Fridge: 28 Weeks Later

Fridge Horror
  • Many of those who survived in Britain were taken to the film's setting. It's more or less a big screw you to anyone who saw the first film because it means that the first film's protagonists presumably were there and almost certainly were killed if they were there. It more or less makes the whole previous film a huge waste of time following characters who were going to die anyways.
    • There's no guarantee that the protagonists of the first movie would return to the UK after being evacuated. And indeed, given how 28 Days Later ended, the chance that any of them would be willing to live in a military-run quarantine zone is effectively nil.
  • The Infected in France. Think about that. The Virus decimated Britain in four WEEKS. It would spread like wildfire across france, it's neighbouring countries, and eventually Europe, Asia and Africa with only a few areas (the poles, the americas, the asian islands, Australia, New Zealand etc) clear of Infection.
    • Not even the Americas would be safe, really, considering that it wouldn't be impossible for the Infected to make it across the Bering Strait and begin spreading Rage across North America.
    • A disease that virulent can't spread too far before burning itself out, in real life at least. The Infected don't show any incentive to move long distances unless they are chasing after people, so the chances are that after the biggest population centers are clear of the uninfected in one way or another, it becomes a waiting game, and normal people come out on top. Ofcourse millions would likely die before that would happen, ofcourse.
      • While true, a disease that virulent would normally KILL the infected but the Rage virus doesn't. Assuming that they die from starvation or dehydration, the time they could spread the disease would be at least a week or longer (based on the logic of the movies).
    • How is that Fridge horror? That is the entire point of the ending. They wouldn't have SHOWN the Eiffel Tower otherwise.
  • Actually, it depends on geography.
    • France looks doomed, but the Infected don't seem to run unless they see food. Which means after they leave Paris, it won't be so difficult. France is separated (though not entirely) from Spain and Italy by the Pyrenees and the Alps, so not only would the Infected have slight trouble getting over them, the armies could slow them down.
    • During that, the populations of Spain and Portugal (mostly) would be evacuated to European islands and the Azores. Most Italians would go to Corsica, Sicily and Sardinia, the Greeks and those in the Balkans area could go to Greek islands, as well as those previous mentioned; as long as the motorways between them were broken, the Danish could go to the Danish isles; the Scandinavians, as they would be the last in Europe to be Infected, would go to Iceland.
    • The Suez canal, between Egypt and Arabia, would likely have all crossings broken, but if the Infected got to Africa, if they went west into the Sahara, they would be slowed down by the heat. The same would happen if they went through the Alps to Switzerland (the same reason that Switzerland has been a difficult country to invade). That way, some of Africa could be evacuated.
    • In Asia, the Chinese, Koreans, Russians and South Asians could go to Japan, Indonesia, Seychelles and the Maldives, as well as the Indians going to Sri Lanka. The Infected would also be halted by the Russian winter, Himalayas and the deserts, namely the Indus Valley, the Cholistan desert and the Taklamakan desert.
    • The Infected wouldn't be able to cross the Bering Strait unless it completely froze over, though any advances from Russia to Canada via the North Pole will be checked.
    • Also, the directors wanted any sequel, named 28 Months Later to be set in Russia, with the Infected just having reached it. Leaving plenty of time for Asia and Africa to be evacuated.
    • All in all, there will be massive evacuations and disaster, but much slower than expected and some places better off than others, plus a few decades, maybe even over a century, to reform, but it seems as if it won't be that bad.