Fridge: Iron Man

Comics Examples

Fridge Brilliance
  • On a design level, the Renaissance Armor is the next step from the Modular Armor.... if you ignore everything from issue 319 onwards through Heroes Reborn. This is what most fans and a lot of writers do anyway, as if that era never happened.

Fridge Horror
  • In a memorable Iron Man storyline, Tony's armor is infected with Ultron-tech and essentially becomes his abusive boyfriend: jealous, controlling, and obsessive. It even sacrifices itself to save his life. Thing is, Ultron-tech is derived from Ultron, a killer robot with a personality based on the brain waves of its creator, scientist Henry Pym (who happens to be Tony Stark's teammate on the Avengers). Taking this to the inevitable, horrifying conclusion, does this mean Hank Pym is secretly, obsessively in love with Tony Stark?
    • Ultron's personality is BASED on Hank Pym's brainwaves, and does not contain Hank's memories. Without those memories, there is no way to draw the conclusion that Hank is in love with Tony. However, Hank IS jealous, abusive, and generally obsessive, as well as petty. But similar to Hank, when the chips are down and it's truly important, the Ultron-Iron suit gave its life to save Tony, as Hank has demonstrated with Wasp in the past. In reality, this makes the Ultron-tech fridge horror, because of the fact that any machine could become a possessive and abusive figure in a person's life... imagine your computer, that holds ALL your porn and ALL your secrets. You haven't been paying enough attention to it, and now it's jealous. Guess what it'll do?

Fridge Logic
  • In "The Five Nightmares", Stark details what he considers the five worst things that could happen to him.
    • #1: Alcoholic Relapse. Self-explanatory.
    • #2: Cheap Iron Man Technology. That his technology becomes easily and affordably replicable. That is, that there is ever more than two powered armor suits of his design. This is why he never sells any of it.
    • #3: Outsourced Iron Man Technology. That someone besides him or Rhodes starts using it. He deliberately makes it as complicated as possible to deter this.
    • #4: Disposable Iron Man Technology. Cheap and replaceable like a cell phone. Unremarkable in every way. Common. Banal. It breaks? Toss it. He tries to justify it with general security paranoia, but he acknowledges that his monopolization of the technology makes him feel special.
    • #5: Obsolete Iron Man Technology. This is the one he hates the most. That the person who makes Iron Man technology cheap, easy to use, and disposable wouldn't be him. Really kind of inevitable because he just stated that he refuses to do those things.
      • The first is understandable, as he knows from repeated experience that one drink will send him into a downward spiral that won't stop until he's unconscious in a trash heap. The following four mean that he believes that Reed Richards SHOULD be useless and that laws should be passed to enforce that. In short, he is opposed to every aspect of modern science - that technology should improve at all. Why is he considered a good guy, again?
      • Because Tony knows Technology will advance regardless. What he's worried about is technology advancing faster than he can stay ahead of it. He's also afraid of the social effects of technology. For example, compare the social changes created by internet or smart phones vs the fear and aniety surrounding nuclear power. Never mind the corrosive effects of greed and corruption. Tony isn't so much worried about losing his edge as he is worried about possible futures where at minimum there's a new another arms race.
      • The logic comes from the latter four fears being about the potential for the rapid growth of technology in general, and specifically his own inventions, outpacing mankind's wisdom to use it. It can be argued he's a hero at least in part because he has these fears, rather than releasing each new technological marvel on the open market as soon as he comes up with them. The upcoming Superior Iron Man is set to explore what happens when he no longer has that moral constraint.

Film Examples

See Iron Man Films

Anime examples:

  • Why Japan for the first mass-production Arc Reactor? They have cause to be concerned about meeting their power needs, given recent events.

Cartoon Examples

  • Fridge Horror - Remember how in the Grand Finale, Mandarin created an anti-technology fog that effectively shut down New York City and Hong Kong, including life support (Tony and M.O.D.O.K.), air traffic (Force Work's jet, a helicopter, and the jetboots for the armors), the armors, and that we saw looting and a fire started (started from the helicopter crash)? Keeping this in mind, that means other planes that was in the air crashed, people are in hospitals on life support and/or in dire need of medical care probably died, and emergency services were likely impeded. The Mandarin was probably responsible for the deaths of hundreds—if not thousands—of people.
    • Hundreds, if not thousands? Try hundreds OF thousands, if not millions. Think about all of those with pacemakers, electronic respirators at home and in hospitals, etc, etc....