her in the beginning, and horrified, immediately rushed to her side? Clearly she showed deep concern and love for her sister (considering the song that they were best friends) and even at that young age, if she's powerful enough to create a ballroom flurry, why shouldn't the opposite be true? Furthermore, even though the film said an Act of True Lovenote  that ultimately caused the defrost, how did Elsa's love, by itself, defrost the world?
    • This is explicitly stated in the movie. An act of true love is for a frozen heart, but changing one's mind (via memories) is required for a frozen mind. Different problem, different cure.
    • This troper interpreted it as Anna had to perform an act of pure love for her to be healed and Elsa realizing that she was truly loved is what let her control her powers.
    • This is my interpretation too: if you have a frozen heart, then YOU have to be the one to love. The heart has to thaw itself, it can't be thawed from the outside. It's a wonderful Red Herring in the movie: the trolls' suggestion of a "True Love's kiss" brings to mind Snow White and Sleeping Beauty that were saved by others. Anna saved herself. (A True Love's kiss might have worked, but only because a proper kiss is mutual.) Even in the case of the frozen head, the troll says that the head "can be persuaded" to recover, which suggests that Anna's brain thawed itself, but with the troll's help.
    • In response to exhibit A, Perhaps it just took a moment for the magic to take hold? After all, she was FROZEN solid from her act, the magic finally taking over. Perhaps it just took a little bit for her heart to start thawing after such an utter chill? Or perhaps ala Beauty and the Beast, it wasn't until Elsa acknowledged her love for her sister in her embrace that the spell could complete. As for exhibit B, If Elsa's power activation was partially due to her fear, loneliness, and anger, perhaps the blizzard itself was a reaction to this. Thus realizing her love for her kingdom was what helped her thaw it all. Or perhaps she just realized that it was her joy that allowed her to fully control her powers, and thus began the great thaw off of that. After a climax like that, the writers possibly decided that it wasn't that important to dissect.
    • Except look at the way Elsa desperately grabbed to her sister after she struck her in the beginning? The way she clings to her fallen body is a pitch perfect mirror to how she clings to her frozen corpse at the end of the film — she clearly showed her love for her sister and was unabashed at hiding it.
    • The first time, Elsa's magic struck her in the head. That's the difference. It only needs an act of love when it's her heart.
    • Additionally, Elsa's primary emotion when rushing to her sister's side was one of fear and guilt. A junior version My God, What Have I Done?.
    • Maybe they needed two things needed to break the curse. One, was the selfless act and two, was that the person needed to acknowledge the act. Anna performed the selfless act and Elsa realized how Anna's sacrifice saved her life. Which is why Anna unfroze right after Elsa started crying all over her. Another example might be when Kristoff was rushing Anna back to Arendelle. Technically, that could count because Kristoff had already fallen for her and was willing to give her up. This should have broken her curse, except Anna didn't acknowledge it as an act of love because she was focused on Hans. Really, if the two had realized they were meant to be sooner, the last 25 minutes might have gone differently.
    • But then, wouldn't that completely detract from what a "Selfless Act" is? If Elsa's love for her sister needs to be acknowledged in order for her spell to be broken, it's not a selfless act. If a person needs to perform a selfless act and the other person needs to acknowledge that said person did it, is it still considered entirely act of true love? They're doing it specifically so a person can acknowledge it.
    • Ah, but Anna didn't know that she would be healed by doing so. If she was indeed trying to game the laws of magic by performing a "selfless" act in front of her sister, it probably wouldn't have worked, but this was an unintentional result. Anna thought she was running away from her salvation, so in her mind she was choosing her sister over herself.
    • If we want to get Mind Screw-y here, why wouldn't the parents' love for her daughter have been able to defrost the ice originally either? Going by the first two posters, Power Activation and selfless acts, why wouldn't the parents' deep concern for her daughter, in the history of Elsa being alive, have ever been able to defrost anything? True, one could make the argument that being sheltered wasn't exactly loving, but Elsa understood her parents motivation, definitively showed compassion for their training and was equally torn by their deaths.
    • That's slightly incorrect. "True Love" doesn't defrost everything Elsa has frozen over; it thaws a frozen heart. Elsa expanded on that and realized that love allowed her complete control over her powers.
    • There are ways to read this without appealing to magical rules. The troll chief says "an act of true love", not *any* act of true love. It wasn't some law of magic that saved Arendelle, just pure matters of the heart. Elsa has been constantly afraid, to some degree, for her entire life since she was 8. However, once Anna dies, Elsa has nothing left to fear that she cares about anymore; she has done all the worst she ever feared she could do, and even though she condemned Anna to a slow horrible death — even with Anna knowing that fact — Anna never stopped loving Elsa and trying to save her, down to her last frozen breath. Anna's death left, for the first time in forever, no place for any fear in Elsa's heart — just love for Anna and sorrow at having lost everything that mattered. Through Anna's courage and love, Elsa was able to finally experience and understand having a motivation, a love, of her own strong enough to drive out her fear, allowing the thaw to begin.
    • One thing I found rather jarring is why "Some people are worth melting for." didn't work. What Measure Is a Non-Human?, but still...
    • Come to think of it, the fact that he keeps talking about love and how it is putting someone else before you means that the scene is probably intentional. Olaf or Krisoff's acts didn't work because it has to be Anna's act of true love.
    • Guys, you are all missing the point of that entire plot. Her heart freezing is METAPHORICAL as well as literal because she keeps losing and contradicting the kinds of real love she actually has in her life. Up to that point where her heart is frozen, she spends the entire movie thinking it'll be as simple as leaving her one true love back at the palace, finding her sister and, now that she understands her sister was pushing her away to keep her ice powers hidden and not because she didn't like her, the sister she loves so much would listen to her and come back. Then you get to her song reprise with Elsa and Elsa still refuses to come! Picture the end of that scene without ANY magic for a second. Anna is trying to comfort her sister and reassure her and what does Elsa do? She turns and SCREAMS "I can't!" at her. The way she says this, she is MAD. And then right after, she throws Anna out! It is clear by the way Anna reacts this is totally unexpected and she has no idea what to do now, she thought for sure Elsa, her sister who she still loves a lot, would listen to her. And yet even with the frozen heart thing, she survives okay for a pretty long time, getting all the way to the trolls and sitting through an entire musical number without ANY ill effects. It's only When the trolls point out they're marrying her to Kristoff that she has her first really bad reaction, which makes perfect sense. At that point, she didn't love Kristoff, she was still in love with Hans, so marrying Kristoff would have been a betrayal of love she was being tricked into. And it's only When she has that bad reaction that the Troll Chief finally appears to help and tells her about the true love thing, so they want to go back to Hans. And then of course, Hans betrays her too. These repeated acts of breaking her trust in someone she loved are clearly speeding up the process. After Hans leaves the room, she looks to the fire, but no longer has the strength to get up and start it until Olaf shows up and does it for her. You say 'some people are worth melting for' didn't help but it did, it helped her enough to be able to get out of there and run across the ice to save her sister. Repeatedly throughout the movie people who Anna believed loved her are (to use an appropriate metaphor) LEAVING HER OUT IN THE COLD. Her sister who she loves shut her out and when she finally thinks she knows why, goes to Elsa and gets shut out again when she tries to help, and her fiance who she was willing to brave the wrath of her sister for (Note she says at the first meeting with Hans "If you'd done that to my sister..." meaning she knows Elsa has a temper) and came to begging for help reveals he never really loved her. Anna had been preforming acts of true love the entire MOVIE, what she needed was for someone to preform one for HER, to reassure her she really was loved. She needed someone to 'touch her heart' and stop 'leaving her to the cold'. One of Elsa's lines during "Let It Go" was "You'll never see me cry!" When she's singing about how happy she is to be alone and free and away from everyone including her sister. But when her sister is frozen she does exactly that, crying desperately over Anna's frozen body. THIS is the act of true love that saves Anna, not rescuing Elsa, because someone finally showed Anna they loved her as deeply as Anna loved them. That's why there's a delay, because it's Elsa who breaks the curse by finally regretting having never let Anna in and proving her love, not Anna.
    • ^ That. The "True Love" thing is getting blown way out of proportion. To be true love, it has to be reciprocated. Anna demonstrated her love for Elsa by sacrificing herself for her, and Elsa demonstrated her love for Anna by crying over her sacrifice. This was the Act of True Love required to thaw Anna's frozen heart. Their parents' love couldn't thaw Anna's brain because fixing the mind requires a different procedure than fixing the heart. Also, love isn't the key to controlling Elsa's powers, it's the key to thawing them. Elsa demonstrates plenty of control over her powers any time she's onscreen and not under the influence of fear.

     You go girl! Wait, Elsa, what are you gonna eat? 
  • Okay, so Elsa storms off into the wilderness, she feels free, she doesn't have to hide her powers, it's totally awesome, she's never going back, yadayada. But what exactly is she planning to eat out there?
    • I would assume she would create food using her powers. Kind've bland having all your food taste like ice, but it's better than starving.
    • She'd starve anyway, surely? You can't live on water alone, at least not for more than a few weeks. Perhaps the few weeks would give her some time to figure out campfire cooking, but it seems like it'd be a messy business all around.
    • She managed to create sentient life from snow. It shouldn't be too far of a stretch to assume that she can make sustainable ice food.
    • Probably it would look like the food Tecna made while lost on Omega Dimension.
    • MAGIC!
    • Use the creatures she creates to hunt food for her.
    • Or maybe she doesn't need to eat to begin with. She seemingly has no issue with endothermic taxing ("The cold never bothered me anyway"), so maybe she doesn't need energy or nutrients. She is probably like a zombie, only animated by ice magic rather than dark.
    • Squick!
    • But she can eat and enjoy chocolate. So either she doesn't need to eat, but can do it, she would have had snow beast get food for her, or she planned to starve herself to death. Or you know, she's being irrational and panicked just a little to much, which she did, and didn't think things through. Several times in a row, in fact. Her happiness at being "free" was 1). very sudden, 2). seemly in denial (really, she had NO clue she froze the kingdom and thought no one would come for her), and 3). complete Mood Whiplash. It's not hard to say that she's depressed and sudden "high" periods can end up being temporary. She's happy to be free of the mental restraints, but she's deluding herself into thinking that she's found the perfect solution.
    • Maybe she took cooking lessons from Jessie's mom?
    • I'd say she just didn't think about it. She wanted to get as far away as possible from people she could hurt or be hurt by, as quickly as possible. I doubt she stopped to think about food, and then after that she's probably still riding the emotional rollercoaster for long enough that it doesn't occur to her before she's brought back to Arendelle.
    • Exactly. Despite the triumphant themes of Let It Go, Elsa's new life in the mountains is just as unsustainable as her attempts to bottle up her magic. The only way for her to move forward is to make peace with her powers and the people in her life, as she does by the end.
    • Well, she's up there long enough to have gotten hungry if she was going to. The Snow Queen is traditionally a self-sustaining elemental goddess; that may have been Elsa's Final Form.
    • Probably not so much. The length of time that that part of the movie takes place over doesn't seem like it's that long (maybe less than a day). The sort of emotions that would come with horrifying yourself by lashing out dangerously at others, followed by being cast out of your own home, and then becoming briefly euphoric from the realization that you no longer need to be afraid of something that's horrified you for most of your life could probably keep you from noticing that you physically needed food for a while. Like others have said, although "Let It Go" is a song with a generally upbeat tempo, it's not exactly her highest point, objectively. It's not so much an actual sustainable plan as it is a reflection of the character's briefly euphoric mental state at the time.
    • Really, that's probably the point. "Let It Go", while seeming triumphant, is really a big honking lie in song form (you'll notice that Elsa goes on to contradict most of the lyrics—we do see her cry later in the movie, she does come back, and instead of ignoring the 'storm', meaning her powers, she freaks out over them in the reprise of 'For The First Time In Forever'). It's not really the solution to her problem, and the situation it posits is as untenable as the one she was in before, and the fact that she'll starve if she remains in that position is just the tip of the iceberg.
    • Word of God says that Elsa has mental health problems and it's fair to suppose she was having a fairly intense episode in 'Let It Go': either she was too euphoric to be hungry, or felt so invincible that she felt above needing food, or so numb that she was indifferent to the fact that she'd starve up there- in that extreme level of depression the physical sensation of hunger sometimes doesn't automatically trip the distress that should make the person act on it.
    • I highly doubt Elsa was in a state of euphoria from the time of "Let It Go" all the way to the time Anna reached her. My guess is either Elsa just didn't feel hungry (maybe she was still a bit stuffed from the party) or would've figured something out if she was. Elsa's actions were impulsive, yes, but she's pretty smart. It's really not too much of a stretch to think she could've survived in that castle.
    • In the moment, rather than afterward, her plans were unsustainable and a result of a less-than-lucid state of mind. Under different circumstances (ie., if she hadn't frozen over an entire country), she could have figured out a solution to the more basic problems related to her survival, but those solutions would have been ad hoc rather than planned out from the beginning. The more fundamental problem is less that she didn't plan around food very well and more that she thought that running off into the mountains was a long-term idea in the first place. Obviously someone was going to follow her, and obviously they were going to eventually find the giant ice palace, but she couldn't be troubled by that at the moment. While a euphoric spell is usually pretty brief, the enormous amount of stress that she would have been under would have made things like hunger or sleep seem like more distant issues until they became extreme.
      • Anyway, we don't know how she spent the 36 hours or so between building the tower and Anna finding there- she did just run up a huge mountain then cast more magic than even she realised was possible- for all we know that's exhausting and she could have made herself a big snow pillow and slept half that time away.

    Extra fun sociopathy discussion! 
  • Is there any solid reason beyond Draco in Leather Pants that is making some fans so averse to calling Hans a sociopath? He fakes emotion, manipulates people, takes joy in the suffering of others, lies habitually, and feels no guilt about his actions. He attempts to outright murder Anna and Elsa twice and attempts to engineer their deaths another half a dozen times and actually goes out of his way to be cruel to Anna when her heart is freezing by explaining his initial evil plan to her, which reveals that none of his prior behavior has been genuinely altruistic. And yet despite all this, there are people who say that we are jumping the gun in using that word because "Word of God hasn't directly confirmed it" or some such nonsense? Do we also need Word of God to tell us that Elsa likes blue or can we just use the fact that we only ever see her wear blue as evidence that she does in fact like blue?
    • Calling him a sociopath is just as dickish to him and real sociopaths as calling him autistic or gay or any such other things. "asshole", yes, what he did was the definition of being an asshole. But he could have done all that without being a sociopath, and a different character could be a sociopath without doing a single thing you listed.
    • Nope.
    • Being a self-centered asshole is one of the defining traits of sociopathy/psychopathy. What's more, his actions go beyond just self-centered assholery into multiple attempted murders and a power grab. It's not a hard logical leap to make.
    • Because it's really freaking uncomfortable that every single "charming but dangerous" villain gets slapped with the "oh they must be mentally ill" label. There is an explained motive in text in the form of his ambition to be king, combined with the implication that he was neglected and bullied by his older brothers. He's a person with a messed up home life that has come out of that thinking it's okay to be cruel to people younger or more vulnerable than you. That doesn't necessarily mean it isn't possible for them to be a sociopath, but it's a headcanon, and accusing people who don't agree with it of doing it because they find the villain sexy isn't cool.
    • Though Word of God said Hans' brother's treating him badly was true, it doesn't justify his actions. Sociopathy it's a potential alternate explanation (and while it may explain his actions they were still evil). Even if we decide to discard Hans' words about his childhood, I don't think he's lying about wanting to be king, and "ruthlessly power-hungry" does not necessarily mean "sociopath". As I said, you are free to believe your theory, I'm not trying to take that away! But I would suggest that it's not unreasonable to believe in alternate explanations when the text itself provides them, which is what the original post in this thread is arguing.
    • Calling having your family, or even just part of your family, literally pretend that you do not exist, for YEARS only a "slightly bad childhood" is a clear sign that you've never had anyone do that to you, nor have you ever met anyone who's been subject to that behaviour. It is absolutely absolutely absolutely emotional abuse. It is telling somebody that they are worse than nothing, that they would be better off having never existed, and it is incredibly hurtful and psychologically damaging. Personally, I think Hans is an absolutely awful person, but I don't think he's a sociopath. There really isn't any evidence that he doesn't have the ability to feel empathy or anything like that, we just see that he was faking it for one specific person. It's rather pointless to make him a psychopath just because he does terrible things. Humans can be absolutely horrible people while being completely neurotypical, they don't need a mental illness to do it.
    • Yes, the spoiler is terrible and would be psychologically damaging, but the only indication it happened are the words of a known liar who was explicitly trying to manipulate someone at the time. (And Word of God.) Hans' childhood is a complete Ambiguous Situation for that reason, as we never get any reliable information about it other than the fact that he has brothers, going off a comment at the end.
    • With regards to this, it's fully possible that Hans actually was telling the truth that two-or three of his brothers "pretended that he didn't exist". Think about it - if he has like, over ten older brothers, just imagine the age-gap between him and the oldest. His oldest brother could have possibly been over a decade older than him (or more) and when he's a little kid, is well into adulthood so he simply doesn't have time. Especially if he refers to brothers who may be twins.
    • So aside from having all the symptoms, traits, and general behavior patterns, he's not actually a sociopath? There is literally a mountain of character evidence pointing to his being a sociopath. Also HOW IN THE NAME OF CHRIST IS IT INSENSITIVE?! We aren't mocking a handicapped person here, we are identifying a character's mental condition. Hell, Anna pretty much was a victim of emotional abuse (and later physical, though that was entirely unintentional on Hans' part and luckily not successful in hurting Anna due to magic) at the hands of Hans. You could make the case that its more insensitive to casually dismiss the idea that he is a sociopath and trying to assign him a sympathetic Freudian Excuse.
    • You can't "identify a character's mental condition" unless you're a doctor. Specifically, their doctor. I'm pretty sure that you aren't Hans' doctor, so why do you feel the need to play Armchair Psychiatrist about it? Isn't it enough to be able to agree that he is objectively a terrible person who does evil things? It takes more to diagnose someone than a single day of observation.
    • There seems to be a degree of talking past one another throughout this argument. I can see where people prefer to avoid conflating high-functioning clinical sociopathy with general purpose homicidal assholishness, and that is fair even if the difference to those that are in the way of either come close to being academic. On the other hand, there are those whose objection to the sociopath label is fueled by how much it interferes with the woobification of those so labelled... which does earn the ire of many.
    • Bravo good sir/madam for saying what is probably the most sensible thing in this entire argument.
    • In closing, Hans has the traits of a sociopath and he most likely is one, but the labelling will have to wait until the writers and directors of Frozen confirm or deny it.
    • To everyone who believes Hans is a sociopath, you are correct. Jennifer Lee has confirmed he indeed is one.
If that is the case then Jennifer Lee doesn't know what she is writing about
  • It's been confirmed. Jennifer Lee is the director of the film; it's her character and her story (inspired by/initially based on 'The Snow Queen' by Hans Christien Anderson); even if it's an inaccurate to real-life portrayal of a sociopath. She intended Hans to be a sociopath and he displays some of the traits, therefore HANS IS A SOCIOAPATH, case closed. Everyone trying to put the leather pants on Hans, deal with it.

    Anna, your hair is odd. 
  • Is Anna's hair color blonde or red? In the current profile pic here she looks blonde, but in the movie her hair was a really red-blonde?
    • If you're talking about the main page pic, that's not Anna, that's Elsa with her white-blond hair.
    • I'm talking about this.
    • Maybe it's a case of lighting? Maybe her hair is a bright reddish-blonde but in certain light it looks more red... or maybe the creators fought about her hair like certain three fairies about a colour of a certain dress and we see now the remainders of the battle.
    • The linked photo looks strawberry-blond to me, same as in the film itself.
    • Seconded. In the picture her hair looks to me to be on the redder side. Monitor differences?
    • In a novelization Princess Anna describes her hair as strawberry blonde.

    How do magic dresses work? 
  • This has been bugging me: in "Let It Go", when Elsa undergoes her Evil Costume Switch, she forms her new dress using her powers, so it's covering her other dress...but her new one has a slit in the hem, showing her bare legs underneath. What the heck happened to her old dress?
    • I figured she just used her ice powers to rip apart the old dress.
    • But if that was the case, wouldn't we still see the shreds of the old dress on the floor or something?
    • It did notice the bunch of snow that shot off when she changed; perhaps those are frozen bits of the old dress.
    • Eh, I'm willing to write it off as "the animators wanted to do a costume change quickly".
    • Magic.
    • It looks like she turned the old dress into ice to create the new dress.
  • Re-watch the video. You can actually see the old one ripping and hear a ripping sound.
  • A split skirt is the least of it. While not showing cleavage, her new neckline does dip a lot — from a half turtleneck or collar before — and her sleeves are visibly gone through the translucent sleeves of the new dress.

    How do magic dresses work round II! 
  • Related to the headscratcher directly above: how DID Elsa create her new clothes? Wearing ice seems rather uncomfortable to this troper..
    • Well, to quote Elsa's song, "The cold never bothered me anyway". Indeed, ice, snow, and cold temperatures don't seem to have any effect on Elsa at all, which, having ice powers, would only make sense she'd be immune to ice-related stuff. So to answer the question, it's entirely possible that her clothes are completely made of ice and snow, but it simply doesn't bother her.
    • The question we should be asking is why her ice clothes don't melt. Just because the cold doesn't bother her doesn't mean that she doesn't expel body heat.
    • Magic.
    • That or it's sort of the same logic behind Olaf's snow cloud at the end, but without a visible cloud.
    • See above.
    • An application of Required Secondary Powers. Elsa would need to support some kind of magical insulation over her skin to avoid being frostbitten by her own ice. By preventing her body heat from escaping (which is what makes us feel cold), it also prevents the ice around her from being heated. Similar to how you could wear icicles over a coat if you wanted, except the coat is invisible.
    • Elsa could have just been using her powers to keep the ice dress frozen. She's more than strong enough to do something like that.
    • It's actually entirely possible that she doesn't expel body heat. Notice that in scenes where other characters' breath creates visible steam, Elsa's does not.
    • Since Elsa turned summer into winter and the inside of the castle freezes over despite the fact that every fireplace was likely lit, that any ice/snow/etc generated by her magic actually doesn't melt unless Elsa makes it so. The only time this ISN'T the case is the ballroom inside the castle is clearly not frozen anymore, but it's also possible that Elsa's love for her sister and parents began to melt it at some point. Unless Elsa wants her dress to melt, it simply won't. She unfroze Arendelle because that's what she wanted to do, but she didn't want to melt her gown. With love, Elsa can unmelt what she wants of her magic.
    • OP here. What I meant was more along the lines of "How did Elsa create cloth out of ice?" But after reading the responses, I guess her dress could literally be ice, even if that seems a bit implausible.
    • Different interpretation here: if Elsa can create life from snow, surely she can create cloth, skates, etc. from snow even if it's not strictly snow. That is, if she can do things to snow that snow usually can't do (be alive), she can make it into other things (cloth, metal) and still have it be within the realm of her powers.
    • Her power is not merely over snow and ice, but over all things winter.
    • Alternate interpretation: this troper always saw it as her constantly "updating" the snow/ice dress as it melts off, like a passive "ice armor" spell in an RPG that just happens to be much thinner and prettier than the usual pauldrons of doom/chainmail (chainfrost?) bikinis.

    How do magic dresses work round III? 
  • Wouldn't it extremely awkward for someone to hug Elsa when she's wearing that ice dress? Elsa may not mind it, but it must be like hugging a big block of soft ice because that's... well... pretty much what you're doing.
    • When Anna hugs her just after her Disney Death, she's still wearing her winter gear, and it was still freezing cold outside anyway, so she probably didn't notice. After that, Elsa presumably had a line of regular cloth dresses made in the style of the dress she designed herself and obviously liked, and she's wearing one in the final scene (before which enough time passed for a custom-made sled for Kristoff to be commissioned, made, and delivered).
    • I don't think Elsa planned on hugging anyone when she moved to her ice castle..., and if she had, it probably wouldn't have been the first thing on her mind as her dress was made.
    • And when Anna hugs Elsa at the end, she certainly doesn't look like she just hugged a block of ice.
    • I'm thinking we're all taking Elsa's ice ability a little too far. Yes, the dress could very well be made of ice, but the woman can conjure snow too and, as we all may know, Snow can compact itself and stick together. Not to mention the person who continually said Magic above has a very legitimate point. The magic would be able to keep the snow molded to her body, the cloak could be made of a mixture of frost, snow and ice in order for it to have that almost transparent quality to it. As for where her other dress goes... I have a theory. The magic shredded it, turned it to ice and then used it to make parts of the dress, also adding to the fabric-like quality of the material.
    • So it's a mix of snowflakes and silk fibres? Well, it's a clever idea...

    Let It Go! and explain! 
  • There is a theory that Elsa's powers represent homosexuality. What does "Let It Go" represent in this regard?
    • Her coming out of the closet presumably.
    • "Let It Go," is a song about rejecting what society might think about you and exalting yourself for what makes you, you. It really doesn't matter what Elsa's powers represent (sexuality, talents, personality), its meaning really doesn't change.
    • Think of it this way: Elsa is born with certain traits linked to her emotions that, while not inherently bad, are embarrassing to her parents. Her parents tell her to repress these feelings ("conceal, don't feel"), and this repression is linked to being a good member of the family ("be the good girl you've always had to be"). When her secret does come out, some people think she's dangerous and a monster. When she rejects society and decides to celebrate herself, she changes from a high-necked, long-sleeved dress into a low-cut shimmery thing with a slit down the leg. This troper definitely saw it as a metaphor for coming out of the closet.
    • Except for all LGBT people I know, "coming out" meant integrating into society with their secret revealed, not running into the wilderness to live as a hermit. If anything, Elsa is even worse off after being "outed" than she was in the palace, where she at least had books, servants, etc. She chose to isolate herself from society out of the fear of accidentally hurting someone with her powers, which is pretty much the opposite of coming out: she only dug herself deeper. To me, "Let It Go" is more of a Then Let Me Be Evil moment, minus her actually being evil.
    • No metaphor can be perfect, but that's a bit like splitting hairs. The key point is that Elsa is no longer ashamed of her inherent attributes and therefore no longer hides them, just like LGBT individuals should no longer be ashamed of their inherent attributes and therefore no longer hide them. In the real world, societal acceptance is a top priority in case you want a confortable, long life, but many LGBT citizens came out because it is the right thing to do, regardless of the consequence (i.e. Alan Turing). Elsa basically came out, she accepted herself for who she was and no longer cares if anyone has a dissenting opinion. She simply did them a little favour by residing in the mountains so that her powers would not affect anyone directly, but it's not like she's particularly concerned about whereas anyone is still a prick and goes after her (until she is informed that her carelessness doomed everyone that is).
    • I saw a great deal of honest joy in Elsa over actually using/embracing her power, but I agree that in the long term such isolation would not be the best goal. The true triumph was not the mountaintop keep, but the skating rink in the palace courtyard.
    • I thought that "Let it Go" was a moment of Elsa accepting herself, but not accepting her position in society. She only kinda somewhat accepts herself. It's like the moment where, if we're using homosexuality as an example, one realizes that one is gay and begins to celebrate that within yourself, while still being absolutely terrified of what everyone else around you will do when they find out. She has found freedom within herself... but she still needs to reconcile the fact that just because she's okay with herself, doesn't mean that others will be. So she runs off and hides in a tower that serves as a metaphorical prison. She's more free than before, but still trapped within her fear. She accepts herself, but not what accepting herself will mean for her life. It's a big, important step... but she's still got a ways to go, which is why the movie doesn't end there.
    • When you're from a particularly conservative community, you can only truly come out and be yourself after leaving it (and, worst case, breaking off all contact like Elsa meant to do). In a perfect world this wouldn't be necessary, but this ain't a perfect world. Reconnecting with your birth family after you've accepted yourself (and worn that shimmery ice dress at the Pride parade) is a nice bonus.
    • Perhaps this is way off, but I thought of it as very similar to the very blackest pit of depression, exactly as described in Hyperbole and a Half. This is the stage where she's eventually so tired of hurting, she...stops caring. About anything. Which gives her a giddy sort of courage, because it means nobody can do anything to hurt her anymore. This is Elsa saying "fuck it, I'm not playing anymore". The problem is that it is not freedom from depression, it is its heart. It is isolating, and dare I say, cold. However, when people reach this point, they don't even realize there's a problem. It feels good not to be afraid, right? The tone of the song is so upbeat because she thinks things are looking up, when nothing could be further from the truth.
    • In the context of the movie, I figured the scene was about not hiding behind the mask she had created anymore. Had it not been for the accident, she would probably be a lot more like Anna. I think one of the key things people seem to forget, even Elsa, is that her parents' original intent was not to hide her powers but to learn to control them. They just believed that controlling them meant her powers not seeping out when she didn't want them to. She had to become this prim and proper woman that had to be unemotional because they knew her strong emotions caused her powers to start flaring up. Unfortunately, the only strong emotions were from fear through an endless cycle of losing control of her powers scaring her, and being scared making her lose control more. It's the whole "world of cardboard" problem, but she went about learning to live in that world by staying in one place without touching anything instead of practicing with disposable items to understand her relation to everything.

     The 4 mile Ice Sprint 
Ok, so how in the world did Elsa get up the north mountain so fast on foot when it took Anna and Kristoff at least 3/4th of a day to go the same distance on horse/reindeer back as well as walking? How did Elsa get up there with enough time to build her ice castle in 1/2 the time?
  • Elsa didn't need to stop and dress for the cold. She didn't have to worry about normal clothes being frozen solid by either sweating or falling into water. She froze a path across a large lake, then made a staircase across a gaping chasm, so she wasn't weighed down by equipment. Elsa could take the most direct route up the north mountain because she didn't need to take any precautions like Anna and Kristoff.
    • Additionally, she's putting out enough cold magic that wolves would hesitate to attack her, and she's just going straight up the mountain in whatever direction the mood takes her rather than actually trying to follow someone.
    • It's also possible that the elements aided her; the wind at her back for support, maybe even the snow acting like a moving walkway.
    • Anna doesn't seem like the sort to be particularly good at tracking or hunting in any way. For all we know, she could have been going in completely the wrong direction for the first day and night of her pursuit. Then she had to backtrack to get over to the mountain.
    • Given that she didn't know where the North Mountain was (despite being a significant percentage of Arendelle's skyline), it seems safe to assume that Anna was as useless at land navigation as a Second Lieutenant with a map and compass.

     Hans' gloves 
  • It just bugs me that they drew a lot of attention to Hans' gloves, almost daring the viewer to make a connection to Elsa's gloves, yet they never came into play. I expected him all along to also secretly have elemental powers, perhaps for a final battle against Elsa.
    • It helps if you think about it as a metaphor; both are characters hiding deep secrets from Anna (Elsa and her ice powers, Hans and his plan to take over Arendelle) but while one of them is hiding theirs to protect her, the other is hiding it in order to harm her. Besides, people are already complaining that his evil plot came out of nowhere; chances are people would be ESPECIALLY pissed if he also had fire powers out of nowhere as well.
    • In tandem with the above: think about it - "the gloves coming off" is a way of describing a person's true intentions being revealed. When did Hans take off his gloves? When he was detailing his plan to Anna!
    • Wait a second...watch that scene again. Hans put out a candle with his bare hand - explicitly after he removed the glove. I'm willing to bet they originally meant for him to have fire powers, and eventually decided it would be too out of nowhere. They changed the part later - he puts out the fireplace with a jug of water - so it won't be obvious, but did they neglect to change that small bit and hope viewers wouldn't notice?
    • Nah, that's just the normal way people who know what they're doing put out candles. Noobs blow on them, which leaves the wick smoldering and producing smoke. Licking your fingers (which Hans does) and snuffing out the flame by gripping the wick, preferably without dipping your fingers into the hot wax, puts out those embers and leaves the candle smokeless (which the filmmakers got wrong).
    • Why ruin (probably high-quality/expensive) gloves putting out a candle? Take off the glove, then wet your fingers.
    • I always thought that Hans' gloves were a quirk similar to Elsa's in that they're to avoid skin-on-skin contact with other people, but whereas Elsa is afraid of hurting people, Hans is rather... ''different'' about how he sees other people and maybe just has an Adrian Monk-type sensitivity to touching them- other people are warm and usually greasy and sweaty, like, ew. The only time he actually touches another person with no fabric in the way is when he does his No, You to Anna, who at that point probably doesn't feel much like a human being and anyway, it's worth it for the effect it has. YMMV, though.

    Anna chasing Elsa 
  • How in the hell did Elsa get all the way up the mountain in that short a time? Anna was chasing her on horseback, then also had Kristoff take her on a reindeer-driven sled, and still took much longer to get there. Elsa was able to basically settle in while Anna was still in the process of buying a new outfit.
    • Simple enough. The ice, wind, and snow responded to Elsa's conscious and unconscious desires, aiding her in her ascent. The storm hadn't really gotten going in earnest until she'd reached her destination, and it's not impossible to think that the wind was at her back, pushing her along faster, and that the snow that hampered Anna and Kristoff wasn't anywhere near as deep yet. Plus, in "Let it Go", Elsa mentioned that the snow was hiding her footsteps. Anna had no idea where her sister had gotten off to until she met Kristoff, and didn't know specific locations until they met Olaf.
    • Anna went off in the wrong direction, where Elsa went right off the the North Mountain. Also, the snow was much, much thicker when Anna went up than Elsa, who while she is shown to leave footprints just before her musical number, was clearly not up to her mid-thighs in snow.
    • The entire mountain seemed to be working to keep people away from Elsa, given that huge wall of rocks springs up literally overnight on the flat stretch of mountain that Elsa had walked across before building the staircase leading to her castle.

    Source for Japanese dub castings 
  • Seriously, can anyone tell me where it is stated in the Japanese dub, Maaya Sakamoto is Elsa, Yui Ishikawa is Anna, and Takehito Koyasu is Hans?
    • There seems to be an ongoing edit war on the Japanese Wikipedia with those names being added and removed, but I haven't found any trace of an official source. The official Japanese Disney site only gives the English-language cast.
    • And it appears we can now throw those out entirely. The first official cast member has been announced: Takako Matsu is Elsa.

     Primogeniture is worth more than the kingdom? 
  • So, why exactly was the tradition/law of primogeniture more important than ensuring that the probably cursed daughter with magic powers that become hazardous to those around her when in distress didn't end up causing an icy apocalypse from the stress of ruling? Couldn't the king have declared that, for the safety of the kingdom, he would temporarily suspend primogeniture and name his younger child heir for the safety of both his children and the kingdom (and/or privately convince parliament or local equivalent to do so if that's how the local legal system works?
    • Somehow bending the rules to let Elsa keep wearing gloves seems a lot less complicated. Also, how does the guy who crowned her NOT notice the stuff is partially iced over?
    • Given the time period the movie most likely takes place in, and the various delegates at Elsa's coronation (French, German-most likely Prussian or Austrian, Spanish etc), suddenly changing the succession without a good reason for why Elsa was unfit to rule would have invited interference from the European Great Powers.
    • This brings up another issue...
    • The thing is these things are laws. They're hard to change. When Emperor Charles VI tried to change the succession laws to allow Maria Theresa to ascend to the rule of the Hapsburg hereditary lands, he not only had to spend significant pieces of his reign convincing the other powers of Europe to allow for this 'Pragmatic Sanction' (which was basically what you were saying, 'We're changing the laws of succession to deal with this situation'), but upon his death, a great number decided to ignore it, resulting in the War of the Austrian Succession. It wouldn't be easy to change the laws of succession, and doing so would likely result in bad things for Arendelle. Better to try and resolve Elsa's problems than risk a war as the great powers take advantage of your announcement to get their preferred heir in place, or even generate their own claim.
    • The whole Austrian Succession mess is not the best comparison, as Elsa was already considered an acceptable heir. However, shunting aside an heir apparent that has not actively made herself unpopular is a delicate matter at best.
    • Great idea, let's make the parents look bigoted in the eyes of the modern audience!
    • They already looked like that for their 'bottle it up' instructions. Making her not crown heir would drastically reduce stress and pressures on her — requiring far less bottling it up and far less isolation, enabling her to be herself more. Remember, being the one in charge is a burden, not a privilege, heavy is the head that wears the crown and all that.
    • "Remember, being the one in charge is a burden, not a privilege, heavy is the head that wears the crown and all that." That's a modern adult perspective, though. Medieval heirs wouldn't have fought for thrones so much if they had shared that view. Besides, in fairy tales, inheriting the throne is usually an unambiguously good thing, part of a traditional Happily Ever After ending, and kids are likely to think that it's awesome — and feel sorry for Elsa if she was denied the throne through no fault of her own.
    • There is a non-trivial possibility that the late king did not realize how fragile Elsa's control was by the time she was in her late teens, a larger possibility that he did not want to admit even to himself how badly he and his wife miscalculated in their efforts to get said daughter's powers reined in, and a near certainty in both cases that they had no idea how powerful Elsa actually was. In any case, Elsa's powers being a secret outside of the royal family meant that there also would have to be a reason found to cut her out of the succession (and given how much they cared for the girl, one that would not slander her).
    • To be fair to the king and queen, even the most grounded people often suffer after a sudden loss, such as the death of both of your parents. If they had been there to raise Elsa up into adulthood, maybe things would have been better. Then again, maybe not.
    • This one's easy; the King and Queen were not expecting to die young. In the prologue of the movie, both the King and Queen are still fairly young people who no doubt anticipated being alive for a good long while yet — and consequently, they anticipated having plenty of time being around to help Elsa come to terms with her powers so that she would be able to control them sufficiently come her elevation to the throne. No one was anticipating that they'd be lost in a freak storm at sea; for all they knew, Elsa wouldn't come to the throne for another twenty or thirty years. Not very forward-thinking of them, perhaps, but how many people throughout human history and their plans have been blindsided by sudden death?
    • Another point: Even if the succession laws were all worked out and Anna ascended the throne, it would have finally confirmed to her that there was something physically and/or emotionally unstable in Elsa which made her unfit to rule, which would in turn have further prompted her into pushing Elsa to tell her the secret.
    • Also, what about Anna? Promoting her to heiress apparent (it appears that Arendelle's succession is gender neutral, hence why the King and Queen didn't appear to try and conceive a son) would not only put a strain on Anna, but would also, as stated above, possibly elevate her curiosity about Elsa. The King and Queen are shown to clearly care about Anna, and wouldn't want the risk of two emotionally unstable daughters (even if Elsa were "relieved" or her duties, she still is in need of a lot of support and care).
    • There is no reason why Elsa could not have abdicated in favor of Anna. Especially if Elsa was unsuited to the throne. There was a case where a Crown Prince of England abdicated in favor of his younger brother.
    • But Elsa is more grounded and savvy than Anna. It's clear who would be the better ruler. Anna is able to get serious and order people around, but it's more difficult for her. It also seems to cause disdain in people (like when she made Kristoff take her to the North mountain that night) whereas Elsa is a more natural leader who people follow by choose.
    • Although allowing Elsa to become the queen definitely presents some problems at the beginning of the movie, primogeniture was probably the best option available. Elsa is, for the most part, able to control her powers. Even if her strategies for doing that aren't exactly healthy, they seem to work for at least the time being. At any rate, her parents wouldn't have had any reason to suspect that the outburst that sets off the movie would happen. Anna, on the other hand, is enormously emotionally immature and lacks sound judgment. Would you really want to give whatever power the crown in Arendelle has to someone who marries someone they just met?

     Everybody's okay with a witch-ruled kingdom 
  • The dialog makes clear this is some variant of Europe, the chapel makes it clear something like Christianity is a thing, and the dialog also makes it clear from uses of the word witchcraft with revulsion and horror that the popular and possibly religious concept of witch=bad in and of itself likely exists in-universe. Won't there be massive problems (possibly up to and including a crusade) relating to the fact that a country within Christendom is now openly ruled by a witch?
    • Realistically, it would — especially in an era where trigger-happy rulers were looking for any slightest pretext to invade their neighbors. To the fanfic-mobile!
    • By the 19th Century, which is when the movie most likely takes place, religion did not really play into pretexts for war, witchcraft even less. Also, given the delicate balance of power being maintained in Europe by the Great Powers, no one would be quick to invade Arendelle just because of Elsa's powers, revolutionary fervor on the other hand...
    • Even if you presume a 17th century setting (there are enough muskets about to rule out any earlier time periods), the scope of Elsa's power would force a degree of realpolitik into the discussion. The wiser rulers would stand over the shoulder of their lands' ranking prelates as a letter is written to the Arch(?)bishop of Arendelle concerning the 'wild tales', a reply to the effect of "do not worry over Her Highness' Completely Non-Satanic Gifts From The Good Lord" will be duly accepted, and no more would be said. The less wise sorts... well, any force they send would have to deal with the scope of Elsa's power.
    • Most likely, everyone just turns a blind cheek so that what happened in the movie doesn't repeat itself, especially now that she has control over her powers. Besides, she seemingly works in the entertainment industry, such as converting the palace grounds in an ice skating field. She knows how to keep the masses distracted.
    • There doesn't seem to be so much prejudice against magic in Arendelle. Elsa's parents don't seem to consider her powers to be evil, simply dangerous. People on Elsa's coronation may have been more frightened of how her powers manifested than the fact that she has magic at all - she created sharp spikes, changed water in a fountain into a claw, and then froze the entire country before disappearing. When she undoes the damage, none of her subjects looks bothered that their Queen is a witch and that she is using her magic to make ice rinks for children. Remember also that Elsa was charged by Hans with treason, not witchcraft. Considering that this guy would use any tools avaiable to get the throne, it's unlickly he would pass off such a good and easy opportunity to get rid of her.
    • Compounding this is that only the Duke turns vicious and calling for her death after she accidentally throws ice everywhere, everybody else is just shocked and suprised (compounding the LGBT themes, as even the most homosexual-friendly person is going to be a little suprised when one reveals he or she is gay out of apparently nowhere). Presumably magic-users are an accepted minority like any other, most people don't really care except for a few idiots.
    • Elsa's powers aren't anything like the sort of witchcraft the Church condemned. Witches were specifically people who were getting powers drawn from The Legions of Hell, and using them to harm and curse their neighbors. The Church never tried to apply the same brush to, for example, the supernatural powers saints and kings were frequently believed to possess. I suspect the Church in this world classifies magic of the sort Elsa possesses as a natural gift of God, one that can be abused or rightly used just like any other.
      • In that way it probably helps that she's the Queen. It's okay that it confirms the assumption that royalty are born inherently different from ordinary people, and perhaps are somehow invisibly superhuman. Neighbouring monarchs shouldn't demonize Elsa, they should be finding or creating legends that suggest they have something like that in their own family history that might just show itself one day.
    • Yall, she's like General Winter. If anyone invades, she can just freeze everything. Arendelle is safe for quite some time with her around.
  • First of all, something-like-Christianity by definition may not have the explicit Christian directive, thou shalt not suffer a witch to live. Second, Grandpabble's first question to the King makes it clear that sometimes ordinary people are cursed with uncontrollable magical phenomena - nobody would want to harm a witch's victim in their rush to punish witches. Third, these folks live on Fairy Tale Earth, where supernatural occurrences are obviously uncommon but not unheard of: for all we know, the neighboring kingdoms could be ruled by a talking cat or a Great and Powerful Disembodied Head.

     Architecture and Engineering 
  • So, how did Elsa have the architectural skill to make a structurally sound castle on her first try, without any pretty-but-prone-to-collapse flourishes, particularly given she seems to have built it on a whim?
    • The book A Sister More Like Me establishes that Elsa had an interest in geometry since childhood, with the mention of fractals in her song confirming this (despite fractals not being invented until 1975). And then there's this quote from BioShock Infinite:
      Booker: Where did you learn to pick locks?
      Elizabeth: Trapped in a tower with nothing but books and spare time... You would be surprised what I know how to do.
    • The answer lies in Olaf and the ice stairway that Elsa builds shortly before constructing the castle. If you look at Olaf, you'll notice that his legs aren't actually connected to his body; they just shuffle along the ground while the body levitates above them, kinda like Rayman. The bridge is a similar case. It looks solid enough once built, but Elsa builds it by simply extending it from one edge of the chasm to the other *while walking on it*. Realistically, it should have just snapped off and fallen into the chasm. Clearly, Elsa's magical ice can defy gravity. I would imagine building a fanciful ice palace is a lot easier when all you need to do is give it form and you don't have to worry about the pesky laws of physics collapsing it on top of you.
    • But then again, the chandelier did fall from the ceiling.
    • With Olaf, Elsa's powers prove that they can create self-regulating items (notice Olaf's instant repairs when skewered/disassembled). Her castle is likely held together entirely by her magic, especially since it starts to fall apart when she gets upset with Anna's revelation that she sent the kingdom into a deep freeze.

     Elsa's Room in "Do You Wanna Build A Snowman?" 
  • If Elsa didn't know how to thaw her ice, how did her room turn back to normal after the grieving scene in "Do You Wanna Build A Snowman?" I guess she could have just moved to another room, but if her powers went out of control and she had to move again...that's a lot of rooms in the palace that are getting frozen over.
  • Elsa doesn't know how to thaw her ice magically, but it melts well enough naturally with normal heat, seeing as Olaf began melting several times. She likely left her room for a while with strict orders that no one (not even servants or maids) should enter without permission and waited for the ice to melt.
    • But by that logic, wouldn't there have been no reason to worry about the winter she caused, because it would have melted by itself, Arendelle being in the middle of summer, and all?
    • At that point, her powers had gone out of control so badly that even being in the far mountains above the treeline qualified as being in the 'same room'.
    • I daresay a relatively thin coating of ice in a single room will melt and dry quicker than an entire town that's being subjected to a mighty blizzard.
    • Elsa's powers don't seem to melt unless she wants them too, unless the thing in question is living (presumably her magic with living ice is a might bit unstable). Natural heat doesn't seem to melt them, since her ice dress stays after she returns summer to her kingdom nor when she's embraced, and an entire castle with all the fires lit still freezes internally, even in the rooms with the lit fires. It's possible the love she felt for her parents subconsciously defrosted everything in her sleep. After all, you can't control your emotions whilst you sleep. This same kind of thing is likely what unfroze the ballroom after the initial accident.
    • If that's the case, how do they deal with the constant water damage? All that cold water can't possibly do any favors for the woodwork, the carpet or floorboards.
    • It depends- it doesn't look like she often makes a huge amount of ice in there. It would probably be little enough to pass off as a damp problem or a lot of condensation.
    • Most likely, the ice she created on the walls melted away and/or vanished when she calmed down, since the flare ups in her room were caused by high emotions. When she said she couldn't reverse the blizzard, she was emotionally unstable and faced with a task much more challenging than thawing a bedroom.
    • Elsa's ice seems to have ontological inertia. If she's not actively maintaining it, it has to sustain itself. Olaf demonstrates this when he starts to melt. Her room probably just thawed naturally. As for how this relates to the winter storm, we honestly don't know anything about the effects of the storm. We don't know how far it extended outside of Arendelle, or how cold she dropped the temperature. There is no way to be certain how long it would stay if left to its own devices. We can't even be sure it would end if she died; that might just cause it to stick around until it clears up naturally. Ultimately, it doesn't matter: a surprise blizzard in the middle of summer can be devastating to a medieval country's economy, destroying crops, killing livestock, and also killing citizens who aren't prepared for it. Every day that the winter storm is still in Arendelle makes the kingdom less sustainable.
    • The kingdom probably wouldn't have thawed out if they just waited because it's clear from the scenes shown in the town that the temperature is remaining very low. Presumably after Elsa's outbursts at home she'd get back enough equilibrium for her powers to stop affecting the ambient temperature, so it would melt in summer and in winter she could light the fire to get rid of it. (I know princesses don't usually light their own fires but she wouldn't want anyone else to see the room.)

     Anna's Memories 
  • Did Anna ever get her memories back of her and Elsa playing as children?
    • Well, yes and no. She did not really lose her memories so much as have them altered. The girls' location and clothes changed and possibly memories of a couple minutes prepping for wintry fun (assuming she would've remembered that at all), but other than that, she would have remembered those moments much the same way Elsa would. She just didn't know that Elsa was the source of the snow. While Anna now knows that many of her memories of having fun in the snow occurred indoors rather than outdoors, she still does not remember them that way.
    • Besides, Anna's no older than five when this happens. Having missing, patchy or nonsensical memories things that happen when you're very young is perfectly normal.

     The Kiss Dilemma 
  • Choosing to have the final climax be resolved between the two sisters was a masterstroke; however, that does leave a big gaping question...if the situation was different and the chance was there, given how many classic fairy tale tropes this film chose to turn on their heads; would a kiss from Kristoff have actually succeeded at fixing the curse at all? There were no real clues to support it working, nor any real points to it not being a viable solution either. Not to take away from a great finale of course, but it does leave some ample room to wonder the possibilities...
    • This troper thinks no. The trolls say that only an act of true love can undo the curse. A kiss from someone you love is nice, but is it really an act of true love in the way that sacrificing yourself for someone is? It seems like that the act of true love has to be someone doing something that expresses how much they love someone else, instead of just a kiss. Interestingly, by that logic, it could be argued that Kristoff taking Anna to Hans, wanting to her to be happy with him even though he loved her himself, could have been interpreted as an act of true love itself. In that case, maybe it's the cursed person themselves who has to express/feel the true love. This fits in with the canonical cure, Anna's sacrifice.
    • There is a speech about true love and about how it means thinking of others above yourself, or something or other. A selfless act for a loved one is good. But what made Anna's an act of true love was that she had a choice between running to Elsa or Kristoff. In her mind, the kiss would have saved her, or so she believed. So she was essentially choosing to save Elsa instead of saving herself. That proved she loved her sister enough to sacrifice her own life for her. And it seems that maybe Elsa in turn didn't realise how much Anna really did love her. She must have thought after years of them being estranged, Anna didn't love her that much anymore. And in that moment, Elsa realised that she was loved as well. Fear made Elsa lose control of her powers, but love helped her regain control.
    • Yes, the kiss with Kristoff would have worked. Otherwise, from a story position, Anna's sacrifice wasn't a sacrifice at all, as she wouldn't have been giving up a chance at life.
    • From this troper's point of view, it would, and, simultaneously, it wouldn't. It would have to work — or Anna must believe it would have worked — for it to fit the sacrifice properly, as you say. At the same time, though, if Anna had given up the chance to save Elsa in favor of potentially saving her own life (by running to Kristoff for the kiss), that would probably have invalidated it and the kiss no longer would have worked. It's contradictory, but makes sense if you think through it slowly. This interpretation holds that the matter hinges on Anna's own belief in the effect (which doesn't seem out of the question when magic is interacting so strongly with feelings and metaphorical hearts). Either way, though, Anna probably didn't reason through this, just went "sister in danger, save" - which is, of course, why the sacrifice saved her.
  • So what are we to take from this? That romantic love, the way that it is presented and conventionally applied, cannot be used as a conditional effect for arguments of true love? What Olaf said was certainly true: Kristoff did indeed commit to several actions in the third act of the movie that did not benefit himself — and even hurt him — only to show that love. Therefore, does romantic love simply not work in terms of healing the frozen heart? I don't like the idea of that statement, because it invalidates Kristoff's struggles and basically makes him superfluous in the climax.
    • The way I understood it is that the act of love had to be done by Anna herself, otherwise, there were several times the curse could have been broken by Kristoff, and even by Olaf (allowing himself to melt just so Anna wouldn't be alone).
    • One thing to think about Kristoff and Olaf is that saving a person's life is the duty of a decent person, especially when it's the life of a friend or your ruler. I don't have to truly love you (or like you or even know you, really) to put myself through considerable inconvenience or hardship to save your life. However, I would have to truly love you to face certain death to save you (I'm not that good of a person).
    • Kristoff plays an integral role in the climax as he provides Anna with a way out, even if only in her mind. Without such an escape, Anna cannot perform the act of love (a Heroic Sacrifice for Elsa) she needed to thaw her heart. Like stated above, Anna is the one would needs to perform the act in order to warm her own heart.
  • This troper believes no for a different reason-whilst definitely there, Kristoff and Anna's love had not been developed enough for it to be considered true love. Kristoff's heart is obviously in it, there's no doubt about that. But we mustn't forget-he's only known her about a day, and though he's had a good glimpse of her personality and past, there is still plenty he doesn't know (come to think of it, there's plenty the viewers don't know-what's her last name?). He is also likely unprepared for any sort of long term relationship-remember that he was an Ineffectual Loner with No Social Skills a few hours ago. On Anna's end, she never even noticed anything particularly special about him or his actions until Olaf points it out-though Anna thought herself in a relationship with Hans at the time, she never even considered him as anything more than ordinary until it was, as I said, pointed out by Olaf. At the end, they haven't even given their relationship an official label, though this may be because they find the whole boyfriend/girlfriend thing to be awkward. One could argue that it's a Disney movie, but times have changed since Snow White, and, well, Hans. Enough said.
  • This troper feels that as long as the love felt by the person committing the act is true, reciprocation is not required. Is Marcus' sacrifice for Ivanova in Babylon 5 not true love, even though his love was mostly unrequited? Anna's motivations were pure, she intended to sacrifice herself for Elsa and did everything she could to do so. Even though she didn't die, compare with Harry Potter's self-sacrifice. Survival does not invalidate the act, you just got a bonus 1up.
  • I feel like both Kristoff AND Anna believed their kiss would have worked (why else would Kristoff do his Big Damn Heroes ride?). And since they both believe it, it would have worked, at least at that point in time. And then Anna sees Elsa about to be murdered. Sister in danger. And she loves her sister more than her own life. Of course if she had run for Kristoff, would he have been able to love somebody who abandoned her sister like that? Like the Trolls say, love is a force that is powerful and strange.

     What happened to the henchmen? 
  • They were both unable to move, on the brink of death...and Elsa's ice seems pretty hard to break...and the climate makes it unlikely that the ice-blades would melt naturally...and I doubt that Elsa would have melted the mountain range in the finale, it being a natural ecosystem in itself...yeah, I'm finding it hard to think they lived.
    • You see them getting on the ship home with the Duke of Weselton at the end of the film.
    • It's not a stretch to imagine that Hans (not to mention the rest of the search party) helped them down after Elsa was knocked unconscious by the chandelier.
    • Use the butt of the crossbow to break the icicles holding Henchman A to the wall, and toss Henchman B a rope and/or slide the ice wall out of the way. Easy as pie.

     What happened to the ice harvesters? 
  • Okay, so in the beginning, we have the ice harvesters harvesting ice. Kristoff is their apprentice or something (considering that they're not watching him terribly much, the way parents would, and he's clearly "adopted" by the trolls, which implies orphanhood). Cut to thirteen years later, and it seems that he's the only ice harvester around. Where did they go?
    • Well, if you take the real world connection into account, maybe all the ice harvesters we happened to see in the opening sequence were all members of the Sami. If history tells us anything, being a member of an indigenous peoples has never been exactly easy. Perhaps they're still around, just, not anywhere near the castle town; opting to stay wherever it is they've made their settlements. It's a bit of a stretch, but it's plausible.
    • This troper took that as a sign that with the King and Queen dead, Arendelle was going through an economic depression.
    • Ice harvesters disperse in the summer to the different areas that they are supplying, Kristoff supplied the area around Arendelle, while other harvesters supplied other areas. Remember, the goal is to make money, and you can't do that by selling to a very limited market, demand quickly declines.
    • More likely, the ice harvesters only work in the winter, gathering and stockpiling ice to create a supply to last through the summer. Kristoff, being the anti-social guy in a questionable relationship with an animal that needs a cold climate, likely stays up in the mountains, only coming to town to sell his ice to anyone who doesn't have their own supply. During the summer, the other harvesters probably either have farms or other businesses that won't suffer too badly if they head into the mountains for a few months every winter.
    • The other harvesters were all minor characters anyway. Why would they still be in the movie?
    • Kristoff is also the guy who's seriously into ice. The other ice harvesters probably find something else to do during the summer months when there's no ice for them to harvest, but Kristoff likes to hang around close to the ice because, well, he really likes ice.

     How does Elsa's hair work? 
  • Elsa's pre-Let It Go hair is a bun with a forehead braid. Then she takes it down and it turns into a French braid. How?

     Elsa's hair Part II 
  • This is probably just an oversight by the animators, but where did Elsa's bangs go when she let down her hair? They just kind of disappear or magically elongate so she can sweep them back.
    • The coronation bun is very complicated, but essentially, the lower half of the braid runs along the left and front sides of her head, and her 6 inch long bangs wrap around it to hold it up, and it holds the bangs up. When Elsa grabbed the back of the bun and pulled, it slipped the end of the braid out and the bangs fell to their full length. She then pushed her bangs up on top of her head, giving her hair a feathered look and hiding the lack of balance between the sides of her hair. The real question is how did she style that in less than 16 hours?
    • I get that explanations for her longer bangs, but I'm talking about the bangs across her forehead like in this picture: [1] It looks like those are just her normal bangs, not braided/styled into anything. When Elsa lets down her hair, they literally disappear. Probably just an oversight by the animators.
    • They have been wrapped around the braid and are 6ish inches long. The angle to the right is because they have been pinned there by the braid.
    • Maybe she didn't like bangs, so she cut them off with a thin, sharp piece of ice while letting her hair down.
  • My guess about the short bangs as mentioned is that it got swept up with her longer bangs and kind of just stuck with them. Ice probably makes a hell of a hair gel if you know what you're doing.
  • From looking at a gif of the scene frame by frame, Elsa's short bangs seem to be there as she throws away the crown but have vanished as soon as she reaches back to pull down the braid. Looks like Rapunzel isn't the only one with magic hair.
  • Oddly, I watched the movie for three hours, only the scenes with Elsa so I could detect her hair. It looks like the braid in the front is actually connected to the bun in the back. The bun in the back is the French braid rolled around itself and tied down that way to keep it in place. The braid in the front is just the longer bangs that Elsa pushes back and disrupting the braid in the back actually loosens the braid in the front, causing it to flop down, giving a reason for her to push it back. This makes sense considering Anna's hair is in her two iconic pigtails during the coronation, but they are also artfully braided around her head to appear more formal for her sister's coronation.

     How did Olaf get into the castle? 
  • How did Olaf get past the gigantic castle wall, avoid detection, AND somehow conveniently find the room that Anna was locked in?
    • The guards are either extremely inept or the guy's a lot sneakier than he looks.
    • He is small and made out of snow. If he keeps his mouth shut remaining unnoticed in a snowstorm is not that hard.
    • That is a very big "If."
    • On that note, maybe he scared the guards away (the same he did that random woman when sledding into Arandelle) by walking up to them and going "Hello!" Eternal blizzard... princess just returned, clearly sick and dying... and now talking snowmen? Screw This, I'm Outta Here!! For the last question, a WMG on the page posits that Olaf can always tell where Anna and Elsa are, because he is magic and, more specifically, magic built from the bond of love between them. It's an unconscious power.
    • At this point, the snowstorm is getting much worse, everything is freezing over to the point where the storm is freezing the inside of the castle, the snow looks like it's starting to pile up over walls and buildings, and even royal guards have their limits. Olaf probably manages to get around unseen because almost everyone is either huddled together trying not to freeze to death or is preoccupied trying to find Elsa.
    • There's several feet of snow in the middle of summer and your new queen has just been revealed as a corporeal ice-goddess. A talking snowman probably wouldn't be thought of as unusual by that point. The guards probably took one look at him, took a hit from a flask of brandy, and threw another log on the fire.
    • Who says he got inside without being seen? Maybe he just explained the situation to one of the guards and they told him what room Anna was in - at that point, everyone knew about Elsa's ice powers, and there may have been someone working there who knew about her magic beforehand, maybe even about how the princesses had built Olaf before as kids.
  • Also, consider how Elsa gets out (apart from the fact that she causes part of the building to collapse, it seems). From her window she looks straight out onto the thickly-frozen fjord- normally that window would look only onto deep water, that surrounds the castle on all sides, so it's now possible to walk right up to the castle walls where normally it would be only possible to access by boat or swimming. It's also not terribly secure, as cells go- and presumably that's just the dungeon. Chances are that there are a lot of such weak spots- an entrance for supplies, say- which don't have much reinforcement because they're never normally accessible on foot.
  • There could be some damage elsewhere in the building and Olaf probably has no problem climbing up snowdrifts to get to, say, a window that's burst open in the wind.

     Why keep both of them in the castle? 
  • Why is Anna stuck in the castle since childhood along with Elsa? It's pretty obvious she was bored and wanted company, so why not let her leave and meet other people?
    • Anna would probably start asking her parents why Elsa couldn't go out with her, leading to her parents having to come up with a reason to keep Elsa in, and it would seem more and more suspicious if Anna was always allowed to go out while Elsa wasn't.
    • She's a princess, she's not supposed to go out and meet those filthy commoners. She might have been offered servants or nobles for company, but knowing Anna, it's unlikely that any company without being able to leave the palace or see Elsa would be enough for her.
    • Perhaps to cut down on the rumors? Anna wouldn't mean to gossip, but it's easy for me to imagine her saying things like "yeah, my sister never leaves her room, even inside the castle" or "I sometimes see the cleaning crews throwing out furniture with water damage, what's up with that?" Or maybe Anna wouldn't spill, but someone else would tell her a story about someone cursed with uncontrollable ice powers, and it would be eerily familiar, enough for her to connect some dots. Elsa and their parents were paranoid, they wouldn't want even a chance that people would start to figure out her secret. And/or the above explanation also makes sense - whether or not the royal family has prejudice against commoners, it'd still be weird for Anna to just... walk up to them. Imagine six- or twelve- or sixteen-year-old Anna leaving the castle with a royal escort (if the manpower could even be spared; they were running on a skeleton crew and, again, didn't want people going in and out to spread rumors) and trying to wander around and make friends with random subjects. Actually, it's even possible that she *did* try that, and found it so awkward and unsatisfying that she pinned her hopes on the coronation introducing her to her peers (like Hans) and forcing Elsa out of hiding.
    • In response to the rumors thing, it does cut down on suspicion towards Elsa specifically. If the younger princess Anna frequently leaves the palace and the older one stays locked away, people are bound to wonder, "What the hell's wrong with Princess Elsa? I mean, why the hell do we never see her in public? I mean, she's supposed to be our next queen, right?". And it is bad for Elsa since she is next in line for the throne - people might question whether she is fit to rule. But if the entire royal family stays in the palace then you maintain the illusion that everyone just wants to keep their business to themselves. Alternately the girls never left the palace before anyway but Anna and Elsa didn't mind because they had each other for company. It would be improper for two young royal children to go outside the palace without some kind of escort - and that hardly allows them to have the kind of fun they wanted.
    • Well who would have been able to go outside with Anna since they were running with a skeleton crew?
    • Seemed clear to this troper that she was basically kept imprisoned in the castle, forbidden from going out. In the song "For the First Time In Forever," she expresses (perhaps hyperbolic, but still) surprise that the doors and windows even open anymore. As lonely as she sounds from that song, if she could have gone out and met someone, it seems likely she would have.
    • A Sister Like Me, in addition to Elsa's love of geometry, has Anna going outside. She rides a pony, climbs trees, looks in Elsa's window, is out in all weather. Even just by the movie, she knows how to ride, which would be hard to learn if you spent your whole life after 5 inside. I think we can go with "Elsa did not spend 13 years in one room, and Anna did not spend 13 years indoors, but their childhoods were lonely and Elsa avoided playing with Anna or talking to her much." As for the song, that could refer to the hall windows and grand doors for crowds, vs. small doors for individuals. The palace had been dark and empty and mostly shut up, not sealed. Now there was light and crowds!

     Elsa's powers 
So like, Elsa's got control over cold and ice, yeah? How does her power generate light? How does this enable her to create life? And how does this allow her to alter her dress?
  • Rule of Cool. Plain and simple.
  • She's never shown generating light; ice and snow always glow slightly in moonlight, and animation has to bring that effect to life somehow (or, it could just be a passive Power Glows effect). The dress is made out of very thin layers of ice. Her powers over ice and snow allow her to literally transfigure snow into sentient, living creatures (she could not bring anything made of other materials to life).
  • Though this does not explain how Olaf's stick arms and eyeballs came to be
  • Her powers also clearly give her control over the winds and weather in addition to ice and snow; when she formed Olaf, you can see the stick arms and other pieces fly in from offscreen, carried by the wind.
  • So, basically, she stole someone's eyes...
  • I think the "light" the OP was talking about was when Elsa makes the big snowflake pattern on the top floor of her castle sort of light up ("my power flurries through the air into the ground"). As to the life, it's possible that part of her magic is unstable, since Olaf is the only thing Elsa creates that is shown to melt due to natural heat. Putting life into something is something Elsa can only do when she's feeling extremely powerful emotions (joy at being able to be herself for Olaf and Marshmallow was born out of her desire to protect Anna from Elsa herself)
  • Barring the dress and the living snowmen her powers are easily described as emotion fueled Burst Type PSI. Everything else is "Magic". The main problem I have is: Where is she getting all the water from? Even if she pulls the hydrogen and oxygen out of the air she would have problems after large bursts, such as the castle, where there would be very little available H2O in the environment. She is not getting a lot of it out of the snow as that would result in structural issues as that would result in collapsing snowdrifts, avalanches and the like.
  • As far as the light goes, considering that Word of God confirmed Elsa's ice powers as being from a 1,000-year time gap after the last alignment of Saturn... the ice volcanoes of Enceladus say hello.

    Why did it take Kristoff so long to get back to the castle? 
  • In the climax, after Kristoff drops Anna off at the castle, it seems to take him much longer to get back while galloping downhill at breakneck speed than he spent walking slowly and dejectedly uphill while leaving.
    • Maybe he had an initial burst of speed to leave the castle behind him as fast as possible, and then slowed down to give Sven a rest. Also, on the way down, he and Sven were fighting through a wicked snowstorm.

    Inexplicable sword-shattering 
  • So why did striking the frozen Anna make Hans' sword shatter and produce a force wave knocking him back?
    • Magical Ice or concentrated power of love, take your pick.
    • If you look closely, the sword ices over just before it hits frozen Anna's hand, likely making the sword all the more brittle, so that probably helped.
    • Still doesn't explain the force wave, which is clearly magical.
    • Because Elsa wanted to protect Anna.
    • If you make iron or steel cold enough, it becomes extremely brittle (also explaining how Elsa got out of the shackles). The shockwave could have been caused by the magic that froze the sword as it struck Anna's hand, which might have been connected to the freezing-curse or an instinctive reaction from Elsa.
    • I'm sure I've read that even temperatures that are survivable to humans can make some steel- steel that contains a lot of sulphur, mostly made before modern industrial processes- weak enough to break with sufficient impact (the Titanic allegedly seems to have had this issue). Now, Hans' sword does not look like ones made in the 19th century... and given his Blue Blood, there's a good chance that it's been passed down the family for a few centuries, so really wasn't produced by modern smelting, so wasn't up to being taken down to well-below freezing (cold enough to spontaneously frost over its surface) and then hitting a very hard object.
    • I thought the shockwave was from the spell finishing freezing over Anna, since the next shot is her last breath. Note that there's a shockwave from Elsa's shock, horror, and misery when Hans tells her Anna died. That shockwave stopped the storm.
  • Possible alternate explanation: In many mythologies and stories, winter is tied not just to ice magic, but also to death and entropy. It's possible that the "flash" of winter magic given off by Anna's transformation created little lines where the metal rusted or dissolved.
  • There's also the sound of a shockwave- though not nearly that strong- when Elsa breaks down and the snow stops falling. Perhaps it's something to do with Elsa's magic messing about with the air pressure?
  • One 'save scene' was actually going to include Hans getting back up with the remains of his sword and trying again, and the sisters were trying to protect each other when Kristoff would have stepped in and punched him down. And though I would sell a kidney to see that, the writers obviously didn't want to take away from Anna's rescue, or were worried about showing Kristoff hitting Hans after Hans mentioned having bullying brothers.

     Gloves vs. Shackles 
  • It will be a stupid question, i know, but it bugs me: How does Elsa's gloves work? They are not magical gloves made by the trolls or anything like this, they are ordinary gloves. And yet Elsa has much less trouble with controlling her magic when she has them on (or much more trouble without them). How is that even possible? What's even more puzzling: the solid, metal cuffs Elsa was chained with turned to ice and broke quickly - and she was chained for a short while only. How come the gloves were not damaged in the slightest after so many years of wearing them day in, day out?
    • A good chunk of the gloves' effectiveness strikes me as psychosomatic. Elsa is not in direct contact with something, therefore it will not freeze as readily. As for the shackles? Those she wants to destroy, and I suspect that if she ever wanted the gloves off half as badly as one would want to remove the chains keeping her in a cell where she is about to be killed out of hand, the gloves would be a memory.
    • Elsa's powers were growing stronger as she got older. Perhaps they also got stronger as she started using them more, kinda like Chronicle. So by the time she was captured, her powers had grown to the point where gloves wouldn't stop her as well anymore.
    • The plot made a big deal of the fact that every time Elsa lost control of her powers, it was because of fear. The gloves didn't need to actually do anything as long as Elsa was conditioned from childhood to believe they would block her powers, so she would be confident in the knowledge that she couldn't harm anyone while wearing them, even if it wasn't objectively true.
    • We see Elsa using her powers many times with her feet and her shoes don't do anything to stop it, so I'm guessing the gloves were a psychological measure. (unless her foot magic only works when she has her hands uncovered)
    • Even when casting magic with her feet, although she stomps on the ground for dramatic effect as an adult, in the childhood ballroom scene the magic works when her feet are resting on the ground while she cradles Anna in her arms. Pretty much confirms psychological measure.
    • I figured the gloves were winter gloves, much the same way Elsa seems to be wearing a formal winter dress to her coronation. It's just that they were keeping the cold from escaping outside instead of the other way around. The shackles are metal, and metal tends to conduct temperatures pretty well. Given how fast she could frost up her windows as a little girl and the coronation paraphernalia, it shouldn't be surprising that the shackles started icing up quickly. Also, as was mentioned above, her powers are emotion based, and the shackles didn't start icing until after Elsa woke up and realized they were there. Combined with the freaking out that resulted in the castle getting iced over, the shackles didn't stand a chance.
    • It's also not uncommon in fantasy stories for silk to block magic so maybe her gloves were made of silk and that helped her contain her powers.
  • Actually, this is pretty simple. When she was wearing gloves, she didn't want to use her powers, had no idea how strong she was, and wanted to keep everything hidden, the gloves were to stop her from icing over anything that touched her skin. When she was shackled she was a somewhat liberated, uber powerful Frost Witch who darned well wanted to get free and knew what she was capable of.
    • The gloves give her a barrier between herself and the world, even if it's only in her mind. Notice at the coronation how she visibly relaxes once she puts the gloves back on? And how the ones that her father gave her as a child were thin, silk gloves that wouldn't stop the wind, let alone the powers of a Physical God? The gloves basically function as a Security Blanket for her. Throwing her glove away on the mountaintop thus becomes another symbol of her growing up and leaving the past behind her.
  • Elsa's powers get stronger as she gets more stressed. By the time she is locked in the cell, she's so stressed that not even metal shackles can contain her powers.

    Trading with Weselton 
  • Probably not very relevant, but why did Elsa decide to end Arendelle's business with Weselton? I mean, sure, the duke was an insufferable prick, but is that really a good enough reason to break relations with your biggest trading partner because of one corrupt duke (who might not be the one to hold ruling authority in Weselton in the first place)?
    • The Duke tried to have Elsa killed; it's not just a disagreement over territory or trade, he tried to assassinate the Head-Of-State of a friendly nation. That qualifies as an act of war (looking back at human history, wars have been started over less). If all that happened to Weselton was losing Arendelle as a trade partner, they got off light, especially considering Elsa's powers.
    • The Duke gave the orders in a low tone. How could anyone prove that he ordered them to kill the queen? And why would the Duke admit to it?
    • Because both men were wearing Weselton's uniform, which she'd recognize from the coronation (Elsa probably also recognizes the men in question as being the Duke's soldiers, since she did see them respond to the Duke's order to stop her). They were also the only two people attacking her and it clearly isn't out of panic or desperation; you can tell (and presumably Elsa can see) that they have the concentrated and emotionless looks of professional hitmen. Meanwhile, the rest of them are Arendelle soldiers and Hans, who are trying to talk to her. The Duke might not admit it, but killing a foreign queen (even a witch one) probably isn't something a pair of nameless thugs wouldn't decide on their own and Elsa's sharp enough to know that. Particularly when the Duke was the first one to start screaming "monster!"
    • There also could have been off-screen imprisonment and/or interrogation.
    • This isn't a direct answer to your question, but I think it's worth noting a few things: 1) the Duke is introduced by an Arendelle servant as being from "Weaseltown" even at the beginning - conceivably an accident, but also possibly indicating a long-standing rivalry; 2) the Duke claims that Weselton is Arendelle's biggest trading partner but he also claims to be good at dancing (or so he thinks); and 3) at the end, when the Duke is told trade is cut off, we also see another foreign delegate agreeing to take Hans back to the Southern Isles, and being thanked by a representative of Arendelle. Elsa clearly spent some time talking to her guests and making arrangements to clean up her mess. She had time to think about her decision and to make new arrangements if necessary to compensate for the lost trade.
    • These three points are plausible, as well as a few more. Weselton may not be 'Weaseltown', but language studies would suggest that the 'ton' in Weselton means that it mostly consists of a large town or a small city with connections to trade routes, as well as some surrounding land; a feudal duchy, not a kingdomnote . Also, the fact that Kai, who is trained and accustomed to talk politely and know countries like the back of his hand, calls the country 'Weaseltown' implies that Weselton is a) militarily weak, b) is a pain to have diplomacy with, and c) held in contempt by the majority of countries present. All in all, even if the Duke were to bring about war on Arendelle, it would probably get scorn from the other kingdoms and nations, as well as great problems with trade with all of its partners - not to mention Arendelle's military is likely to prevail, or that Elsa could easily freeze the sea around Weselton, preventing it from both trading and launching a fleet.
    • A duke is a relatively (considering the ranks we are talking about here) low ranking member of the royalty, coming in below King, Archduke, Grand Duke, and Prince. This implies that, whatever power he has, the Duke has a Prince or King over him. When he is returned to Weselton in chains with a message from Elsa saying "He tried to assassinate the Queen of Arendelle, your most important ally/partner, so I am severing all ties with you", it is meant as a message to whatever monarch the Duke is under that he has royally screwed up and that monarch needs to un-screw the situation, likely at the Duke's expense, if they hope to regain Arendelle as an ally/partner.
    • Unless Weselton is an independent duchy rather than a city within a kingdom.
    • No it's not. For example, the younger brother of the heir to the throne of England (the Prince of Wales- though the current one, for added confusion, is also titled Duke of Cornwell) is officially titled "The Duke of York." Not only are Dukes high-ranking nobilty, some are princes and even expected to inherit the throne.
    • Also, the Dukes of Saxe-Colburg actually were rulers of a small nation, as were the Dukes of Tuscany, and others.
    • Within the period there is still such a notion as a 'city state'. Size doesn't necessarily relate to economic and political impact, particularly in terms of trading nations and who controls critical ports.
    • It's also worth noting that its the Duke who refers to Arendelle as their "biggest trade partner" not the other way around. Arendelle's top trade partner could be someone else. That could mean that while Weselton's trade industry would suffer, Arendelle's might not.
  • In addition to everything else, there's also the question of if the Duke's response to Elsa's revealing her powers might have been aberrant enough to prompt sanctions from several countries. Although everyone seems surprised, the Duke is the only one to call her a sorceress. Given that it's confirmed that magic use is rare but not unheard of in the Frozen and Tangled continuity, it's entirely possible that the behavior of the duke and his close subjects (particularly his soldiers attempting to kill her after she had surrendered peacefully) could be seen as extreme bigotry (the latter possibly also as a war crime).

    Royal Recognition 
  • When the royal family first visits the trolls, the trolls apparently recognize the king on sight. Yet trolls are thought to be a myth by the people of Arendelle, so how do they have that kind of knowledge of what the king looks like? Further, when Kristoff brings Anna to their home, no mention is made of how she is a princess despite the aforementioned knowledge of the royalty of Arendelle. That their adopted son is in love with a princess is something you would think would at least be noticed.
    • Was the king not in uniform? Perhaps the trolls know enough of Arendelle to recognize how the royal family would dress. As far as Anna goes, maybe that was part of the whole "we need to get these two hitched" song. The trolls are gold diggers! Ha!
    • Well how exactly do you recognise a girl who is now in her late teens when you first saw her at age five once? Plus Anna was wearing a cloak over her dress and she didn't really look very princess-like at the time. And Anna hadn't been outside the palace for years so they would have a slim chance of knowing what she looks like these days.
    • Plus, it's made clear that the Trolls don't see humans often, so it's likely they'd remember what the few that they *have* seen look like. And as far as I can tell, Anna's the only human with auburn hair and white streaks in it, a clear sign of the snow magic that had affected her years prior.
    • The king immediately went to the Trolls when Anna got hit with the ice magic, and he knew exactly where to find them. It's pretty obvious that both parties had prior knowledge of each other.
    • Actually, the king didn't know where to find them; he finds the information in a map inside a book.
    • How the trolls recognized the King is pretty easy; it's the same way some Canadian kid who's never even been to England would recognize Queen Elizabeth. The king's face is all over Arendelle's currency, which people might have given the trolls as payment for spells or something, or maybe just dropped in terror when rocks started coming alive around them. But Anna wouldn't be on any money, as the second princess (nor would Elsa most likely, since she was only just coronated like yesterday), so the trolls wouldn't recognize them.
    • If we want to get really technical here, only two trolls recognized the king: the troll that says "it's the king!" and Grand Pabbie; everyone else just kinda took their word for it and stared in awe, so it's possible that no one else recognized Anna.
    • Given that the King has a reliable way of locating the trolls that is kept secret from everyone else, coupled with the fact that he thinks of the idea of going to them so quickly, it's likely that the royal family has had dealings in the past with the trolls, who obviously view themselves as loyal subjects (given how quickly the Grand Pabbie acknowledges the King and how he immediately begins saving Anna), but they aren't supposed to call on them for every little thing (hence why the King can't remember on his own where the trolls live). Odds are that meeting the trolls is part of the coronation/rite of passage for the new monarch, but Elsa missed it from a combination of her father being dead and her having her freak out before that could happen.
    • I like this, as the trolls' existence doesn't seem to be common knowledge. Anna's clearly totally unaware that such things were real.

    Wait a minute Hans, where's your ring? 
  • How come not even ONE person asked Hans about the wedding vows? Not only there is no witness of such event (which is understandable),Hans doesn't have the wedding ring on his finger. Basically, he has NOTHING to prove his rights to the throne of Arendelle. Okay, i understand that Arendelle is in deep crisis because of the eternal winter, but were they REALLY going to accept that someone guy who came here just few days ago is their king because he claims he married a princess who died seconds later? Anyone could say that!
    • He and Anna asked Elsa to marry them at the coronation in the presence of multiple witnesses. Also, Anna previously left him in charge, and he proved himself caring about the people in their time of need. This should be enough proof not to question Hans' authority at the time of a succession crisis, not to mention the problem with eternal winter that still needs to be resolved.
    • A ring is not necessary, but two witnesses are, and Hans' account of their vows and Anna's death does not mention any witnesses.
    • Agreed with the above explanation, but would like to also add that many witnesses also witnessed Anna telling Hans to "kiss me right now" before giving them privacy. She clearly was into him. Also, a ring is not technically needed for a marriage.
    • Consider also that at the point this is all happening, the Queen is destroying the kingdom with magic snow and has been imprisoned, her sister — who, the last anyone here saw or heard, was clearly not far from death — has apparently just died and they're all in imminent danger of freezing to death. At this point, they're probably just functioning in a crisis-mode state of thought where they want to get the immediately pressing we're-in-imminent-danger-of-freezing-to-death problem sorted out first and then address all the legal niceties.
    • It wouldn't be difficult in the slightest for Hans to bribe or pressure two servants into saying they were in the room, and heard the vows. That's a detail to be fussed out after he's King.
    • Hans' general MO is Bavarian Fire Drill now, while everyone's panicking, tie up the loose ends later (or don't; he may show no sign of the explosive temper often associated with The Sociopath, but maybe 'impulsiveness' explains why not all of his schemes, on close inspection, are as thought-through as they seem.)

    Troll memory magic, part two 
  • The trolls changed Anna's memory so instead of making a snowman in the middle of the room, she remembers that she and Elsa were building ordinary snowman, during ordinary winter. While being OUTSIDE the palace. Why Anna never questioned her parents on the fact the she remembers that once she and Elsa were allowed to go outside (I suspect they weren't from the start, that's why Elsa was making snow INSIDE the castle) and now not only they can't leave, they can't even meet each other?
    • Remember they are princesses and Elsa is the heir to the throne. The Queen and the King could simply say that Anna, as she is getting older, should start to behave like a proper princess - which means, no contact with the commoners. And Elsa, as the next in line for the throne, is way too busy with learning all those things needed for a queen to have time for her sister. It would have worked even better if Anna also got a set of things she is "supposed to" learn to be a Proper Lady.
    • And as for the fact that Elsa was making snow inside, in the particular scene that's shown, it's the middle of the night when Anna and Elsa get up to play. They're probably not going to be running outside in the middle of the night, and they live in a castle with lots of huge empty rooms, so why not just go to the closest ballroom to play? It's closer, safer, and warmer than going outside.
    • As for why she never questioned her parents on why they're not allowed to go outside any more, even if we remove the 'magical ice powers' element Anna had still suffered a head injury and, even when becoming a teenager, was clearly very naturally disposed towards being clumsy; it would not be that hard for her parents to concoct a story about her, say, banging her head after slipping on some wet rocks while playing outside and telling her that it was too dangerous for her to play outside the castle grounds any more.

    Was Anna neglected by her parents? 
  • Think about it. During the "Do you want to build a snowmen" song, Anna is all alone. The only time she is seen with her parents is when she hugs them goodbye.
    • Plus, we also see them more with Elsa and Anna by herself because it's establishing the drama of Elsa's developing powers and her struggles to hide them and her increasing disconnect from Anna — for all we know, their parents devoted as much time as they could to Anna, we just didn't see it because it wasn't relevant to the story that was being told.
    • Anna's relationship with her parents seems to be relatively warm and loving during the few times when they are shown together, so it doesn't seem particularly likely. In fact, her ability to let her parents leave without trouble and trust that they'll return ( as tragic as that ends up being) is contrasted with Elsa's absolute horror at the idea that they're leaving, to help set up the difference between Anna's apparently normal relationship with her family and Elsa's terrified fear of losing them.

     Ok, so why did Kristoff take her back? 
After we find out that only love can thaw Anna's frozen heart, the trolls suggest that perhaps True Love's Kiss would thaw her, and that makes Anna's mind cast immediately to Hans. Ok, I understand that. However, why did Kristoff agree to take her down to him? Didn't he say to her not a day before that "you can't marry someone you just met," and want to dissuade her from being with Hans? Why take her back, especially since he probably figured out by that time how much he cared about her?
  • It doesn't matter what he wants. Anna is convinced that Hans is her true love. They're engaged, so as far as Kristoff knows, Hans thinks that, too. Whether or not it fits his standards doesn't matter anymore: Anna is dying and needs help now. He loves her so much that he's willing to take her back to her fiancé rather than see her die.
  • Anna's mind doesn't cast back to Hans. Kristoff is the one who suddenly makes the connection between true love and Hans (despite his better judgement and earlier disbelief that Anna and Hans could genuinely be in true love, it's the only idea he can come up with), then tells/reminds/advises Anna that she needs to get back to Hans. Anna's own thoughts are elsewhere - throughout the troll's musical number (especially the "people make bad choices when..." lines) Anna is clearly thinking about *Elsa* and taking in the advice in relation to the recent confrontation with her sister, rather than being distracted about Hans, Kristoff or anyone else. If her freezing heart hadn't been in play to debilitate her, Anna probably would have headed back to Elsa after hearing the trolls' advice and used their lessons to fix everything. When Kristoff says "we need to get you back to Hans", Anna's response is clearly dazed and confused, agreeing only because at that moment she's not thinking straight. Had Anna been more lucid she would likely have refused his idea and tried to return to Elsa.
  • Kristoff may think that the commitment Anna made to Hans was stupid and probably made for all the wrong reasons, but it was made, and is still to be respected as a marital relationship (that might become something more substantial, in time- after all, Kristoff has never met Hans so can't judge how good a chance they have.) Hell, one could argue that Anna eschewing the emotional infidelity that proximity to Kristoff may be tempting her to and returning to her fiancé could count as an Act of True Love in itself. And as Kristoff really cares about her happiness, he probably wants to stop making it hard for her to do the right thing.
    • In fact he takes her back for the same reason that he called her out for getting engaged so quickly in the first place: because under the Grumpy Bear exterior he's a guy with strong values and believes a promise to marry is a very serious step to be respected as such.
  • I feel like the guy's self-esteem is on the low side, and it's combined with some denial. He doesn't really believe Anna could love him. Better that she get back to this prince who she does love and who loves her. The idea that Hans turns out to be... well... Hans, doesn't really occur to him (Kristoff suspected Hans might not be perfect but it wasn't like anyone could foresee him being like that). He's just too worried about Anna, to think about his own happiness. That's what Olaf meant.

    Would killing Elsa have really solved the eternal winter? 
  • Do we have any prove that if the duke/Hans killed Elsa, the eternal winter would end? There were cases that the person responsible for a certain curse were the only one who could remove it, and killing her/him would mean that the curse were irreversible...
    • No, but after Elsa stopped subconsciously supporting the winter, it likely would have eventually thawed by itself. Note that Hans only tries to kill Elsa as a last resort, and before that, tries to reason with her first, only switching to plan B after she reveals she doesn't know how to stop it. As for the Duke, he was prejudiced and not thinking rationally.

     Ice-obssesed guy seeks normal girl why? 
  • Kristoff loves ice. It's damn near a canon Cargo Ship. When he and Anna reach the ice palace, he wants to go in and explore, outright stating his love of ice. So, he starts dating the girl he has no romantic sparks with, who he knows full well has a sister who generates ice. The first two thirds of movie, up through Hans' Face-Heel Turn sets up the idea that Elsa and Kristoff will hit it off over their mutual love of ice, and that still could have happened after Hans. In fact, that would make more sense then the Kristoff-Anna Romantic Plot Tumor.
    • Because just because you like something doesn't mean you're going to look for it in your love interests. Ironically, the ice likes ice attraction is one of the main reasons Elsa and Jack Frost are being shipped so much.
    • I saw Kristoff's ice-love as a Red Herring towards his attraction to Elsa, making Hans' Evil All Along reveal all the more surprising. Also, Kristoff and Elsa are both pretty similar in temperament, Anna works the Opposites Attract angle.
    • Uh, guys? When was it ever so much as hinted that Kristoff is attracted to Elsa in any way? And what on earth makes you think Elsa would so readily reciprocate just because the guy "loves ice?" Loving ice is different than wanting to date a girl with ice powers, and just because Elsa has these powers doesn't mean she shares the same "love" for it as Kristoff. Plus, even if you honestly think that has anything to do with his love life, isn't it just as good to be dating a girl whose sister makes ice, or for that matter to live in a kingdom ruled by such a person?
  • And consider the personality traits that Elsa and Kristoff do have in common- neither of them open up or socialise very easily. It's going to be a long courtship if they have to take her sister and his reindeer on every date for the first year or so, and if you have hangups about mixing with people, someone who has similar problems isn't always the best person to form a relationship with. (It's not much more sensible than Anna's idea that she and Hans were meant for each other because they're both seemingly quite childish. Even on the face of it, being with someone just like themselves can bring out the worst in a person, not the best.)
  • I like burritos, but that doesn't mean I'm fated to fall in love with somebody who cooks in a Mexican restaurant.
  • It makes for a good fake-out for the viewers, especially with Kristoff's blond hair. But at the start, he's not really thinking about love; he's thinking about his ice business. Once Anna (ANNA, remember?) has gotten him to open up a little, you also realise that he is consistently aware that he is basically the scrapings off society's boots. Then in the Ice Palace, Anna and Elsa are arguing. I always assumed that Kristoff was wandering around downstairs saying "This is freaking AWESOME. I want to get to know the chick who did this - and I mean know!" Then he hears the argument getting worse and worse. Oh, so not good. He runs up the stairs and gets there just in time to see Anna take an Ice Blast to the heart, as we see him catch her. Elsa doesn't want to know Kristoff, and Kristoff realises that Elsa is very dangerous. Okay, time to go. And on top of that, this sorceress casts Snow Bouncer, who makes a spirited attempt at killing them. That sort of thing is kind of off-putting. By the time Elsa isn't crazy, Kristoff is in love with Anna.

     Anna's clothes 
  • Why would Anna's clothes turn to ice when her body did? I understand that the Doylist explanation is that it looks better for everything to be frozen, but can anybody offer a reasonable in-universe reason for her clothes to turn to ice as well?
    • Not to be *that* guy or anything but magic. Maybe her heart froze with enough spare energy to freeze her clothes as well?
    • Same reason that Medusa turns people to statues with stone clothes: It's easier and it (arguably) looks cooler.
    • Anything touching her skin froze, probably. Her clothes were snuggled right up to her freezing body, so the magic froze them too.
    • This would also support the sword-shattering thing—because it was only in contact for a split second (right at the moment the transformation reached the spot it hit), it was supercooled (making it very brittle) but not turned completely to ice. The shockwave could then have been caused by the magic escaping or shorting out when it shattered.

     Just how wrong were the king and queen? 
  • So it's pretty much a fact that hiding Elsa away from the world was not a good idea and teaching her to fear her powers was wrong. However, was teaching her to keep her emotions in check really so wrong? When Elsa is growing up and is scared of her magic, her father tells her, "getting upset only makes it worse." And he's right. Sure, Elsa's figures out how to stop the winter by the end of the movie, but she's still not very much in control of her emotions. What if sometime in the future she loses her temper and freezes Arendelle over again? Consider a person in real life who has anger issues and lashes out at people when they get angry. You would teach them to control their anger and not let it get the best of them right? Elsa's parents were trying to teach her to control her emotions, not suppress them. I think a lot of people forget that.
    • That's true, but they still did a piss poor job of it either way. Perhaps their deaths had something to do with it but at the end of the day Elsa still grew up terrified of herself and her parents have a good deal of the blame for that. It seems that based on Elsa's sayings, "conceal, don't feel", "be the good girl you always have to be" her parents equated suppressing her emotions to controlling them. And it worked right up until she snapped.
    • There's some belief that it was a misunderstanding on Elsa's part, hence the shortening of the mantra from "conceal it, don't feel it" to "conceal, don't feel." The king wasn't trying to teach her to control her emotions so much as stop thinking about her powers. It's more like ignoring an itch so you don't scratch it. Controlling her emotions was about keeping calm and working through the manifestation. You can think about it like learning a new skill. Don't allow your frustration at failures to prevent you from focusing on the task of learning. With enough practice, everything will start falling into place until it becomes easier and easier.
    • The King wasn't trying to help Elsa control her powers; he was helping her to restrain them. They knew that her powers flared out of control when Elsa felt strong emotions, such as the time she shot Anna in the head in panic, so he was trying to make her into The Stoic in order to suppress her powers. Unfortunately, that backfired because they didn't give her a healthy outlet for her emotions, leading to her powers manifesting out of her control whenever she got emotional about something. Given how quickly she was accused of sorcery, it's not surprising that he did this, but it's the source of the problem in the film: If Elsa had found a healthy outlet for her emotions instead of bottling them up, she wouldn't have been having the outbursts that lead to her self-imposed exile.
    • How about this: The King, like most of the north European elite of the 19th century, was also brought up to be The Stoic- meaning that he's a rather repressed man who's horribly ill-equipped to deal with a child like Elsa. This is, after all, the generation most associated with the Madwoman in the Attic trope.
    • Also, please note that the King, even if he referred to doctors, would be using pre-Freudian psychology. As in pre-psychology-actually-existing. The whole concept of "healthy outlet for emotions" is a new concept, and quite frankly, the whole concept of emotional health didn't exist back then.
    • Also, even if the King understood that it wasn't so much that Elsa needed to get a tighter grip on herself (which is Elsa's interpretation, and it doesn't work) just saying to someone "Relax, stop worrying!" doesn't work when it's coming from someone who's very worried themselves. This was why Anna could lead Elsa to her breakthrough when their father never found the way.

     Eternal Winter? 
  • What proof do we have that Elsa truly did set off an eternal winter? There's about one day between Elsa's initial freak out that froze everything and Anna telling her she froze everything, making her freak out again. If everything was going to thaw naturally, it might take more time than that. Note that the weather seems pretty calm and sunny when Elsa is herself calm. Why does everyone in-universe and out assume the winter is never going away unless Elsa counters it herself?
    • Most likely because it's been brought on by magic. Not to mention, the duke does say that the temperature is getting colder and colder, so there was the very real worry that even if the winter didn't last forever, everybody in Arendelle might have frozen to death before it thawed.
    • The only ice thing Elsa makes that is ever shown to melt of it's own accord is Olaf, and a previous guess notes that perhaps her "living ice" magic isn't as stable as the rest, because life itself isn't eternal but ice and snow is in some places like mountaintops and Antarctica. It can be assumed that the rooms she froze in the castle before the events of the film were melted by love subconsciously, because natural heat doesn't melt her ice, as seen when the firelit room Anna is in freezes over. Presumably, since Arendelle seems to have reasonably hot summers based on how fast Olaf starts to melt, if natural heat could thaw, the summer temperatures would have. Since they didn't, it makes sense that everyone in-universe assumed that the winter was eternal. Out of universe, like I said; only Olaf ever melts due to natural heat. Unless Elsa wishes it through love, the snow won't melt. That's why her dress didn't melt despite the summer, and why Olaf's personal flurrymakes it cold for him, but doesn't leave snow deposits on the ground around him.
    • Olaf may be the only ice that melts on his own, but he is also the only bit we see having prolonged exposure to intense heat without additional magic fueling it. The fire freezing over can easily be that the cold Elsa was outputting was enough to overcome the heat of the fire. Arendelle is based off a Danish fairy tale and Kristoff is explicitly a Sami, the indigenous people of Norway, Sweden, etc. That indicates that their summers aren't particularly hot. I'm no weather expert, but I suspect that a massive cold front like the one Elsa generated wouldn't just go away. Especially since there's only one day in between Elsa's initial freak out that caused the winter and Anna's visit, which made her freak out again. That one day did have reasonably nice weather, sunny and windless, and when Elsa is fueling the winter the weather gets worse again. Leading to the question, what if she just stopped fueling it?
    • Elsa left a frozen trail during her trip to visit the trolls. Obviously, it melted rather sooner than later, and it should have done on its own.
    • The only person who outright calls it eternal is Anna, who isn't exactly notable for thinking before she acts.

     How isolated was Elsa? 
  • It's made clear that growing up, Elsa was secluded in her room for a lot of the time, and that she did not interact with Anna they way she did when they were little. When they talk at the coronation, Anna is clearly nervous, uncomfortable, and unused to talking to Elsa. However, just how isolated was she? It seems unlikely that Elsa would have literally lived out her entire childhood and adolescence in her room, or that she never spoke to Anna at all in the years they grew up. After all, she does come out to say goodbye to her parents. Did Anna and Elsa ever pass in the hallways of the castle, or have meals together with their parents? Just how often did Anna and Elsa see each other after Elsa decided to shut herself away?
    • According to the picture book, Elsa did come out of her room but she wore gloves and didn't speak to Anna.
    • In particular it has Elsa knowing how Anna dresses, how messy Anna's room is; Anna knowing that Elsa liked proper tea, and was cooped up in the study (not bedroom) and enjoying it (the weirdo.) There's even a picture of Elsa watching (in a dressing room mirror) Anna run by, with a smile on both faces.
    • You don't have to never meet for your younger sibling to want to spend more time with you.
    • Elsa wasn't necessarily completely isolated. Do You Wanna Build a Snowman is mostly about wanting to play and be "best buddies" again, and only after their parents' death does Anna say "People are asking where you've been." (If she had been completely shut up for ten years or so by that point, they would surely have ceased to bother.) Most likely Elsa moved about the castle freely and participated in family things, but avoided being alone with Anna, and especially playing with her. After all, it was in exactly that situation that she hurt Anna. Whenever Anna's nagging got to her, she shut herself in her room, to keep Anna away for both of their sakes (she thought).
    • Agreed, but I would still say that Elsa spent the better part of her time in her room.
    • Also, Elsa would probably have just been making excuses for various things of pressing time, like how she pawned Anna off on the Duke because she doesn't dance. Especially after their parents died, Elsa probably had a lot of tutoring on her duties and international relations. Who knows how she would have handled any meetings.
    • I think Elsa is allowed to leave her own room, but her various 'issues'- shame, depression, generalised anxiety- mean that she starts to avoid doing so if she could.
    • A Sister More Like Me says that Elsa 'needed peace and quiet'- introverted people often need a certain amount of 'alone time' and it's not necessarily unhealthy for them.

    Troll chief,it's all your fault! 
  • I've got the impression that it wasn't the childhood accident that traumatized Elsa so much. Yeah, she seemed scared at first but mostly calmed down after Pabble healed(more or less) Anna. And then he just HAD to show her that it is entirely possible that the townspeople will treat her as a monster and kill her. Actually, i think this was one of the reasons why Queen and King kept Elsa in the castle - not only so she wouldn't hurt anyone but also so she wouldn't get hurt (and looking at the Duke of Weselton, you have admit they had a point in doing that). But was it really necessary to show her that? If he kept that thing to himself(or told quietly the King and Queen that Elsa's power may be dangerous), Elsa probably would be much less scared to use her powers, practised them more often and thus gain control of them much sooner. That way, the whole "isolate the whole castle from the outside world" situation would have ended much earlier. But how was she supposed to use her powers if after injuring her younger sister she is bluntly told she may be considered a monster by her subjects? And her parents were as much terrified of what the troll said as she was?
    • I think it's fair to say that trolls think differently than humans. Presumably, they did not correctly guess how the royal family would react to the knowledge.
    • Agreed. The Grand Pabbie was trying to tell the King that "Fear will be the enemy" i.e. Elsa needs to accept her powers rather than live in fear of what would happen if she lost control. The royals misunderstood this incredibly clear, non-vague message. The Grand Pabbie tends to give advice in ways that can be interpreted in many ways, such as his "act of true love" hint later.
    • Actually, what the image shows is a little ambiguous- an adult version of Elsa stands between two groups of people, casting magic, which seems to explode overhead- the people's gestures go from wonder to terror, and then the whole thing is sucked inwards- may have appeared as the people pouncing on Elsa but may also have just been Pabbie collapsing the illusion. True, Elsa and the King probably saw it in the most threatening way possible, but they were both still on edge at the time.

    Did they really think it was normal? 
  • Okay, so Queen and King spend most of their time in Elsa's room. So they MUST have heard Anna's singing about how she wants to play with her sister and how she's bored. And they didn't anything with it? Were they thinking that it is an absolutely normal behavior for a child to spend every day singing at her sister's bedroom door? They could make up something to tell Anna - even if it was the above explanation of how Elsa is busy with learning how to be a High Queen (etiquette, kingdom finances, basic law, how to not freeze the knight while giving him her blessing and so on) and that Anna should start to behave like a princess too.
    • The singing may well have been a narrative device rather than something she actually did for a significant portion of the time. And there is no reason to think that such an explanation was given, but Anna was lonely enough that it did not help.
    • Or, as above, the isolation wasn't so much enforced by the parents as by Elsa herself. There's only so much you can do by telling a child to go play someone when said child clearly doesn't want to. Furthermore, the king and queen aren't dealing with "normal", they're dealing with a child with ice powers, and making it up as they go along.
    • Possibly they were aware that it wasn't optimal, but considered it a back burner problem compared to Elsa's trouble. When Anna eventually stopped asking Elsa to play, the thinking was likely, "Well that solved itself then."

    Treason? 
  • I'm sorry, but this keeps bugging me. If Elsa was queen, how was killing Anna treason? She's the Queen, so her word is law, and besides, royalty kill siblings all the time, especially in ye olden days.
    • One, Frozen seems to take place in the Early Modern period rather than in the Middle Ages.note  And even if Arendelle is an absolute monarchy, it still doesn't give Elsa the right to murder people without reason, especially her own royal family. If Elsa really wanted to kill Anna (she didn't, but not the point), there should at least have been a trial and execution per due process, otherwise the indiscriminate spilling of royal blood could well provoke a revolt and/or foreign intervention. Besides, by that point, Elsa had already been imprisoned for summoning the winter and it hadn't helped matters, so the nobles were probably just eager for an excuse to get rid of her.
    • Killing the heir presumptive to the throne without proper legal process would be treason in many jurisdictions, even if the killer is the monarch.
    • That line also might about been about 'she's clearly betrayed the country by 'attacking' us with winter and killing the heir'. Even if it's not the case, one simply has to say that in Arendelle, it is treason to kill anyone of the royal family without just cause.
    • It's a matter of a number of very delicate circumstances. When Elsa exiled herself, she effectively renounced the throne to her sister Anna. Thus, Princesses Rule came in play as Anna became Arendelle's official ruler. Anna left Hans in charge when she went to find Elsa, so Hans became the acting ruler. Hans rules over Arendelle for most of the winter spell (three days or so), before the official ruler, Anna, comes back. Anna has been struck by her sister, who exiled herself but is still evidently within the kingdom (as Oaken is one of her subjects despite living out on the mountain). Therefore, Elsa, now little more than a peasant all but in title, fatally struck the kingdom's then-official ruler, Princess Anna, who then returns to the castle with this news that she's dying because of the exiled Queen. Then, as far as anyone's concerned, Anna, still the official ruler of Arendelle, weds Hans, which gives Hans official rule in Arendelle, rather than acting rule as he is the husband of the kingdom's current ruler. When Anna dies, that leaves Hans the sole person ruling the kingdom, as Anna has died and Elsa is no longer an official ruler. She's the ruler only in title (why Hans calls her "Queen Elsa"), but she has no actual power. Hans claiming to be married to Anna was to give him official status as Arendelle's prince, not just to make it look like he's acting the part of a grieving widower. Because Hans was the sole official ruler of Arendelle (again, as far as anyone but he and Anna knew), he could charge Elsa with treason for murdering one of the kingdom's official rulers. No different than someone murdering a Queen. That's just my take on it, though. TL;DR: Hans was the official ruler of Arendelle at the time he issued the order, not Elsa.
    • This film REALLY needed a Regent who could point out how pathetically unstable Hans' claim to the throne was. First he was put in temporary command by Anna - who as a princess has no right to do so. He 'married' Anna without a priest, documents, or witnesses, and she died minutes later, and nobody even has a body yet. Elsa, Sorceress or not, has just been crowned the queen, and is legally so until an official abdication. And yet the lords accept Hans' order to execute her.
    • Additionally the Regent could have gone to fetch Kristoff. It would have made his return more believable - despite not knowing that Hans' kiss wouldn't work or even that Elsa was in danger, Kristoff was riding Sven really Big Damn Heroes.
    • As pointed out on the Trivia page, there was going to be a regent in the film, but he was ultimately cut.

    Anna the Child Bride 
I just realized something that should be obvious: Elsa is the elder sibling who was crowned when she came of age. This makes Anna underage, so even if Elsa had been cool with her engagement with Hans, could they even get married? The way Anna talked about it made it sound like they were getting married next week.
  • By coronation day, Elsa is 21 and Anna is 18. Old enough to get married.
    • Could be like drinking age. By 18 Anna is legally an adult, but is still too young to officially occupy the throne.
  • If Anna was underage, then her request for Elsa's blessing wasn't just a desire for her sister to be happy for her — she needed her legal guardian's official permission to get married.
    • In the 1800s, "of age" meant 21. Of course, this is a Disney movie. Remember Ariel, married off at 16? Sleeping Beauty took place on Aurora's 16th birthday, and she was happily engaged by movie's end. Heck, not two generations ago, it was commonplace for couples to get married at 17-18.
The reason why Anna needed to ask Elsa's permission is that even though Anna is what we would considered to be 'of age'.
  • In many European legal traditions there was/is a gap- some of them as long as nine years- between an age where it's legal to marry with your parent/guardian's consent, and being 'of age', when one could marry without their involvement (legally- socially is another matter)

  • Anyone in line to the throne needs to get permission from the monarch to marry (if they fail to get it and go ahead with the marriage, the monarch has legal grounds to cut them out of the line of succession.) So Anna's age is actually irrelevant, it's her status as Elsa's sister that's the issue. (Come to that, Hans should have been asking permission from the King of the Southern Isles before he proposed- though since it looks like he came to Arendelle already intending to get married, he may have covered that matter of business in advance. A good real life explain of what happens if one doesn't ask for blessing is what happened to either Mary or Catherine Grey, yes sisters of the nine day Queen Jane Grey.

     Does Marshmallow know about summer? 
Olaf somehow knows about that season but not what happens to snow (at least until the end, when Elsa made that cloud appear over Olaf's head to keep him cool). But does Marshmallow know about summer, let alone what happens to ice and snow around that time?
  • Possibly. But he also probably doesn't care, if the north mountain is cold enough to sustain snow year-round.
  • There are places in the Alps and the Himalayas where snow above 15,000 feet can last into the late summer, and there's a ski area in Oregon that operates year round, so it's easy to assume the natural weather that high on the North Mountain is probably pretty cold.

     Elsa the queen. 
  • At the end of the movie, how did Elsa convince the people that she was still fit to rule after nearly destroying the kingdom, instead of abdicating the throne in favor of Anna?
    • To be fair, take their individual personalities into account. Elsa is calm, diplomatic and as the heiress apparent for the majority/all of her childhood was reared to be queen. Anna meanwhile is impulsive, naive and what's more, has no knowledge of how to rule a kingdom. Yes, Elsa inadvertently caused an eternal winter... but she got rid of it on her own. At the end of the film, she is clearly in control of her powers, so the people would've accepted her as their queen. Foreign enemies on the other hand...
    • Anna probably wouldn't have accepted the throne, even if everyone insisted she take it. And with Elsa having control over her powers, it would be very beneficial to have her as the queen. Not only is she basically a one-woman army (Enemy army on the way by land? Oh, sorry, but I can stop you with a blizzard that makes the roads impassible for your supplies! Enemy navy sailing in? It's so easy to re-freeze the fjord so they can't get within striking distance!), but she can ensure that there's no damage from cold or ice, stop freak snowstorms, and give everyone all the winter fun they could want (courtyard-wide ice rink, anyone?)
    • A near-inevitable counterargument would be that Elsa is not likely to abandon Arendelle if she is asked to step down by the populace. Of course if the populace would trust her as a linchpin of their defensive strategy... why on Earth would they not trust her as Head of State? Especially compared to, well, Anna?
    • Another counter-argument, there were two foreign enemies who attempted assassination plots against her. All the freezing could be explained to all who were not in the need-to-know circle as defensive measures or part of either Hans's or the Duke's plot from the beginning. The counter argument would be coming from two people who were known have attempted regicide. It wouldn't be difficult to convince people.
    • Seems like it would take a lot of courage to tell your home-grown Snow Queen who just froze the kingdom that you don't want her. This is probably not a person you want to make mad or angry.
      • Considering Elsa could hardly be described as malevolent, it's doubtful she'd purposefully freeze someone or the kingdom for telling her she's not wanted.
      • It doesn't matter what Elsa would do, all that matters in regards to that is what they think she'll do.

     Line of succession after Anna. 
  • In the real world, you cannot inherit a throne by marriage. If Elsa and Anna both died childless, the throne would pass to the late king's eldest brother, then his children, etc. For Hans' plan to work, he'd have to kill Elsa before she married and had children. His power would derive from his marriage to Anna: he'd share power with Queen Anna as her Prince Consort or, after Anna died, rule in the stead of their eldest son (or eldest daughter if they had no sons) until the young king came of age as Prince Regent. And for that, his marriage to Anna needs to last at least nine months. For safety's sake, he'd want to father several children before killing her to take the regency.
    • Either a Chessmaster was willing to put in a lot of time and effort into a plan that it would be common knowledge wouldn't work, or Arendelle's laws of succession are different. Considering they vary wildly in the real world, I don't think this is a problem.
    • Actually, Hans' original plan (marry Anna, bump off Elsa, use Anna as a puppet or simply claim authority on the basis of jure uxoris and Anna's lack of training) fits this line of succession very well. Once Elsa revealed her powers and ran off, everything was improvisation in the hopes of becoming a hero to either surviving sister and the populace at large. The attempted "Monster Slaying" at the end came off as a last resort move to become the peoples' choice through general heroism.
    • Given how we see Anna act, it would seem like getting power from her would be simple. It just takes one night at a party to get her trust him enough to leave him in charge of Arendelle. His plan very well could have been to slowly use her trust to get her to hand over more and more power and responsibilities to him, until he was doing everything important and she was basically just a figurehead.
    • I doubt Hans would have had a problem with killing the mother of his children and brainwashing their first born successor into being his puppet so he could rule as The Man Behind the Man for the rest of his life.
    • Why murder Anna when she'd be just as puppetable? He probably does like her and feel attracted to her- when he's been knocked under the boat in the fjörd, the audience sees him give a really sweet-looking, charmed smile at how cute Anna is. It's just as in-character for him to ply her up with sweet words for the rest of her life and then be able to brag to his brothers that he got the willing hand of the beautiful Princess of Arendelle and saved her from a wretched life with her mad, dangerous sister while quietly manipulating Anna into letting him basically rule.
    • Simply put, Hans never planned on killing Anna. He planned on marrying her and killing Elsa. It's also not clear on whether he cared about actual ruling, just about having his own kingdom.
    • This is actually how he almost becomes King at the end. Since there don't seem to be any other members of the royal family to fall back on (ignoring the Word of God that Rapunzel was Elsa and Anna's cousin), then Hans could be made King by virtue of the royal family going extinct and him saving the kingdom in their stead.
    • That's the sort of thing succession wars are made of. Hans would claim that Rapunzel was ineligible for the throne of Arrandale because she's the crown princess of another kingdom. Hans seemed to be banking on the scenario that if his claim were disputed by other royals that the people of Arrandale would side with him, going to war if necessary, and possibly that the Southern Isles would back him up, if only to pawn Hans off on somebody else.
  • There's no particular reason why Arendelle's laws might not be entirely different from any real world rules regarding this sort of thing. Beyond that, though, Hans' goal may have been to have the wealth and prestige of being a king consort rather than to actually rule the kingdom. Not much of either comes with being the 13th in line for the throne, relatively speaking.
    • Princes Consort in the 19th century could often be more powerful than their title suggested anyway: partly because of how the era saw the role of a husband, and partly because, well, families the size of the one Hans comes from were more or less the norm for the ruling classes, and a combination of medical beliefs (that women needed bed rest for months before and after childbirth) and prudishness (that a proper lady never appeared in public visibly pregnant) meant that, for example, Queen Vicky didn't get much of a look-in politically for many years while having her nine kids, and most of her duties were actually being taken by Prince Albert.
    • Realistically, even with Elsa still alive, Hans has opportunity to make himself the man behind the woman to his sister-in-law. Elsa's brilliant, but she's a fragile shut-in who never had any say in whether she took power or not- he's slightly older than her, very cunning, is a powerful, charismatic personality and has enormous will to be a leader. Plus, as he's assessed that Elsa is unwilling to marry, as her brother-in-law it would still make him the highest-ranking male in the country, which- the world being the way it was in those days- would give him a lot of clout politically.

     How in the world was this originally supposed to end? 
The official word is that Hans was not originally a villain, but if that had been the case, there would have been no one to attack Elsa in the climax and, thus, no need for Anna to save her. So where was their "act of true love" originally going to come from? How could Anna have possibly been saved in a version of the story without another villain attacking her sister? Unless the entire story was vastly, vastly changed, the whole "made a villain at the last minute" claim seems exaggerated — the character couldn't have been changed to a villain that late in the writing process for the story to work.
  • Elsa was originally a villain. We can only assume that the original script was very different from the final version.
    • They were still writing the songs when Elsa was changed to an Anti-Villain. And "Let It Go" was the first song written. The songs and voice-overs are recorded earlier than animation is completed. After realising Elsa wouldn't be the main villain, they likely changed tack and did some heavy rewriting.
  • This is more or less explained by the Spring Pageant outtake on the deluxe soundtrack album. In the original concept of the film, there was a troll prophecy about unending winter, that seemed to ambiguously imply that killing someone with a sword would end the curse. It also casts Elsa in a bad light as a "ruler with a frozen heart." With Elsa's bad attitude in the original script, it's easy to see a misguided or jerky-but-not-villainous character being inspired to stab her in the hopes of saving Arendelle.
    With blasts of cold will come dark art
    And a ruler with a frozen heart
    All will perish in snow and ice
    Unless you are freed with a sword sacrifice
    • Come on, all we need to do is eliminate that Bond Villian speech, change it to a "I'm sorry. I don't love you. I just wanted your kingdom. However, I will avenge you and make this right", and Hans's motivations could easily be that of a misguided good guy.
    • Which could explain why Hans was shifted from a mere Admiral to a 'spare' prince in his own right: the Admiral quite liked Anna but had to ultimately admit that her most attractive feature was the wealth promotion to royalty that came with her- presumably the Admiral wasn't set on getting rid of the sister and making himself king. That would make his gold-digging motives just about acceptably grey without their being the dastartlyist dastardliness that Prince Hans eventually committed. After all, the shocking thing about Hans' attitude to the marriage isn't that it's mercenary (that's hereditary power for you) but the deceitful way he behaved about it. Plus, a low-born Admiral could feasibly have really needed the status of a wife above his station to be accepted, so made more sympathetic.

     No dating before marriage? How 18th century of you. 
  • Why is Anna marrying Hans after a day treated like it's absurd and archaic by Elsa and Kristoff? This a story which is presumably taking place in the 18th/19th century, where arranged marriages would still be fairly common. I understand that the film is an Anachronism Stew and that the aesop revolves around deconstructing love at first sight. But it just seems completely inconsistent with the time period that characters would find the absence of courtship between Anna and Hans so shocking.
    • There's a difference between an arranged political marriage and meeting some guy at a party and deciding that you're in love and must get married immediately—making that sort of decision in a fit of unthinking passion is one of the things arranged marriages are supposed to prevent.
    • An arranged political marriage would have required correspondence between Elsa (as Anna's guardian) and Hans' family. This would have taken several months as letters went back and forth, during which a proper courtship could take place. Elsa and Kristoff were more shocked at the speed with which Anna entered the engagement. If Hans hadn't done something obviously treasonous, their engagement would have been legally binding and breaking it would have caused offence and embarrassment on all sides.
    • In most real-life cases, a member of the royal family—especially the heir apparent—had to get the permission of the monarch to marry. Elsa explicitly stated that Anna and Hans did not have her permission as queen. The "engagement" was therefore nonexistent and not legally binding.
    • Not to mention that this movie is clearly not historically accurate. We have no idea what is normal in Arandelle, except that marrying a guy you just met isn't.
    • And even in arranged marriages, the betrothed wouldn't first meet on their wedding day. The families usually made sure their was some interaction before marriage, sometimes going as far as to send the bride to live with her future husband's family.
  • If we're going by courtship norms of the 18th/early 19th century, Anna and Hans' behaviour is bordering on outrageous. Going off into the garden together for a chat with no chaperone? Going out for a midnight stroll together, without having even introduced him to Elsa, let alone having her permission? If you look at norms of the era, he'd be asking Elsa's consent even to write letters to Anna, and probably would know that the social expectation would be that Elsa would expect to be allowed to read them too!

    Winter garments 
Anna's riding on a horse wearing nothing but a flimsy cloak is implied to not take much time, but she was on there long enough for all-but-one of the winter clothes in Oaken's shop to be sold out?
  • That "Winter Department" of his was clearly no more than a corner where he had dumped all the scraps that had been left unsold since last winter. Look at real life: The best time to buy cheap Christmas ornaments are in January. Those clothes were the only ones that had been there for months.

    Where are the Arendelle nobility when needed? 
The country enters on crisis-mode, the royal family is disappeared ... and foreigners seem to take charge of the kingdom. I know that Anna left Hans in charge, but it seems he only discuss his decisions (including things like arresting, sentencing to death and killing the Queen) with foreign dignataries. Where are the local noblemen, ministers of the government, judges, etc.? Don't they have anything to say?
  • Since Hans was (presumably) visiting Arendelle for the first time, he might not have been acquainted with officials other than the royals. Or, considering his plans to take over the throne, he might have disregarded any officials from Arendelle, as they might've just gotten in the way. This could also explain why he only seems to associate with the Duke of Weselton: since Weselton was Arendelle's biggest trading partner until Elsa signed the declaration that ended this, the Duke might have been the closest person Hans knew to an Arendelle official (as he would probably have some knowledge of and stake in the kingdom). Hans might have also only really associated with the Duke because he agreed with Hans' plans to kill Elsa.
  • So Hans, the scheming Chessmaster plotting to take over the kingdom, couldn't be bothered to suss out what the local power structure was. And then, when the kingdom is in crisis and a foreigner seizes power based on the vague, hasty decree of the heir-apparent (not the reigning monarch), that local power structure... saw that he was ignoring them, decided they weren't needed, and wandered off to watch Game of Thrones. That makes sense.
  • When Anna left to go find Elsa, she left Hans in charge. Anna's word might just be really important.
  • With Elsa AWOL and angsting, Anna was in charge. Leaving Hans in charge meant that he could hold his own council, and he chose to discuss it with those who had no real authority over the kingdom. Serves as a great Foreshadowing of his later betrayal, actually. Most likely, the Arendellian authorities were tasked with keeping everyone alive during the Freeze, while he covered it up by claiming that he was handling the foreign dignitaries.

    Why would Elsa create Marshmallow? 
  • Elsa's supposedly isolated herself to protect Anna and Arendelle, yet she creates Marshmallow, a gigantic sentient ice golem to throw Anna and Kristoff out. Marshmallow, who later chases Anna off a cliff. Anna gets away from Marshmallow unharmed, but never occurred to Elsa that maybe sending an ice monster after her little sister might result in Anna getting hurt? Seems to this troper like it would have just been easier if Elsa created a slide of ice under their feet to get Kristoff and Anna out of the palace and then just destroy the ice bridge if she wanted to be isolated.
    • Elsa is in great emotional turmoil at that point in the movie. Not only does that make it harder to think clearly, it also apparently screws with her control over her powers (hence the whole accidental winter thing). At a guess, Marshmallow was just supposed to harmlessly remove Kristoff and Anna, and then block them—and anyone else—from coming inside until she could get her control back. But because of her emotional state when she made him, he was nasty and violent, and the predictable happened. As for why she didn't make an ice slide? Because as she knows all too well, that's not safe either.
    • Also note that Marshmallow isn't that nasty and violent, not towards Anna and Kristoff. He just grabs them and relatively gently deposits them outside the castle. Even after Anna angers him, all he really does is roar and stomp a lot, he doesn't actually hurt them. Even when they're dangling right in front of his face and he could grab them and squash them in his hand, all he does is shout at them to go away. He didn't throw them off the cliff, both times they went over the edge it was Anna's decision. The movie makes it seem like Anna narrowly saves herself and Kristoff from him by cutting the rope, but it was probably unnecessary. Whatever he was planning to do with them after shouting at them was not going to be fatal, otherwise there would have been no point in telling them not to come back. Overall I get a "grumpy old man trying to scare some cheeky whippersnappers straight and perhaps enjoying it a little too much" kind of vibe from Marshmallow. It's different with the soldiers, of course, but they did pull out their weapons the moment they saw him, so their hostile intentions were pretty clear.
    • Like Olaf, Marshmallow isn't completely under Elsa's control but has its own personality and autonomy. While it obeys orders from Elsa, it's up to its own judgement to interpret whether "make them leave" equals "just throw them out" or "squash them flat".
    • Olaf and Marshmellow seem to have their personalities based on Elsa's state of mind at the time. Olaf was created when she was obviously reminiscing about her happier times with Anna, hence his "I love warm hugs" mentality and child-like innocence. Marshmellow was based on her thoughts of "GTFO!" and thus was geared towards acting like a bouncer.
    What happened to Anna's self-preservation instinct? 
  • She's only, like, four years old and we've seen her jump off a tall pile of snow with nothing to catch her that should have broken an arm from the fall alone even without the magical problems, and fall down an entire staircase taking enough damage to ruin her bike. How can she be that stupid and not have died long, long before getting 'Frozen'? I mean I realize she thought Elsa would magically fix her despite Elsa basically shouting at her she was going to get herself killed, but... that makes her stupid decisions worse, I think. Not to mention all the stuff she does as an adult, starting with her inability to change into winter clothes. I find her incredibly cute and like her as a character, but she seems suicidal pretty much everywhere except when she actually does get herself killed, for Elsa's sake.
    • She's reckless. This is in contrast to Elsa's controlled nature. Anna doesn't hold back, Elsa does. Both love and trust each other, but Elsa holds some of that back—if she didn't, Anna would not have been in danger.
    • She is the Red Oni to Elsa's Blue. Anna is impulsive and doesn't think through the consequences of her actions. She wants to get married to a guy she's known for the length of a single song. She runs off into a blizzard without even stopping to grab gloves (while leaving said suitor in charge of her entire kingdom). She attacks 30 foot tall snow monsters. She jumps off cliffs. It's a part of her personality: she is the type to jump in without looking, and every so often (like when she got shot in the head or when she accepted Hans' proposal), it's going to come back and bite her in the ass. That's why she is shown taking it slowly with Kristoff at the end. She has learned her lesson about impulsivity and is going to develop her relationship with him properly.
     Mascara and Ice Shadow? 
  • Even ignoring Elsa's ice powers including lip gloss for no stated reason, why is her idea of an 'empowered' appearance so... Playboy bunny? Lots of make-up, high heels, a skirt that will show her ice-underwear if she took a wide enough step, a cleavage window despite the long sleeves... How does any of that make sense?
    • She'd been going by, and was rebelling against, the motto 'conceal, don't feel'. Only natural that she go for an outfit embodying 'show it, feel it'.
    • The slit in her skirt only goes a few inches above her knee, and the sheer part of her dress is not a cleavage window, as she's not showing any cleavage, just her shoulders (which Anna's formalwear does as well.) Showing a little leg would still probably be daring in her society (although it is a fantasy kingdom) but her outfit is pretty tastefully sexy by modern standards and I think people are re-imagining that slit to be higher than it is.
    • For proof. Based off of that picture, Elsa would have needed to be doing the splits (or maybe an impossibly high kick) before there was any danger of her undergarments being exposed.
    • Agreeing with the above troper. While there was some sexuality to her outfit, it was never ever used for Male Gaze purposes and it is clearly Elsa expressing herself. Probably too many creators use "she's expressing herself!" as an excuse to put their characters in ridiculous skimpy outfits, but this is not one of them.
    • Also, "lots of makeup" is an exaggeration. A little bit of lip gloss, mascara and a light eyeshadow (it's much lighter in the movie) is a pretty normal, everyday look. It's not like she has raccoon eyes or falsies. And royalty has always worn makeup, in any time period, sometimes far worse than Elsa's. Some girls use makeup as a form of self-expression (thus, empowerment), not necessarily to look pleasing, and it's quite obvious Elsa isn't trying to please anyone if she plans to live in isolation.
    • Actually, looking closely at the coronation scenes, it's more or less the same make-up as she was already wearing, just maybe with a slight glisten to it. It looks different because the coronation was lit by bright summer light or warm candlelight; the ice palace is lit by blueish light which makes Elsa's complexion seem even paler, so making the make-up show up more in contrast. And mascara... well, if you look at the shots of Elsa as a small child, she seems to just naturally have huge black eyelashes.
      • Beyond that, the light actually changes the make-up look itself: the lipstick that looked a soft pink in the yellow light now looks deeply pink, and the eyeshadow that was a soft brown-grey-purple colour now looks a strong purple. (When the tower is lit by a yellow light in the fight scene it looks far less strong again.)
    • Looked at differently- while the dress more-or-less covers what Arendelle society seems to think should be covered, it's very fine fabric (possibly made of ice), and Elsa's transformation takes her from having quite sturdy shoes and stockings to barely-there shoes and bare legs. Her sleeves go from velvet (if you look very closely at the coronation dress you can make out the texture) to being sheer, and she throws her cloak away. Possibly Elsa's avoidance of both touching people and of what she is have lead her to years of wearing unnecessary heavy clothes, when her idea of a comfortable temperature was actually far below what it was for other people, and in her (supposedly) private kingdom she can wear clothes that let her feel the lovely cool air on her skin.
    • I'm one of the camp that wondered why 'Powerful Elsa' wore fewer clothes and more mascara, but I stopped wondering when I realized that the first draft had her as a straightforward villainess. They probably had Elsa's 'Snow Queen' appearance completed before that rewrite, and were operating under the trifecta of Evil Is Sexy, Makeup Is Evil, and Sensible Heroes, Skimpy Villains. It made me grin to picture the reactions in Animators' Alley: "What do you mean, 'now she's a misunderstood emotional shut-in with a sympathetic backstory'? You asked us to design 'Morticia Addams Goes To Aspen'! It's too late to redesign her again!"
    • Great... except that she was actually rather drastically redesigned after her personality overhaul. The sheer sleeves and general slinkiness (described as 'softening her lines') always belonged to Elsa as we now know her.
    • What "cleavage window" are you even talking about? Elsa's blue dress has roughly the same neckline as Anna's coronation gown. Or is Anna too "playboy bunny" for you as well? The slut-shaming here is unneccesary and uncool.

     You're gonna keep them? 
  • "Cuties. I'm gonna keep you." Waaaaait... does this make Kristoff a changeling? (It's much worse if you know your mythology.)
    • Nope, Kristoff didn't have a family before he met the trolls.
    • Indeed, Kristoff explicitly says that he and Sven were alone before the trolls took them in. Why do people keep missing that?
    • Trolls in this movie can tamper with memories. (Not to cross into Ron the Death Eater territory, it's just something to take into account.)
    • Then why was he out on his own with only Sven? The ice guys didn't acknowledge him and even rode away without him! He didn't seem scared or intimidating, even when he was riding out into the middle of the forest. It's clear at this point he doesn't know anyone.
    • Why does he call them friends rather than family? I like to think that his family searched for him and found him after a couple of days, but Kristof had after that time made an connection to the Trolls that made him check back to the once in a while during the years.
    • I don't know why people think this. As stated above, Kristoff explicitly states it was just him and Sven before meeting the trolls. And as he says later, he calls them friends, but they are really more of family to him.

    Royal Recognition 2: Big Summer Blowout Edition 
  • Okay, so when Anna wanders into Oaken's trading post (and sauna!), why is it that Oaken doesn't seem to acknowledge that the Princess of Arendelle just walked in? If Anna's (possibly skewed, admittedly) dialogue is anything to go by, Oaken could have been able to recognize Elsa, because she was the queen. So why not Anna? Did he not realize? Did he maybe just not care?
    • Oaken lives way out in the wilderness, he probably can't recognize the royals on sight. Elsa is wearing a crown, although I'm willing to bet that Anna just over implied Oaken's ability to identify her.
    • It is said that, when Louis XVI tried to escape from Paris, he was recognized in the country because, being the king, his face appeared in French currency.
    • The Princesses have also been hidden away their entire lives until that day — Oaken could never have seen her before this, unless he'd met her as a child.
  • On a similar subject, how did Anna pay for the goods that Kristoff couldn't? She didn't appear to have any coinpurse on her, or any signet ring or something similar she could use to prove to Oaken that he'd be reimbursed by the royal coffers.
    • She was all dressed up for a huge royal ceremony; presumably that little necklace she was wearing was actually worth mad cash. Not to mention her summery ballgown was most likely made with the most expensive material available. She probably bartered her things for the less royal-quality winter clothes and supplies.
    • Alternately she somehow proved she was the Princess and could get money to him as soon as she'd sorted the problem with Elsa. Or she could have suggested he send someone down to Hans at the castle to collect money at her words.
  • She must have come out with money. That's all we can say.
  • Many ways to explain it. Anna could have bartered her expensive (but presently useless-to-her) summer finery and jewelery. She could have proven her royal position to Oaken by reciting the lineage of her family line to a level of detail that most people who wander into a trading post wouldn't have memorized. He simply might have accepted her word as credit - people who can prove that they are fantastically wealthy but are currently short on liquid cash (as a princess wandering in wearing the finest clothes and jewels money can buy would be able to easily establish) would have been able to easily get things on credit. She could have drafted and signed a promissory note in her own name and title authorizing him to draw on the treasury for the value of the goods. She might have a signet ring or seal hidden away on her person somewhere.
    • That said, the bartering is the most likely outcome. Clearly, she wasn't hauling around her summer clothes and fine jewelery on her big adventure. A good runner-up is that she worked out a deal with Oaken where she purchased the goods Sven wanted and her own clothes on credit, with her jewelery and summer clothes - which are clearly worth far, far more than some wintertime supplies and a few carrots - as collateral. Either she comes back with the 50kr he wanted for the goods and can take her clothes and jewels back, or she doesn't, in which case Oaken can claim the goods as his own and make a fantastic profit on them.

    "Bring me my horse!" 
  • Anna has spent the last thirteen years inside the castle. Why does she have a specific horse for her use if she never goes anywhere? Does she just ride around a courtyard or something a lot?
    • "A Sister More Like Me" features Anna riding a pony, chronologically happening after she was estranged from Elsa, so she did practice riding somewhere. The castle courtyard is as good a guess as any.
    • More than riding: "While I galloped on my pony / in the wind and rain and sun". I don't think you can gallop far in a courtyard. I guess if there's a race track.
    • There's no implication that the castle is a prison. The princesses can probably go out, just rarely and carefully controlled.
    • I am fairly certain that that snippet of the song where Anna ran around in the garden, chtting with ducks was Disneys' way to tell us that Anna was not litteraly locked inside. Shame that none lisned.
    • There is a world of difference between having access to a garden, one surrounded by stone walls, and leaving the castle frequently enough and on long enough trips to necessitate having your own, specific horse.
    • She's part of a royal family. Even assuming they didn't have a large enough courtyard or a private field, rich or royal people often own stuff that they don't really need or use.
    • She's a member of a royal family in a rather isolated and difficult-to-navigate terrain; why wouldn't she learn how to ride at some point and have a horse in case she ever needed to ride across land at any point? The castle is also presumably not the be-all and end-all of the Arendale Royal Family's land holdings in that area; I think it's probably safe to assume that they have large spaces of open land available nearby for their own private purposes.
    • Because she has spent the entirety of her life since she was five confined in a castle that sits on an outcropping of rock, the only way off being a bridge into town that is repeatedly stressed that she doesn't go there. The Royal Family could own every speck of land in Arendelle and it wouldn't matter because Anna never leaves the castle's walls.
    • True. But she could still learn to ride within the castle walls. There's a courtyard, after all.
    • This actually explains a lot. Anna learns to ride in the courtyard. But she doesn't learn to ride around the country and so on. That horse ran off really fast at the first sign of danger, whereas if she'd learned to ride it properly, and it had been trained outside of the perfectly safe courtyard, she would have been able to control it and it wouldn't have been so nervous.

     Thirteenth In Line? 
  • The most implausible moment in the whole film: Two beautiful, wealthy, eligible young noblewomen, one about to become queen, and the Southern Isles sends the thirteenth in line for the throne to the coronation ceremony. It's implied that Arendelle is comparatively wealthy and economically stable, as local kingdoms/princedoms go. Hans's twelve brothers would be murdering each other (and quite possibly their wives!) for a chance at Elsa or Anna. How does Hans end up with the duty?
    • Hans' brothers might all be married already and if they are, they are most likely married to noblewomen who are socially equal to or just a bit lower than Elsa and Anna, so there is no need for them to rush off to marry. Hans, being the youngest and unmarried brother, was probably sent to A. be the Southern Isle's representative, and B. woo Elsa or Anna and marry one of them. If Hans and his brothers all married princesses from different kingdoms, that gives their family lots of political power. Think Queen Victoria and how her children married into royal families all across Europe. The line at the end saying that Hans will face his brothers' as punishment implies that they didn't expect him to go crazy and try to kill Elsa for the throne. The Doylist explanation for Hans' place in the succession is so that the audience will understand that Hans has no chance of ever being a king through inheritance.
    • Also, seeing as Hans is the youngest, it makes sense that he'd be forced to go to the kingdom where it'd be hardest to get hitched because it's likely that all his older brothers had snatched up all the "easy" princesses and noblewomen in the area, so Hans was forced to go to one of the few other places with sufficient nobility. And Arendelle was an obviously open choice - remember, Elsa had a reputation as an aloof shut-in whom no one had seen in years, so she probably didn't get many suitors. Hans mentions that he initially came for Elsa before he encountered Anna.
    • Arendelle is based on Denmark and Norway, so it's pretty far north. The 'Southern' Isles might be pretty far away, too far for them to be all that concerned about it, but not too far for a jealous and desperate son to travel to for a chance to seize power.
    • Or, if the allegations that he was mistreated by his family are true, it's very possible that Hans' family was just trying to get rid of him, even temporarily. Perhaps they needed to send a representative but none of the other brothers felt inclined to attend. At that point Hans decided to try to make the best of the situation.
    • I assumed Hans's family hadn't sent him at all, that Hans was there of his own choosing to do his dastardly plan. It explains why it was just him and his horse, and no other assistants - plus at the end "We'll see what his brothers think of this" implies his home may be unawares.
    • Or he talked them into letting him go but they never for a moment took the idea seriously that he'd successfully woo one of the sisters. It doesn't sound like Hans' family think very much of him. Otherwise they'd make use of his abilities instead of letting him go rogue.
    • Since we never get to see the other representatives in detail, it's possible that there was an entire delegation from the Southern Isles, including some of his older brothers. It would be bad form of the highest caliber to send someone so unimportant to such a prestigous event, so it's likely that Hans either joined the delegation without telling anyone or was there as an underling to one of his older brothers and managed to (almost) score himself a princess in the process.
    • I always felt like the deal with Hans was basically, twelve brothers, and you're going to get a bit neglected. That doesn't mean you're abused. And he only mentioned three of his brothers mocking him. He had nine others who didn't, rememeber? To make him feel important, he could have been sent to represent the kingdom. Except he took it as an opportunity to get hitched.

     Snowman Pain Perception 
  • During their quest to and from Elsa's Ice Palace, Olaf is knocked to pieces and even impaled, all without him feeling seriously hurt. However, it's the fireplace inside Arendelle's castle that causes him to show some intolerance for pain (albeit in a calm, Plucky Comic Relief kind of way). Why was it the fire that elicited a pain reaction from him, as opposed to all the instances of him being destroyed, decapitated, and impaled?
    • Maybe because heat and fire would render him a puddle, in the right temperatures, impalement and dismemberment don't actually harm him because he can just put himself back together.
    • Impalement and the like merely rearrange his snow a bit. His arm catching fire, on the other hand, could do some actual damage.

     "I don't see no ring" 
  • Well of course you don't, troll kiddo, because Anna is wearing MITTENS! Can trolls see through clothes or something?
    • They're Comically Missing the Point in order to Troll Kristoff. It's not that hard.
    • The trolls have many magic powers. Them having X-Ray Vision is not a bad assumption. It's not like it matters, though, as Hans never gave Anna a ring in the first place; there's no ring to see.
    • The little troll could have checked. On a re-watch, (starting at exactly two minutes) Kristoff announces that Anna's engaged and several trolls huddle together, discussing the engagement. Ten seconds after the announcement, the little troll pops into the huddle randomly to announce that there is no ring. We don't see Anna again until almost half a minute after the announcement.

     So Elsa has perfect control now? 
  • Okay, Elsa has been battling for control of her powers for 12-13 years by now, and all of a sudden she can control them perfectly after a single Eureka Moment? I get that she now understands how to control her powers, but that's different from being able to actually control them all the time. She can still get upset or become afraid, and she's more used to trying to shut down those emotions rather than deal with them in a healthy way, even if she knows she should calm down. There are times when a person knows being upset or angry won't help a situation, but that doesn't mean they stop being angry because they decide to.
    • Look how quickly she masters her powers once she decides to "Let It Go." With absolutely zero practice in over a decade, she creates a castle, clothing, and sentient life. She just never made the connection before between emotional state and her ability to control her power, since she was actively trying to surpress her powers rather than study them. Anna's comment about true love "thawing" a frozen heart makes the connection in her mind that by using her positive emotions, she can dispell as well as create the snow.
    • Even if she can control her powers, that doesn't meant she will be able to fully control her emotions.
    • When she tried to control her emotions, she bottled them up and lost control at incredibly awkward times. Now that she is in total control of her powers rather than trying to bury them, she won't feel the need to bury her emotions anymore for fear of lashing out. She can express her emotions, which will give her better understanding and control over the emotions that cause accidental ice ages.

    Kristoff's Job 

  • Since at the end of the movie Elsa is the queen and seems completely in control of her powers. Does that put Kristoff out of a job? If the queen walks by a pool of water and touches it every day, you've effectively eliminated the ice business.
    • She has other stuff to do, so ice she makes is largely confined to the castle and immediate environs. Somebody still has to deliver the ice around the kingdom, she just saves him the effort of going out to the lake with a saw (and probably puts a lot of the rest of the industry out of business since delivery-only needs less manpower), besides, they can always export the Ice.
    • Since Kristoff is now Royal Ice Master and Deliverer, that means the Ice Harvesters will all be under his employ anyway and answer to him. Essentially the ice industry of Arendelle will become a government-owned monopoly. Clearly Elsa didn't put Kristoff out of a job because he now works for her.
    • However consider the consequences of doing something like that. If Elsa did walk by a lake or pond and froze it so that the harvesters could collect the ice, slowly but surely the lake would start to dry up. Also the constant shift in temperature caused by Elsa freezing the water and unfreezing it everyday could kill the wildlife in the area.
    • As evidenced by Olaf's personal snow cloud, Elsa has enough of a handle on her powers to create highly localized "endless winters" now.
    • And even if we don't take any of this into account, Anna would probably intervene with her sister to keep her from accidentally sabotaging Kristoff's business, if only by at least letting her know about it.
    • She's the Queen. It's not unreasonable to suggest that she has other duties that will occupy her time other than making ice for Kristoff to move about the place. I strongly suspect that Arendale's methods of procuring ice will take place the same way they did before she came along, and that now she has Elsa will more or less restrict using her ice powers to special occasions.
    • Besides, with Elsa's powers to create ice on command, does the palace really need an official deliverer? It seems like the position was created by Elsa as a way of A) honnoring Kristoff for his actions in protecting Anna, and B) giving him an excuse to around the castle (and her sister) on a regular basis.
    • It's a sinecure job she's created to thank the hero who helped the sisters through their adventures, rather like the Lord Privy Seal. He doesn't have to do any actual work, but he can draw a salary, has status in the government, and can still go and do what he wants elsewhere.
  • The palace might not need to specially order ice, but other people will. And they'll need to deliver it.

    Problem Solved? 

  • So, the ending was sweet and all, but did Elsa actually solve the problem of accidentally ice-blasting her sister? She was fairly in control of her powers before both incidents, after all. Does she now know how to thaw the damage? Or is Anna doomed within the week?
    • First off, I would argue that her power was fairly in control of her during the "blast the heart" incident, and second off, she controlled her powers with instinctive love beforehand (blasting her sister in the head, and thus allowing fear to creep in, made her forget) and has now figured out how to do it manually. I'd be very confident in her ability to remove the damage to Anna's head. Also, Anna's Skunk Stripe vanished when Elsa thawed her out at the end; I wouldn't be surprised if the damage was removed during that same incident.
    • Elsa was in control of her powers only when she was feeling calm. As soon as her mood shifted even slightly, things went to Hell (notice how the castle started to crack while she was freaking out about Arendelle being frozen). Now that she has more control of her emotions, she can prevent freakouts like the one she had when she froze the kingdom.
  • Elsa wasn't 'slightly' losing control. Everything was really messing up. The most terrifying day of her life. All these people might hate and fear her. She might hurt people. Well, now the worst is over. She's not going to burst out so violently now. She's not afraid anymore.

    Economic Damage to Arendelle. 
  • Hasn't Elsa done rather serious economic harm to her kingdom by cutting off all trade with Weselton, Arendelle's biggest trading partner? Granted, the ruler of Weselton had undoubtedly committed hostile acts against Arendelle, but isn't cutting ties with your biggest trading partner cutting off your nose to spite your face? Obviously, nations do from time to time impose economic sanctions on other nations, but usually that's to get the target country to change some specific policy or behavior that the sanctioning country doesn't like. In this case, Elsa seems to have sanctioned Weselton permanently, or at least indefinitely, over past behavior.
    • That depends on how many other prospective trade partners are available to take up the slack and how many of them are willing to give non-exploitativenote  trade terms.
    • Generally speaking, countries, or rather the people within countries, trade with people/countries that it is most profitable to trade with. If Arendellers are doing lots of business with Weseltonners, it's probably because it's most profitable for them to do business with them. There's no way for Arendelle to cut off their biggest trade partner without doing themselves serious economic harm.
    • Since the Duke is more eager to trade with Arendelle than anyone from Arendelle seems to be eager to trade with him, this suggests that it's actually less profitable for Arendelle to continue trade with Weselton than the other way around. And economic circumstances change; just because someone was your best trading partner yesterday doesn't mean they'll be your best trading partner today or tomorrow. In that case, cutting them off might even be better for Arendelle in the long run. In any case, it's also hardly in Arendelle's best interests to continue trade with a partner whose main representative has openly proved himself (and Weselton by extension) to be duplicitous and untrustworthy, since it's likely to suggest that Arendelle is unable to trust Weselton when it comes to their trade relationship as well.
    • Since a Duke is usually subordinate to a King, odds are that her trade embargo with Weselton will be lifted once the King demonstrates suitably his apologies for the Duke's actions, as well as provides proof that the Duke has been properly punished.
      • Given that the Duke of Weaseltown tried to assassinate the Queen and was verging on trying to assassinate said queen's beloved younger sister, as well as colluding with another attempted assassin and would-be usurper, the Duke will be very lucky if "properly punished" constitutes life under house arrest. If he's still somewhat lucky but not very lucky, it would constitute life in the King's dungeons, but most likely - given that he tried to murder an incarnated Physical God, it would take the form of beheading, hanging, or facing the firing squad.

     Power Vacuum in Arendelle 
  • The King and Queen die. In their will they decree that the royal palace will continue to be closed to almost everyone, including servants, and access to the surviving royal family and especially the heir-apparent will be extremely limited. They give none of their reasoning for this and there is no indication that they appoint a regent to ensure that these decrees are enforced. And everybody... just kind of does what they say. Then, something like five years later, the royal palace is re-opened on schedule, the heir-apparent makes her first public appearance in half a decade at her own coronation, and then everything goes to hell, the new queen starts blasting ice everywhere and runs off, and her heir-apparent rides off after her, obviously distressed and not thinking clearly, and shouts something vague to the effect of, "This foreign dude I just met this morning is in charge!" And everybody... just kind of goes along with it. Really? nobody— no regent, or uncle, or steward, or captain of the guard, NOBODY— attempts to grab power? No foreign power invades while Arendelle is apparently entirely without a head of state for years at a time? Nobody questions these very suspicious provisions in the previous monarch's will, and especially nobody questions the authority of this foreigner when it derives solely from a hastily-shouted verbal decree from the heir-apparent and not even the reigning monarch? REALLY?
    • Did you watch the movie? The castle is restricted after Elsa blasts Anna, a full ten years before the king and queen die. "Closed to the public" in this case means that people can't just walk in to the Royal Family's home without permission and that permission is hard to get. You know, the same policy that almost every monarchy in the world has used. None of those were assumed to have no head of state and Elsa having the public coronation despite really not wanting to shows that even she, the one most adamant that she been kept out of sight, believes that she cannot truly hide away forever. Hans being put in charge of Arendelle is unorthodox but perfectly legal. Elsa forfeited the capacity to rule when she ran away, Anna very publicly gave Hans her authority and he had been working hard to ingratiate himself to the people.
    • It was hardly "just" closed to the public: from what we saw, the palace was nearly deserted besides Elsa and Anna. The point is that the kingdom apparently has ZERO nobility or bureaucracy in place between "royalty" at the top and "everybody else" at the bottom, and NOBODY (besides, eventually, Hans) steps in to fill the power vacuum. It makes no sense. In the real world, there is an orderly line of succession from the vice president on down. In a bad enough disaster you might have to go all the way through the Cabinet to figure out who the Acting President is, but there would be one.
    • Who's to say there is no bureaucracy? If there wasn't someone working for the government Arendelle would not exist as a nation. We just never see them because any such people are completely irrelevant to the story. As for the line of succession, Anna giving power to Hans was her completely ignoring it, which would be odd (and stupid, given who he turns out to be) but still completely legal. That's the thing with monarchs, they can pretty much do whatever they want.
    • We did see bureaucracy and/or nobles: there was the guy who told the Duke that they would no longer be trading with him, and also the people Hans talks to when he tells them that Anna is dead.
    • That's the point: if a bureaucracy or noble class existed, it would be very relevant to the story, because it would be an obstacle to Hans' grab for power. It strains credulity that everyone in the nation would blindly follow a dead monarch's decrees if there were no authority enforcing them; but if there were someone enforcing them, where were they when an existential crisis (in the form of an apparently-genocidal witch-queen) befell the kingdom?
    • You're still operating under the mistaken assumption that Hans grabbed power. He was given it, legally, in front of dozens of witnesses, by the heir and acting monarch. The authority here that people are obeying is the law: opposing Hans and trying to wrest power from him at that point would be treason.
    • The question isn't whether it would be right or wrong or legal or illegal. The question is why nobody tries it. It puts an undue strain on Willing Suspension of Disbelief to think that Hans is the only authority in the kingdom after the sisters leave, and that there is apparently no formal authority between the old monarchs' deaths and Elsa emerging from the castle after years of seclusion. A more realistic depiction of Arrendelle's government would have opened up rich storytelling possibilities, but the opportunity is left on the table and the film is poorer for it.
    • And maybe if the movie was specifically about the Arendelle constitutional crisis they would have explored some of those storytelling possibilities, but since the storytellers wanted to focus more on the relationship between Anna and Elsa rather than Hans scheming against the Arendelle bureacracy (because, let's face it, how many kids are likely to be interested in watching what basically is beginning to sound like a Disney version of House of Cards?), they just handwaved it with Anna nominating Hans to be in charge and everyone deferring to him because he was just so darned nice and competent on the surface and got on with the story they wanted to tell.
    • Hans didn't actually take the throne; perhaps there would have been challengers and dissenters, once the shock had worn off. From the time Elsa leaves to the time she returns and fixes everything...that's not even 24 hours, is it?
    • Since Anna left Hans in charge, they likely deferred to him and were focused primarily on providing comfort to the citizenry during the crisis. Unfortunately, this left Hans free to scheme without anyone to stop him.
      • I imagine there's actually quite a large bureaucracy in Arendelle- only they're men who like obscurity and believe in continuity of government above all else (which would make it more of a Disney Yes, Minister). That would explain why it runs for three years when the only obvious authority in the country is not only a minor but doesn't even consider herself competent to rule; and why the monarchical candidates in her absence are left to fight it out among themselves. Arendelle seems to run like a chicken: long after the head has been cut off, the body can keep on dancing. (True as the country looks to be threatened with a famine within weeks they may want a designated ruler to take decisions, and in truth that might be why they fail to interrupt the rise to power of a man whose claim is dubious but who seems to at least have a strong personality that can take tough and unpleasant decisions and is probably prepared to be brutal if the have wheels come off the ship of state. Hell, Hans is decisive and confident enough he's even prepared to take responsibility for nasty things and stand by them, going so far as to try to carry out the death sentence on the previous queen in person. If the Arendelle civil service are really cynical, they could see him as usefully dispensable if people don't like his policies, seeing as he's foreign and nobody has any firm loyalties to him.)

    Failed Act of True Love 
  • Okay, so it's made clear that the only way to save Anna's life from that ice in her heart is with an act of true love. They immediately think "kiss", but the movie went about it by having that act of true love be Anna getting in between Elsa and an attacking Hans to protect her sister. That's all fine and good, because after all, Olaf himself said it earlier, that love was putting someone else's needs before your own, which is exactly what Anna did. But, at that moment, Anna was worried because Olaf had made a fire and would melt if he stuck around, she wanted him to leave or else he'd melt and technically die. But Olaf refused, he stated that he would remain with Anna until true love came to her. But, there was one happening right there! Olaf was in front of a fire, in danger of melting! He was willing to risk his life, his entire existence, just for Anna's sake and well being. If that's not an act of true love, I don't know what is. The fact that that didn't cure Anna's condition just feels like sloppy writing to me.
    • The implication is that Anna herself has to do the act of love, since Kristoff leaving her to live happily ever after with Hans doesn't work either, and was acknowledged to be an act of love.
    • In the climax, Kristoff charges head-on into the storm to find her, Olaf risks melting in order to relight the fire and keep her warm, and Sven throws Kristoff to shore before falling through the ice all perform acts of true love before Anna does, and none of them thaw her heart despite two of them being performed directly for her. Anna herself has to perform an act of true love to thaw her heart.
    • I interpreted it as Elsa's crying and hug that saved Anna, not the sword-blocking. True love can't be one-sided. Anna has always opened her heart up to Elsa, and it took Anna nearly dying for Elsa to finally open up and express her feelings to Anna.

    Why Anna? 
  • Related to the headscratcher immediately above, why did the act of true love have to come from Anna? It wasn't her fault that her heart froze. It was Elsa's fault. Elsa's the one who shot her with the ice magic, even if it was accidental. It makes no sense why Anna should have to make the act of true love when it wasn't even her own fault that her heart froze. Wouldn't it make more sense if Elsa, the perpetrator, was the one to make the act of true love, thereby saving her sister, proving that she isn't wholly destructive, atoning for all those years of neglect, and proving to Anna that she really did do everything just to keep her safe?
    • Though Elsa froze Anna's heart, her own heart wasn't frozen with ice magic. For example: If it's Elsa's fault that Anna got injured, putting a bandage on Elsa wouldn't do anything to fix the damage. The act of True Love had to come from Anna to heal Anna.
    • Basically, 'True Love' would be a mystical heat generated by the heart. It doesn't matter how warm Elsa or Kristoff or whoever's heart gets, the ice in Anna's heart will only melt if the heat is in her heart.
    • OP here. I get what you're saying, but in the context of the story and the Aesop they were trying to deliver, that still doesn't make any sense. Let's go by the first replier's metaphor. Anna's injury was Elsa's fault. Of course putting the bandage on Elsa wouldn't solve anything, she wasn't the one who was hurt, Anna was! What I'm saying is wouldn't it make sense for Elsa to be the one to do the bandaging? Elsa is the person who is supposed to learn the lesson that love will help her control her powers but she's never shown making the step to learn that lesson.
    • Think of Elsa's spell as a brainwash and the solution was a I Know You Are In There Somewhere Fight, so, while other people could help, it was ultimately Anna who had to overcome the spell on her own. True Love's Kiss would have worked, but only because Anna was the one doing the kiss too, not because the other person "rescued" her. I do agree that Elsa learned the lesson too quickly, but then again, her aesop was not about The Power of Love, but about facing her responsibilities instead of Letting it go.
    • Possibly because it wasn't Anna's frozen heart, but Elsa's, that had to be thawed by an act of true love. Since Anna is really the only person who 'loved' Elsa, it had to be her. Only once Elsa's heart was thawed could she undo the magic on Anna.
    • I figure it's mutual. Anna saves Elsa. And Elsa finally opens up her heart to show her own love for Anna. True love is not one-sided.

    Kristoff and the Snow Cutters 
  • What was their relationship? At first I thought one of them was his father, and they were teaching him, but that's never mentioned again after he finds the trolls, and he's mostly treated like an orphan that they adopted. So, there's two possibilities: 1) the trolls semi-kidnapped him when he wandered in, because they made no effort to return him to his family, who he apparently didn't want to go back to, or 2) the Snow Cutters didn't care that a random kid had wandered into the middle of their work site, question where he came from, or show any concern for his well-being.
    • It's possible that the trolls adopted him some time after the night he first sees the trolls. Consider this scenario: Kristoff becomes fascinated with the trolls, and spends all his free time with them. Then something happens with his family: perhaps they become abusive, or his parents die and he is treated cruelly by his foster parents, or some such. This sours him on humanity, and so he runs away from home, and the trolls take him in.
    • I like to think of Kristoff's relationship to the ice miners as being parallel to Hans' relationship to his older brothers. It also explains Kristoff's initial misanthropy pretty well.
    • I think that Kristoff has no known immediate family but the ice-cutters could be very distant relations. Like him, they're implied to be Sami, and he'd presumably be absorbed into the communal mens' work of the siida system, like the ice-cutting, perhaps at an earlier age than normal when he wasn't ready for it or big enough to be of much use. (Doesn't explain the obvious neglect, but presumably he kind of fell between homes and got overlooked.)
    • I always felt like Kristoff worked with the ice-harvesters. But since he doesn't like humans, he goes his own way to sell the ice he harvests. Also, I feel like that night he was clearly struggling to keep up, and got left behind.
    • I liked the idea of him actually assisting in the herding of reindeer in the winter months. Additionally, Sven is a reindeer. Good stock males - which Sven certainly is - are often 'rented out' in the mating season.

    Isn't Anna still the heir? 
  • At the coronation Anna is quite reluctant to stand next to Elsa in front of the crowd. "I'm not the heir" she says but... that doesn't really make sense to me. Elsa doesn't have a husband or child and Elsa doesn't seem to be too keen on making either of those things a reality any time soon, so wouldn't that make Anna Elsa's heir(yeah she probably won't inherit unless Elsa dies childless or abdicates but still...)
    • She's an heir in the sense that she's quite high (second in line, in fact) in the line of succession, but she's not the heir until the coronation is complete and Elsa is crowned queen. Until then, Elsa's the heir-apparent and Anna is second-in-line. Bit of a weird technicality to bring up right that moment, but technically correct.
    • As the responses to the third question noted, Elsa may have been ruling - through decrees and such, rather than publicly - since their parents died. Since she hadn't been crowned yet, though, she'd still be the "heir", rather than the "queen". It wouldn't be surprising if people, or Anna at least, had got into the habit of referring to the ruler as the heir, and Anna's comment is a result of force of habit to describe the title as that. Of course, she actually is now (more or less) the heir, ironically.
    • Anna doesn't say "I'm not the heir," ever during the movie. What she says is "Oh, here? Are you sure, 'cause I don't think I'm supposed to-" She's not saying anything about being the heir, she's just nervous standing so close to her sister. Elsa hasn't talked to Anna at all for most of her life, so it's understandable that Anna would be a little uncomfortable suddenly being so close to her. This is supported by her reaction when Elsa actually starts talking to her.

Actually when Monarch 1 dies (in this case the King) Elsa automatically becomes the new monarch on his death. Sure she doesn't have the coronation for a few years but Queen Elizabeth II didn't either but that didn't make her any less of a queen now did it? And that automatically means the next in line (in this case Anna) is the new heir to the throne coronation or not. I mean look at King George's brother he's known as Edward VIII but he never had a cornation. When there dad (George V?) died Edward VIII came to the throne which automailly made George (known as I believe Albert back then) the new heir (which also made Elizabeth II be third in line)

    The infamous hair glitch 
  • Was it really necessary to get that braid from the back to the front by any means necessary? The shot and framing certainly didn't seem to warrant it.
    • It probably got argued for and against for a while. A single shot in The Incredibles of Bob feeling his supersuit and finding a hole was so complex that many of the animators begged Brad Bird to have it happen offscreen while Bob says there's a hole. They eventually achieved it, though.
    • The Elsa's Hair animator said yes: the Elsa's Body animator said no: and in the resulting power struggle, it was decided to leave it as it was "because it's not like anybody will ever notice."

    Why are both sisters so inhumanly strong? 
  • The film drills it in to the audience's mind that Elsa has magical ice powers that make her impervious to cold. But, um, even without those powers, both Elsa and Anna seem to be inordinately strong and durable, at the very least for teenage girls of slight build, if not for humans in general. In her distress, Elsa casually wanders for miles up the tallest mountain in the vicinity without getting visibly winded, while Anna (among other things) hammer-tosses a bust across a decent-sized room. (even if it were hollow inside, it should still too heavy to throw very far for anyone but an experienced Olympian). Nobody is around to witness these things, but it's enough to wonder whether there are other powers that the sisters just don't notice because they haven't much contact with normals.
    • They were stuck in a castle with loads of free time. A child as energetic as Anna would probably get plenty of exercise. The bust was pure Rule of Funny. When Elsa wandered up the mountain, the entire environment was backing her up; ankle-deep snow doesn't bother her, wind and snow support her, she can circumvent any obstacle, etc.
    • Because Anna and Elsa are Frozone and Mr. Incredible's ancestors, as shown here.
    • Whatever the bust was made of, you're forgetting that it was held up by a cake after she tossed it. It couldn't have been that heavy.
      • Probably plaster treated on the outside to make it look like bronze.

    Elsa's Isolation 
  • So if Elsa really wanted to be alone, why didn't she destroy the bridge that connected her ice castle to the other side of the cliff after she threw out Anna? It would be harder to get to her without climbing the mountain/crossing the cliff first. Doing so would've made her ice castle into a mountain fort, complete with giant snowlem bouncer.
    • Her efforts to rein in her powers seems a sufficient distraction at this point, and her difficulty consciously dismantling her constructs is an additional factor.
    • Well just look at Elsa during the "Let It Go" number. She doesn't seem to be thinking as she's using her powers. She's just having fun with them. She completely forgot about Olaf. She only built the staircase to help her cross the mountain and she probably forgot about it as soon as she'd finished building her castle. Alternately she secretly did want someone to come and find her - the way depressed people secretly want someone to notice their problems.

     How'd they escape? 
  • How did Anna and the Duke get out of the ballroom? I mean, the way Elsa accidentally flung them, they were all pointed inwards, with no way through, and yet 30 seconds later, we see Anna and the Duke see Elsa run away. I guess you could argue that the could jump, but a ballgown would have definitely ripped, and there was nothing of the sort ion that following scene.
    • If you're referring to the spikes (and I'm almost certain you are), the Duke probably had his guards break them. Ice isn't that hard to break, you know.
    • Besides, the ballroom probably has more than one door- the sisters seem to both come in through side entrances when Kai announces them, and when Anna comes in with Hans she comes from a totally different direction to the one Elsa goes off in.

    Treason? Part 2 
  • When the Duke of Weselton questions Hans' loyalty to Princess Anna, Hans responds that he "will not hesitate to protect Arendelle from treason", implying that the Duke's comments were treasonous. But how can the Duke commit treason if he's a representative of another sovereign state?
    • I don't think Hans was threatening the Duke, so much as trying to say that he was working in the best interest of Arendelle and he wouldn't betray Elsa or Anna.
    • This could also be Hans' true nature slipping through; as far as he's concerned, dissent is equitable to treason.
    • Duchies aren't necessarily sovereign territory, the Duchy of Weselton could easily still be part of the kingdom of Arendale according to feudal law, but it has a degree of autonomy that leads to it's being treated almost akin to an independent state. The best example of this is probably the Duchy of Burgundy in France, which often acted as if it wasn't a part of France because that single duchy was wealthier than most of the rest of France combined, but at the same time the king of France was still technically sovereign over the territory.
    • What, so it was supposed to have a little joke scene like the first Spider-Man film?
    Hans: I will not hesitate to protect Arendelle from treason!
    Duke: Sedition.
    Hans: What?!
    Duke: Treason is if it's done by a native. When a foreigner does it, it's sedition.
    Hans: Ah.

    Disney "Princess" Elsa 
  • Why is Elsa referred to as a Disney Princess when by the end, and throughout most of the film, she is a QUEEN? So shouldn't Elsa be acknowledged as such?
    • "Disney Princess" isn't just a descriptor, it's an official franchise. Not every princess who's appeared in a Disney movie is counted as an official Disney Princess, and at least one official Disney Princess (Mulan) cannot in any way be considered royalty.

     If Hans wanted to rule the Southern Isles badly, why didn't he kill all twelve of his brothers? 

  • He was clearly capable of nearly murdering Elsa! Why couldn't he kill all of his brothers?
    • Killing a woman most of her own country currently thinks of as Public Enemy Number One is not in any way comparable to getting away with murdering twelve people without anyone suspecting his involvement. Even if he convincingly makes it look accidental, after the first two or three princes end up dead people are going to take a long, hard look at anyone behind them in the line of succession, and the more murders he commits the more likely it is that he'll slip up in some way or otherwise be found out. Arranging an "accident" for Elsa, as he'd planned to do before she took most of the work out of his hands anyway, is a much lower-risk prospect than trying to off all twelve of his brothers and somehow manage to avoid suspicion enough to still be able to take the throne.
    • Plus, given how old Hans is, it's more than likely that some of his brothers have kids. Even if he killed all his brothers without people suspecting him, he would have to find a way to kill all his nephews and not get caught. Killing Elsa and marrying Anna is really the simpler alternative.
    • Perhaps he tried, when he was below the age of criminal responsibility and so not nearly so good at plotting. It would explain why they don't like him!
    • Arrange twelve accidents!? Wow, even the royalty of The Chronicles of Amber would have regarded that as going a bit far.

     Visible Breath Inconsistency 
  • This is a minor detail, but one of the few that persists for this troper through multiple viewings. Down in Arendelle, Hans and others are shown with visible exhalations. Up on the mountain, Kristoff, Anna, and even Sven don't have those little puffs of condensation despite all the running around they're doing, and even while standing in Elsa's ice palace. During the third act, however, Kristoff and Sven do have visible breath puffs down in Arendelle. Animation oversight, or is there a new level of Shown Their Work regarding atmospheric density or something of the sort at play here?
    • Probably just an animation slip. I know they were deliberately not doing Elsa's right (another Required Secondary Power?)
      • Witness the prison scene with Hans. His breath mists, hers doesn't. That can't be an accident.
      • It does seem consistent (it happens at and just above sea level, doesn't in the mountains) so there probably is a reason for it, real or magical.
      • It's a part of Elsa's Required Secondary Power- not only does she not perceive cold (that wouldn't in itself stop her getting hypothermia and frostbite) but she doesn't loose any body heat as normal human beings do, including not exhaling it.

     Thirteen children? 
  • How the heck can the King and Queen of the Southern Isles have thirteen MALE children? That seems logically impossible in real life. I have no idea if they were lucky enough to get fraternal or identical twins or triplets multiple times, or the creators just threw in the twelve brothers thing at the last minute (which is likely what happened, seeing as how much the film was altered after they decided Elsa wouldn't be evil). Or maybe the creators thought that being thirteenth in line is unlucky!
    • Not impossible, just very unlikely.
    • Let's say that Hans mother gave birth to one child every one or two years, and all of them turned out to be boys. Maybe Hans' mother wanted a girl, but kept having boys, so that's why there are thirteen siblings. Another prediction on why there are thirteen male children-I read an article online that a mom took in six kids from her dying friend's family. Seeing as disease was pretty often in the time the movie takes place, perhaps Hans had a few adopted brothers. Or maybe Hans was an adopted child himself!
    • Check out the Massive Numbered Siblings trope page for how many monarchs of roughly this period had that many kids- and more! Having them all one gender is unlikely, though.
    • In a similar vein to the above response,it's possible that Hans and his brothers don't share the same mother. Given the time period,a woman dying in child birth wouldn't be unusual. In that case maybe Hans's father had more than one wife - hell, for all we know some of those brothers(or even Hans himself!) could've been born from a mistress.
    • Nah, I doubt if Hans could have called himself 'Prince' if he were illegitimate. Unless his hurrying Anna along was so that she didn't have time to check his credentials...
    • Just because Hans is legitimate doesn't mean all of his brothers are though.
    • No, they're ahead of him in succession- they're all legitimate. But they might have different mothers- widowed fathers with young families (and thanks to how dangerous childbirth was, there were a lot of those about) usually did try to provide the kids with a stepmother, and a king is always attractive to somebody.
    • Also, due to the differences between X and Y sperm (X sperm being more endurant and Y sperm being faster) the chances of conceiving one gender over the other can be improved consciously by parents. So Hans' parents could have been trying specifically for boys.
      • Except that even with modern understanding all methods other than selective IVF are so hit-and-miss they're hard to call. And that's since chromosomes were even understood, well into the 20th century.
    • Is it possible that one or both parents had some genetic quirk that meant XX embryos just failed for them? (Actually, if they were related- as royal couples often were- and they both had a 'fault' on an X chromosome...)
    • This is hardly out of the question, Sweyn II of Denmark had at least twenty children over the course of his long reign, eighteen of whom were male. And while that is a remarkable number, it shows that this kind of feat isn't impossible in a situation where a king has been alive long enough. Hell Sweyns brood could very well be the inspiration for Hans back story given how the brothers never really got along.
    • It's more or less equivalent to flipping a coin and getting 13 heads in a row: the odds are something you wouldn't like to bet on, but the laws of physics allow for it just fine. (Come to that, we don't even know if Hans had sisters that he just didn't bother to mention for some reason.)

     How did Elsa not know she froze the kingdom? 
  • Sure, she was hiding in the mountains and likely wouldn't notice it was winter there. However, to get to the mountains she had to run through the countryside, which was covered in snow. Unless she was experiencing some kind of fugue state, Elsa should have realized what she did.
    • She was almost certainly aware that she froze the areas she passed through; she probably just assumed that the effect was localized around her and that it would thaw quickly after she left. That's what always happened before, after all: as a child, she had to be consciously maintaining the effect or it would dissipate. It wasn't the freezing that surprised her, but the fact that it was apparently permanent.
  • In "Let It Go", she at one point declares "Let the storm rage on", which I took (at the time) as her rejecting the kingdom entirely and intentionally continuing the storm, or at least not caring what happened to Arendelle. This seems to clash with her later not knowing that the storm is permanent.

     That is one dainty crown. 
  • The painting of Elsa and Anna's father shows him with a standard European crown. But when Elsa claims the thrown she is given a completely different crown. What happened with the original?
    • Maybe the animators thought the father's crown wouldn't look right on Elsa?
    • European monarchies have often had more than one crown, and made the distinction between the coronation crown and the state crown, which is worn on formal occasions other than coronation. The late king was probably depicted wearing his state crown.
    • She couldn't use the king's crown because the king's crown was probably with the king — who was lost at sea.

     What did they tell her? 
  • Even with the constant knocking and pleas for Elsa to play with her, you cannot tell me Anna didn't ask her parents a few times why her big sister suddenly didn't want to play with her anymore. They had to tell her something to satisfy her, even for just a while, but since they didn't want her to know about Elsa's powers, what could they have possibly told her?
    • Perhaps Elsa's behaviour had become so odd generally they tried (unsuccessfully) to persuade her not to take it personally.

    Why Was Elsa Still The Heir? 
Elsa couldn't control her powers,she'd confined herself to her room and her parents attempts to help her weren't working. Seems to me that something like Queenship would have been (and almost was) too much for Elsa to handle... How could she be a Queen if she couldn't even leave her room? Yet Elsa somehow remained the heir. Why would her parents risk putting an incapable ruler on the throne (by incapable I mean the freezing things when she's upset, that could've - and nearly did - ruin Elsa's reign from the get go) when they had another daughter who didn't have all the problems their eldest did?
  • Presumably the laws of succession didn't allow them to simply disinherit an eldest child by fiat. Besides, they died pretty young. They likely thought they had a lot more time to try to help her through her problems.
  • Historically monarchies have always tried to work with and around unfit heirs rather than replace them outright. Nobilities tend to not want people to start getting the idea that you can pick and choose leaders based on competence or fitness; besides, the point of a monarchy is you get what you're given by God because God has chosen this individual to be King/Queen for a reason.
  • I don't think Elsa spent ALL her time in her room. We see her come out to say good-bye to her parents, and Anna says "People are asking where you've been," which they wouldn't be asking if she was a well-known recluse. Elsa staying in her room during (almost) the entire song...I think it was more metaphorical than literal (just as Anna wasn't singing the same song for 10 years).
  • She didn't spend all her time in that room. Like you said, she's seen saying farewell to the parents, and in "A Sister More Like Me", Anna did see Elsa walking around the palace time to time, but could never get her to talk.
  • Elsa could still rule from behind closed doors, and more importantly, she was actually being properly educated for her future role as a ruler. The alternative being Anna on the throne, if I were their parents, I'd pick the lesser of two evils.
    • How is Anna being queen with Elsa in an advisory role be worse than someone with uncontrollable magic when stressed being constantly placed in stressful situations

    Why the hurry, Hans? 
  • Anna's rush to get engaged is easily explicable (the gates would be closed again next morning, and anyway she's sheltered and naive- but it seems unlikely that she would become totally cut off, at least by letter, to someone she already knew- and she certainly won't be meeting any other men. So why does Hans decide to propose to her behind Elsa's back, when they need the Queen's agreement to marry, and the way he's gone about it would make any responsible guardian (let alone one who seems very uptight) suspicious and hostile? Even if he was courting her honestly, it was silly, albeit maybe in-character for the guy he was pretending to be. The way things actually are, why risk Elsa distrusting him from their first meeting? It's not like on paper he's that inappropriate a person for Anna to marry, if that's what she really wants.
    • I suppose it's plausible that he wanted to drive a wedge (or, rather, an even bigger wedge than was already there) between the sisters. Though even that doesn't make a lot of sense- if Anna defies Elsa to elope with him, then Elsa has grounds- perhaps she'd even be expected- to disinherit her, meaning he's married her for nothing.
    • I highly doubt Elsa would disinherit Anna for that reason, even if it is very foolish. My guess is Hans thought since Elsa was Anna's sister, she'd approve. Anna thought the same, clearly.
    • Maybe not, but Hans can't have exchanged more than a few pleasantries with Elsa (and it's not like Anna and Elsa seem close - they might be as dysfunctional as his own family). You'd think her most reasonable reaction would actually be what she initially does ("Hey, wait, slow down, who is this guy?")
    • Of course Hans is clearly naturally inclined to fly by the seat of his pants, although he usually seems to have thought things through a little better in fact if Hans is what most people assume he is, one of the usual defining traits is impulsiveness and grandiose over-confidence. But Hans doesn't usually seem to conform to those aspects of the definition.
    • Hans was running a gamble that just kept paying off. He tried to charm Anna - and succeeded. He got her alone at the ball and spun her a line - and that succeeded too. He brought the subject around to love at first sight, proposed marriage - and succeeded. Odds are that he hadn't expected things to be this easy and was too far along to back out with a "Well, ask the Queen to let me stay in the castle for a few weeks and then we'll talk about it." It would have broken character.
    • No proposing on the first day before attempting to gain the guardian's trust is what breaks character. The is supposed to be intelligent, manipulative, unassuming and conscious of social norms. No one with his motivations would have acted the way he did in the movie

    Kristoff the lone Ice Harvester 
  • While I know Kristoff isn't really a people person,why is he portrayed as working alone? Ice Harvesting in real life requires at least 20 men(and sometimes more in larger operations)to get the job done yet Kristoff is never even implied to be working with a group(aside from at the beginning of course). How exactly does that work? It'd take more than Kristoff to operate the equipment and what's gonna happen if he falls through the ice? Does Kristoff just freelance or what?
    • I'm guessing here, but I'd expect ice-harvesting to be a seasonal activity, and possibly he meets with a band of guys who do it for a few weeks every year for some money, then go their separate ways, maybe taking on other kinds of work depending on what's needed for the season, like farm work or fish-processing.

    So where does Kristoff live? 
  • The movie seems to implie that Kristoff is homeless when Anna meets him(and probably lived with the trolls full time before)but where does he live now that he's Arendelle's official ice master? Is he still homeless? Does he live at the castle now? or did Elsa arrange for him to live in the village?
    • My guess is Elsa arranged for him to live in Arendelle. It's obvious she approves of Kristoff, so she's not going to let him be homeless if she can do something, but at the same time, it probably wouldn't be appropriate for him to live in the palace with her and Anna, especially since their relationship (Anna and Elsa) is only beginning to be repaired.
    • I'm pretty sure that he'd move into the castle at least after the marriage. Whatever he's doing, Anna is needed there.
    • I'm not sure whether he's so much 'homeless' as itinerant: his job means he's constantly on the move, and sometimes he has to take whatever lodgings he can get.
    • I figured that during the summer months he worked as an ice harvester. During the winter, he would take on the tasks of a winter farm-hand.

    The Troll's guide to raising humans 
  • At the beginning we see Bulda decide to adopt the orphaned Kristoff and Sven but how would trolls know anything about caring for a small human boy? or how to care for a reindeer calf for that matter?
    • Likely nothing. The troll only kept them because they were cute.
    • That's exactly the problem. The trolls know nothing about how to care for a human child, so how exactly did Kristoff survive to adulthood?
    • Well, the trolls might be...er, eccentric, but they're not stupid. As long as they had some common sense, they could figure out the basics. Plus, Kristoff wasn't an infant when they adopted him. He's around the same age as Anna or Elsa. He could tell them when he needed something, and what Sven needs, and the trolls would figure out how to get it and accommodate him.
    • Agreed: also they seem to have been more or less taking care of themselves at the time they met Bulda- Kristoff probably already has a good idea how to cover his own physical needs, but it's more his emotional upbringing that she takes over, something that she seems completely able to do.
    • Although... Sven, on the other hand, is very young, possibly young enough to still be suckling. I guess milk (even reindeer milk, if it's herding country) might not be that hard to acquire, and grazing animals are known to thrive after being bottle- or cup-fed.

    what did the king tell them? 
  • At the beginning of the movie the king decides to limit Elsa's contact with people,this includes cutting down the number of servants and shutting the whole family in the castle. Thing is this also means he must have come up with a story for why he did so but what could he possibly say that would justify firing most of the servants and closing the court?

    • If we can use deleted material as evidence, the song We Know Better suggests that at least those servants who had most contact with the girls must have known something about Elsa's powers, as she wasn't above playing pranks on them.
    • One might just as easily ask why they didn't notice something weird when Elsa was little- she doesn't really seem to be secretive about her magic and if her parents know chances are the staff do. We also don't know when she first started showing it- if there's been something uncanny about her since infancy, presumably most of the servants who attended her would have

noticed something (like if a toddler's tantrums were accompanied by cold winds indoors, say.)
    "Get Anna!" 
  • Elsa has spent most of her life keeping Anna away, including having ejected her with some emphasis from the ice-tower. Yet when Hans has her in the cell, Anna is the first thing she asks for. I'm sure there's a good reason for this, but why?
    • Most likely because she remembered that she unintentionally struck Anna and is worried about her well-being. When Elsa ejected her from the castle, she did so under stress, having just had a panic attack (not to mention her castle was beginning to fall apart). In the cell, she's still stressed, but much calmer due to having just woken up and can think clearly. The movie shows us Elsa's first priority is Anna, so it's understandable her well-being is the first thing that would cross her mind.
    • Okay, although asking "Is Anna okay?" seems a reasonable opener in that case (she may be uneasy with Hans but last time she saw him he was supposed to be romantically involved with Anna, and she doesn't have any reason to believe he's a really bad man.)
    • It feels to me like she wants to make a proper abdication and leave Arandelle, and just wants to get everything straight with Anna before she goes- also that it's appropriate to announce it to Anna in person. Seeing as she probably intends to disappear forever, she probably wants to both try to give Anna some sort of briefing to become queen, and to try to repair their relationship enough to say a proper goodbye.

     Hans's brothers 
  • This is more about WMG/Fridge than the movie, but aren't people assuming a bit too much about Hans's brothers? Unless I'm not remembering something, all we know is he's the youngest of thirteen sons and three of his brothers completely ignored him for two years. Hans has to be at least Anna's age. How is it remotely plausible that being ignored for two years causes someone to be a borderline sociopath (especially in comparison to someone ignored for thirteen years and still growing into an optimistic adult)? There's nothing to suggest all of his brothers were abusive.
    • Actually, what we know is that Hans "says" he was ignored for two years. We don't know if it's true or not. I assume Anna or Elsa could do some digging after the fact.
    • Two years is a long time. And it likely wasn't the only possible mistreatment that occurred. After all, his parents didn't do anything about it.
    • Really most of this comes down to Jennifer Lee's Word of God that Hans had a loveless, miserable upbringing that somehow bent him out of shape. (Presumably he's actually understating the psychological bullying, if that's true. Though that doesn't really sound consistent with his ingratiating personality, does it?)
    • As for Anna, the worst period of being ignored is for three years, from 15 to 18. Before that the affection between her and her parents suggests that they actually have a lot of love for her, even though Elsa maybe takes up a bit more of their time. It's not wholly consistent, though perhaps both Hans and Anna are similar in being somehow underdeveloped personalities, just in different ways. (And Kristoff falls somewhere in between- he seems to have been abandoned by humans and grew up with a front of misanthropy, but it is just a front, he's actually an unselfish and emotionally intelligent guy, maybe because he gets out looking for his next meal in the real world more than the junior royals do.)
    • OP here. I see all of your points. I just find it a bit far-fetched that eleven people (or thirteen, if you want to include his parents) are abusive. Who's to say he wasn't on good terms with some of them and just that bitter about being 13th in line?
      • It is. It totally is. But it's the sort of universe where the far-fetched event is usually the one that happens.
      • In fact the only real evidence from the film is that in his breaking speech to Anna, he makes it sound as if life was obviously a meaningless failure if he never got a crown of his own (unless the words 'I never stood a chance' mean something more general and even more dysfunctional, like 'I never stood a chance of being noticed or respected'- that's conjecture but somehow seems plausible). Which, as most of his brothers won't either, is a bit of a weird attitude for him to have- suggesting The Glorious War Of Sibling Rivalry is still ruling his life (it's not like he's not in a position to use his charm and intelligence to influence either his brother or Elsa). But that's just evidence that he's a bit weird about his brothers.
    • Possibly it wasn't just the bad relationships with his family that made him so dysfunctional as the context they took place in with everyone else: he was born the son of a king and may have been extremely spoiled by the household staff (to the point that he's not even really aware of it.) If all the relationships he's known for much of his life are polarised between a family who seemed to hate him and ordinary people who treated him as a young demigod, it may well have made his personality a bit skewed.
      • Hans' parents probably had very little to do with him. Historically, wealthy people weren't expected to have very much contact with their children; Hans was probably raised by a nanny or governess (or several.) Some governesses were recorded to be very good carers, teachers and substitute parents, but none of them had any training at teaching or childcare and tended to get the job based on their family's status rather than whether they were actually competent, and many governesses were only in the job because it was the only 'respectable' one they could do and resented having to work instead of get married- there are many records of incompetent, neglectful, abusive or downright crazy governesses holding their positions in respectable homes because their charge's parents paid them to just keep the children out of their hair until they were teenagers and never really checked what was going on. They also didn't necessarily stay in one job for long periods of time, which wouldn't have helped children or siblings who already had a troubled dynamic in the nursery.

     No one noticed? 
  • When Elsa takes up the globus and sceptre during the coronation ceremony and presents them to the audience, a lot of ice accumulated on both of them, and somehow not one person sitting in the front row (or anyone else in the audience) noticed, let alone Anna who was standing right next to her?
    • Well, it was extremely improbable.
    • Actually Elsa's face was extremely attention-grabbing. Look how nervous Elsa is while the bishop is saying that Norse stuff. Presumably the crowd notices how nervous she is, and they wonder whether the new queen is going to drop her orb, throw up or faint before the bishop can finish talking.
    • It's also possible a few people did notice, but no one said anything because they didn't want to show disrespect.
      • Looking at the clip again, it isn't actually that obvious- it's not nearly as much as there is on the box and candlestick Elsa practices on in private during her solo in "For The First Time in Forever", and it's very thin and is so thin it could be taken for vapour rather than ice. It could be mistaken for Elsa putting (ironically) warm hands on very cold metal; if it melted quickly even the bishop would think it was a nervous sweat, which wouldn't have been polite to draw attention to.
     Elsa had suitors? 
  • Hans tells Anna, "As queen, Elsa was preferable, but no one was getting anywhere with her." So does that mean Elsa had suitors before? But how? She isolated herself up until her coronation and presumably would've done so after the day was over (if the lyric "It's only for today" is anything to go by). How was she getting suitors? Was Anna rejecting them for her?
    • Easily. I imagine it went something like:
      Letter: My lady Elsa, it would honor me if you would allow me to court—
      Reply Letter: [with the Arandelle crest on top] No.
    • Honestly, the fact that she had isolated herself her entire life in itself means that nobody is getting anywhere with her. It's pretty self evident.
    • Also, when Elsa's parents died, she was eighteen. Easily old enough (or at least Anna obviously thinks so) for people to be wondering why her parents weren't even engaging with other relevant families on the subject of who would be right for Elsa (something which Hans would almost certainly have heard remarked on, seeing as he should at least have been on the list of acceptable bachelors, even if quite low down), even if the marriage itself would be some time off. One assumes they were avoiding the issue waiting for Elsa to get 'controlled' enough to touch people. (Though Elsa probably also got very anxious at the issue, too, given her general manner at eighteen.)
    • He could also have had a good chance to read Elsa's body language at the coronation ball, before he starts putting the moves on Anna in earnest, having guessed that Elsa really wasn't receptive to being courted.

     Where did Hans get the key? 
  • Everyone knows that scene where Hans locks Anna in the library. But where did he get the key? The sound effect of him locking the door definitely sounded like a key being turned in the lock. Unless all the locks in the castle were the same, and there was one key that could be used for all of them, and he kept the key with him at all times. After all, he was left in charge of Arendelle. There might have been a spare key in the library somewhere Anna could have used, but understandably at the time she was in no shape to go looking for a spare key.
    • If I'm remembering correctly, the staff took Anna to Hans in that room. Perhaps he spent a lot of time there when the focus wasn't on him and one of the staff gave him the key if he wanted privacy or something.
      • Or he lifted it from someone and made a copy.
      • I doubt he could copy a key that quickly.
    • The room in question seems to be the monarch's personal study (Elsa is seen composing herself in there, and she has a scene there earlier with her father.) So Hans would probably consider it his right to install himself there, key and all.
    • Possibly the key is kept in the outside of the door. Actually, it would make more sense to keep it on the inside of the door, but perhaps Hans picks it up when the camera cuts to Anna.

     Social Status Strife 
  • By the end of the movie, Anna and Kristoff are in a relationship. Though Elsa has given them permission, wouldn't royals (many of whom placed high priority on social status and believed they were above everyone else) from other states take a dim view of Anna (a Princess) being in a relationship with Kristoff (a commoner)? They do love each other, it's just in those days marriages were viewed as a way to secure an alliance, not something done for love. If Elsa ended up with a commoner, as the reigning monarch, it would be harder to challenge given she's the reigning monarch and not wanting to cross her due to her powers (though it may cause an uproar still), but Anna is a Princess; would that cause strife? would certain types of suitors aspiring to marry Anna (since only one can marry Elsa) try and 'deal with' Kristoff. I don't oppose it, I'm wondering if that would cause problems.
    • Royals marrying commoners in Disney films is as old as Walt's own Cinderella. The previous Disney film even had a princess marry a guy who tried to steal the literal royal crown. In real life at the time, those situations would indeed cause more political strife, but real life doesn't have queens who can create eternal winters either.
    • It feels like by the end it's been confirmed that both sisters have probably missed their chance at being "normal" royalty, but they still do the job just fine, and the people are going to learn to love them as they are. That would be the general dynamic of the ending.
    • To Murder the Hypotenuse might free up Anna for somebody but as only Elsa could make her marry anyone (and maybe not even then) it would be a very long game, as she probably wouldn't be open to suitors for some time, and it would have to be a hit that couldn't possibly be connected to the suitor in question... in short Kristoff is probably no more at risk of this than anyone else that Anna or Elsa might marry.
    • The Anna/Kristoff situation can be compared to the modern day Princess Madeline of Sweden. Madeline is not the crown princess so marriage to a commoner, even a foreigner (Kristoff, technically, is a foreigner to Arendelle) won't trigger a strife given that Elsa gave her the blessing. Modern Swedish crown princess Victoria is married (also to a commoner) with a baby girl though, but Elsa can promise marriage and issue soon to compensate.

     If you're going to Let It Go.. 
  • So, Elsa is free to use her powers at last, and she builds herself an awesome ice castle to live in and then.. just stops? Really? She never tried freezing air or other materials, freezing as hard as she could to see what happened (which, if she could get down to 0 Kelvin, could advance science by a century or more), creating cross-sea trade routes made of ice, freezing fire or seeing how much she can resist fire, seeing how much she can freeze herself with her immunity, or even just Iceman's cool power slides? When she's got confirmation she can create life - and finds she can do it voluntarily - she stops after one golem rather than realizing how this could revolutionize her life and her country? That castle should have been full of experiments, artworks, anything she could think of - it's not like she's going to run out of ice, after all. Dangit, girl, you just became a goddess and that's all you do?
  • She might have got round to it if events hadn't intervened. She might well have got round to it after the film (some fanfics cover this.) She was up there about 48 hours before Anna found her, and after she'd spoken to Anna she was probably trying not to do anything in case she made the situation worse.
  • I think this comic answers that question perfectly.
  • It's not clear whether we see the whole of the ice palace or there are a lot of rooms we don't go into. Certainly there's a lot that we don't see Elsa making in 'Let It Go' (the whole first floor area with the mock-fountain, for example.)
  • I think Elsa might not be making snowmen casually. Creating sentient life that may be functionally immortal isn't to be treated as a party trick.

     This is not how to trick people 
  • Why would Hans even bother telling Anna about his own betrayal? If he really wants to kill Anna, he could have just kissed her anyway - since it would not have been true love's kiss it would not have healed her, but she wouldn't necessarily have realized that (it might take time to work) and only by her death can she get that final confirmation. If he actually succeeds in killing Elsa after telling Anna, he's now got an active queen who can tell everyone else about his betrayal. And why mention that he's going to kill Elsa? It's not as if Anna's going to help him do that..
    • Hans has no reason to believe that killing Elsa would save Anna, especially since she was minutes away from death.
    • Hans seems to have been fairly convinced that Anna didn't survive more than a few minutes after he left her (otherwise presumably he wouldn't have told everyone she was already dead.) Without Olaf breaking in, it's implied he would have been right.
    • Hans has no idea how the 'true love's kiss' actually works- for all he knows it might have been enough that she loved him. (Which she probably doesn't, but that's the sort of emotional fine detail that Hans probably isn't good with himself.) In any case, Hans was probably just taking the chance to take out his sadism on someone who wouldn't tell on him.
      • His real mistake is that when the door was opened Anna would be found collapsed on the floor near the door; if it was how he said she presumably would have been found laid out on the couch or somewhere more comfortable. (It would have been more practical to just smother her, but the film would hardly have got away with that.)

    Who's a perfect girl? 
  • Elsa several times refers to the line "be the good girl you always have to be", or "that perfect girl is gone". But when was Elsa ever told that hiding and concealing herself was necessary to be a "perfect girl"? She and her parents both seemed to be perfectly clear that it was purely to control her powers. If it was supposed to be some expectation of feminine behaviour, wouldn't they have laid into Anna for being totally unlike Elsa?


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