Fridge / Breaking Bad

Fridge Brilliance
  • After Krazy-8 walks off from Jesse's house, Jesse takes the bike lock off his mo-ped to keep Krazy-8 from escaping again. In Season 2 after he's been evicted by his parents his mo-ped gets stolen outside of a gas station.
  • In the intervention scene in "Gray Matter," Hank tries to give Walt a pep talk using poker as an analogy. Where does Skyler later claim their sudden influx of cash has come from? Walt's gambling addiction. The moment could even serve as a retrospective, in-universe explanation for what 'inspired' Walt in the first place (ignoring the fact of where the money really comes from).
  • The tag of the final season is Remember My Name. In the penultimate episode, Walt is about to surrender when he sees on TV Elliot and Gretchen dismissing Walt's contribution to Gray Matter and Heisenberg's reputation as a drug kingpin. Their insult to Walt's name kicks off the series finale.
    • It also generally applies since the final season sees the destruction of Heisenberg and his empire. With nothing to show for it, all that's left would be the legend and his name. The tag is talking directly to us, the viewers.
    • It also again invokes the poem Ozymandias, where a guy's legacy crumbles and the only thing that's left of him is the name.
  • When Mike tells Walt that paying off the guys in prison is "what you do", Walt dismisses it as Mike wasting money on an unnecessary personal code, and opts to have them all killed instead. Except, in a later episode, Hank is pretty easily able to flip Huell by convincing him that Walt wants him dead as a "loose end". This actually echoes several real life cases where crime bosses killed too easily and their remaining subordinates sought police protection out of fear that they'd be next. In other words, Mike's code is the intelligent, reasonable way of dealing with the world of drug-dealing. Mike knew what he was doing, and Walt just didn't have a clue. It's a subtle but key example of how Walt brought about his own downfall by trusting his own judgement above everyone else's, even though he really doesn't get how the criminal world works.
    • This also applies to the series finale: Why, despite everything, is Walt able to get Badger and Skinny Pete to help him bluff the Schwartzes? Because in season 2, when Badger got stung by the cops, Walt made a point of getting Badger released from jail rather than have him killed. Badger is grateful enough to Walt to continue to trust him, and naturally enough, Skinny Pete, as a friend of Badger's, trusts Walt as well.
  • Teddy bear with a face that is half burnt off after an explosion? Gus Fring, anyone?
    • It was missing an eye...Walt carries around said eye...Gus was missing an eye...Gus's actions continue to affect Walt posthumously...Holy crap
  • In the episode "Blood Money", Badger's monologue about his Star Trek fan fiction may seem to be a Big Lipped Alligator Moment, except for the fact his story hinges on the Enterprise' transporter system. In the Star Trek universe, a key component of the transporter is the "Heisenberg compensator", the function of which is to compensate for Werner Heisenberg's uncertainty principle. The uncertainty principle is, symbolically, a defining feature of Walter White.
  • Why is Walt annoyed by the cash register sound effect used by Walter Jr.'s donation website? Maybe it's not because the sound is disturbing Holly, but because it's the exact same sound effect used for Hector Salamanca's bell, and Walt sees it as a painful reminder of his and Jesse's time in Tuco's captivity.
  • In "Half Measures" Mike tells Walt that back when he was a cop, he took a serial wife-beater out to the country to scare him straight by threatening to kill him. The man later killed his wife, leading Mike to promise himself he would never use a 'half measure' (scaring him) rather than a 'full measure' (killing him) again. Except, he and other characters later on end up losing everything because they take a half-measure, Mike included:
    • Come Season 5, Mike decides against killing Walt because Jesse begs him not to. This ultimately plants the seeds that cause Mike's death.
    • In "Crawl Space," Gus takes Walt out to the desert and threatens him instead of killing him due to Jesse's intervention. This plants the seeds for Gus's death.
    • This motif debatably carries over to Walter in the second half of season 5 twice:
      • Saul presents the option for Walter to kill Hank but Walter scoffs at this because he can't bring himself to kill a family member; instead electing to make the tape which stalls Hank temporarily but doesn't solve his problem.
      • Multiple characters urge Walter to kill Jesse but instead, he elects to simply try and talk to him. Dragging his feet on killing Jesse arguably starts Walter's demise more than anything else. Ironically, it's the few times late in the series where Walter actually tries to be a decent person again that lead to his destruction.
      • In a way, one could say that just as the 'Heisenberg' persona was the downfall of Walter White (separating him from his life/loved ones), it's the kinder 'Walter White' persona which is the downfall of Heisenberg (not taking action against Hank and Jesse).
    • There is also a very clear inconsistency in this theme however. Mike takes an obvious 'half-measure', if not two, with regard to Lydia Rodarte-Quayle, but Lydia's continued presence has no real negative consequences for Mike or anyone else. The only possible exception is saying that the Mike's men in prison would've been better off but, had the prison hit not happened, things would've just ended badly for Jesse, Walter, and possibly even Mike anyway. So it's kinda six-in-one and half-a-dozen in the other.
    • Hank's half measure is that instead of taking his suspicions/evidence directly to SAC Ramey, he waits until he knows he can personally fully pin Walter. The second he does, he ends up getting killed by the Aryan Brotherhood.
  • The season two final has a massive Genius Bonus: the midair collision is similar to a real-life incident in 1986, when an Aeromexico jet and a private plane flew into each other over Los Angeles. The air traffic controller in the incident: his name was Walter White!.
  • In "Rabid Dog," Jesse momentarily examines a book called Dutch on a bookshelf in Hank's house. In gambling, a "Dutch book" is a term for a wager that's guaranteed to yield a profit no matter what the outcome is — in other words, it describes Hank's intended gambit with Jesse. As long as Jesse approaches Walt, it doesn't matter what happens. Either way, Hank will get new evidence against Walt.
  • What does Walt build to use against the Neo-Nazis in the finale? A robot, which is a reference to a previous line.
  • In the very first scene of the pilot, Walt's video message to his family includes the line "I only had you in my heart". Both meanings of that phrase: that Walt cooks meth to provide for his family, and Walt's Lack of Empathy to people outside his family are significant parts of Walt's character.
  • Walt takes his alias, "Heisenberg", from the famed German physicist Werner Heisenberg, who became infamous late in his career for working to help the Nazis develop nuclear weapons during World War II. In season 5B, Walt ends up working with a gang of neo-Nazis.
  • Perhaps borders on Fridge Horror, but the show was essentially about turning Mr. Chips into Scarface. As Walt's actions gradually get worse and worse, he keeps giving rationales for said actions. Since Walt started as an Escapist Character, the audience probably is too. However, at one point in the series, Walt will cross a line that you would be unwilling to cross. Since the viewer is (presumably) as normal as Walt would be in the beginning, we get to see how far we'd be willing to go to break bad, when we finally see him do an action we would be unwilling to do.
  • In "Cancer Man," Walt tells the story of how he met Skyler. She was a hostess at a restaurant he frequented, and he noticed her filling out crossword puzzles in her downtime. Seeing an opportunity to set up a Meet Cute for the two of them, he started doing the puzzles himself and asking her for help. On the surface, this seems sweet, but look more closely. He used his intelligence and power of observation to identify something about her, then he used that information to attract her with manipulation and lies. She is a smart woman, but she never saw it coming because he was using his innocuous appearance to his advantage. His intentions were sinister, but he carried himself in an unassuming way, so she didn't suspect anything. It's very telling about his character very early on.
  • The bullet that kills Walt hits him in his right lung. Walt was living with terminal lung cancer, and that means that in a way, the organ that he was told would kill him in due time ultimately did kill him.
  • When Gus threatens Walt in "Crawl Space", why does he not threaten to kill Walt, but rather, threatens his family? It's simple, because he knows Walt's cancer is coming back. How do we know this? Not only is it the fact that Walt's "cancer cough" has returned, but because Gus has the super-detailed medical information of his most important employees (seeing how the impromptu medical clinic earlier in the same episode had the correct blood types on hand for everyone who got wounded during the escape from the cartels' compound). Gus knows Walter is a dead man and threatening to kill him would accomplish nothing, so threatening his family, in Gus's mind, is the only way to go.
  • Why did Victor try to cook meth by himself, only to get killed by Gus? Because Victor knows he's partially responsible for letting Gale get killed. He and Mike had unknowingly allowed Walt to find out where Gale lived, while Walt hid Jesse under their noses and carried out another act against Gus. Victor had to have known that Gus was probably going to kill him as a penalty for failing to protect Gale and for being seen by witnesses. Also, Victor probably knew that someone in his position is pretty easily replaceable. That would at least explain why Victor decided to cook that batch of meth: he's making a desperate effort to prove to Gus that he was more valuable than Walt, and that he could take Walt's place and Gus would instead change his mind and kill Walt. Sadly, it just didn't work.
  • When Gus is questioned in "Hermanos," it's clear that he anticipated his prints being in Gale's house. But you wonder, where did Hank get the comparison prints from? But then you realize, Gus was a Chilean immigrant. Even though Hank does admit that immigrant background checks weren't as thorough prior to 9/11, even in the 1980s when Gus did enter the United States, all green card and naturalization applicants were fingerprinted when going through an FBI background check and these prints remain on file permanently. So Gus clearly knew his fingerprints were already on file. Meaning that Hank's whole cup ruse was practically unnecessary. Maybe Hank just didn't think of that or he did it (and it happened offscreen), since he was basically conducting his own investigation and didn't want to send in an official request for the prints.
  • Walt's windshield: notice in "Caballo Sin Nombre" that in every shot before the cop pulls Walt over, the windshield appears to be perfectly intact with no Wayfarer 515 damage. It's not until the police officer points out the damage to Walt that the damage actually appears. Seems like a continuity error, or, alternately: the damage was always there, but Walt was so off in his own little world that he didn't notice it until the cop pointed it out to him. The windshield looking intact was showing it as Walt would've imagined it.
  • Hank realizing Walt is Heisenberg is an interesting one: While it definitely seems like oversight for Walt to leave incriminating evidence like a copy of Leaves of Grass from Gale Boetticher lying in plain sight where anyone could pick it up, and that's all it takes for Hank to put two and two together, that actually happens more often than not. In investigations of this nature, it often only takes just a tiny clue or slip-up to send the police in the right direction and ultimately crack the case open. It was just the tiniest of mistakes by Walt. By itself, it wasn't really anything and Walt might have been able to explain it away, but it wouldn't matter because the damage was already done. Up to that point, for Hank, the idea of Walt being Heisenberg was about as foreign as Marie being Heisenberg. It was just utterly absent from Hank's mind even though there were plenty of other clues right in front of his face. That slip-up with the copy of Leaves of Grass implanted the idea in Hank's mind that maybe it was Walt all along, and all Hank had to do was think about it: "Hmm, Walt is a brilliant chemist. Yet no one can find him whenever other important things are going on [like Tuco's death or Gus's death]. And he insisted on staying at his home in the wake of Fring's threat on my life rather than come with the rest of his family to my home for protection, meaning for a couple days he was completely by himself, during which Fring was killed. And oh my god, that lame-ass story of his and Skyler's about counting cards for how he suddenly was able to afford to purchase the car wash he used to work at, a story that in my opinion seems to be a bit too good to be true? And his connections to Jesse Pinkman, a man who I've personally investigated on several occasions for meth manufacturing/distribution? FUCK!"
  • When Gus, annoyed with the Cousins' intimidation tactics, tells them to meet him at sunset in the desert, notice that even though they act together and kill together, the two Cousins seem to have subtly different personalities. Marco looks calm and collected, while Leonel looks aggressive and paranoid. Once you see the flashback of Hector nearly drowning Marco, you can understand why Leonel (as the one who had to hit Hector repeatedly to get him to let Marco go) is acting like that.
  • Saul's freakout in "Full Measures" when Mike threatens to break his legs to get information on Jesse's wherabouts seems kinda out-of-character. But after viewing the scene in Better Call Saul where Jimmy/Saul has to watch as Tuco breaks two skateboarders' legs because they insulted his grandmother, it occurred to me that the trauma of that day clearly hasn't worn off on Jimmy.
  • For Walt's 51st birthday, Jesse gets him a Tag Heuer Monaco watch. The watch is forever linked to and made famous by Steve McQueen in the movie Le Mans. Steve McQueen died in 1980 of a rare, inoperable lung cancer.
  • It's not visible on the surface, but when you think about Hank's home-brewery, you realize that he and Walt have subtle similarities. Walt felt like a failure in his life and career, and made meth to make up for it and compensate. Hank also felt like somewhat of an underachiever at the DEA, as he wanted to become an ASAC (before deciding that field work was his talent), and brewed beer.
  • Skyler slept with Ted, then helped him cook his books. If you think about it, Skyler helping Ted with illegal activity may have gone some way to helping her understand what Walt did and why, and factored into her aiding Walt's operation with the purchase of the car wash. That said, Ted cooked his books and Walt cooked his meth - there's a big difference (even though both are crimes).
  • Knowing the events of Better Call Saul makes clear that even though Jimmy has become Saul thoroughly, parts of Jimmy's human side still shine, like:
    • Scenes where Saul is appalled by Walt's poisoning of Brock
    • The scene where he screams to Jesse: "I never would have agreed to it if I knew Walt was going to poison him! You've gotta believe me, Jesse! I didn't want any of THIS!"
    • His scene in "Granite State" and the way he tries to give Walt proper legal advice for a change
    • The scene where he's racking his head before Ted arrives in his office, saying: "This is a bad idea...this is a bad idea...this is a bad idea..." as if he knows Ted is probably on the same league of idiocracy as the Kettlemans or Daniel Warmold
    • The scene where he went out of his way to tell Jesse that he should go see Andrea and Brock in Season 4
    • The scene where Walt tells Saul: "I can't be the bad guy anymore" in Season 3 and Saul sits in his car afterword, looking bothered.

  • During the attempted truck hijack in "Bullet Points", Mike's actions while crouched in the back of the truck - or the way he draws his pistol the moment the truck stops completely - make it clear he seems to know the hijackers' M.O. Seems to make more sense after the Better Call Saul episode "Nailed" reveals that Mike knew their methods....because he himself once hijacked an ice cream truck smuggling Hector Salamanca's drug money.
  • Before the "Dead Freight" heist, Mike remarks that there are two types of heists: perfect ones, and ones that leave a witness behind. Now, this has meaning in Breaking Bad because Todd kills Drew Sharp for stumbling upon the train heist. But maybe Mike is drawing from experience because in Better Call Saul, he hijacked one of Hector Salamanca's trucks and stole drug money from it, but he didn't kill the driver. Subsequently, when a Good Samaritan came along afterwards, he cut the driver loose and the driver called Hector in. Hector then took the Samaritan out into the desert and shot him point-blank in the head.
  • The attacks on Gus's refrigerator trucks in season 4 had left me wondering, "How come police reports weren't filed on either incident?", considering that both incidents ended in a shot up refrigerator truck on the roadside with a dead driver (and two guards armed with assault rifles in the second robbery). But then I watched the Better Call Saul episode where Mike attacked one of Hector's trucks. When Mike is confronted by Nacho after the fact, Mike asks why the robbery wasn't in the papers, and Nacho mentions that Hector's crew cleaned up the scene and removed the truck, making it look like nothing happened. Hector's operation may be small fry compared to Gus's operation, but it led me to think that Gus might have a similar service on hand to make sure they don't end up with newspaper articles headlined "Los Pollos Hermanos Refrigerator Truck Attacked", "Police Seek Suspects in Los Pollos Hermanos Truck Ambush", "Three Killed in Los Pollos Hermanos Truck Robbery," and so on.
  • Walt's memetic "I AM the one who knocks!" line seems kinda hammy. It seems up there with Tony Montana's "Say hello to my little friend" in Scarface (1983). Walt idolizes Scarface, and even shows it to Walt Jr. in a season 5A episode, saying "Look how cool this is!" Walt intentionally imitated the bravado from a movie, regardless of its real world appearance. It's symptomatic of a much larger truth: Walt sees his life like a movie, he sees himself like the big boss, despite the realities crashing in around him.
  • Someone once pointed out that for a hardened drug kingpin, Walt begs for his life and pleads a lot. Nearly pissing his pants many times, he's as scared worse than someone like Jesse half the time. But that element of Walt makes more sense when you consider he's not a hardened drug kingpin. As mentioned with the Scarface example above, Walt constantly acts like he got his ideals from TV shows and movies. The fact that he acts this way when trapped in a corner may have been intentional to drive home a simple point: Walt was never really meant to be a drug dealer, much less a kingpin. He just never "got it" and that's why everything was constantly falling apart for him. In fact, for all his faults in the emotional department, Jesse actually understood what their role was in the big picture. It was Jesse who warned against Tuco, Jesse who was against expanding into new territory, Jesse who was against meeting in the middle of nowhere, Jesse who was against continuing the operation after being offered a buyout, etc.
    • In fact, it's hard to be a successful, hardened "bad guy" when you're a family man on the side. Too much collateral, as Tuco put it. Just compare Walt to the other "successful" bad guys in both this show and Better Call Saul. Closest thing to a family (that we see) might be Mike's daughter-in-law and granddaughter, and Gus's kids (assuming they even are real). And Better Call Saul also showed how having family complicates things - as evident from the scene where the Cousins threaten Mike by standing on a rooftop overlooking the swimming pool and doing a gun gesture at Kaylee. Walt only survived as long as he did by outsmarting people on the technical/mechanical side of things and getting lucky, not because he actually understood the drug game.

Fridge Brilliance - Metastasis
  • Walter Blanco is compared to William Blake instead of Walt Whitman. Considering the violence in Blake's works, it is very appropriate.

Fridge Horror
  • Remember how Wendy was around Once a Season? The last episode she was in was when she was part of Jesse's attempt to kill the two drug dealers who'd corrupted Andrea's brother. At the end of the episode, they've killed said little brother, and Wendy's not been seen since, either. She's probably been killed, or overdosed.
  • Can you imagine how much it must've destroyed Walt seeing the aftermath of the airplane crash and realizing through the TV coverage that he had inadvertently caused 150+ deaths by letting Jane die? Even worse, when he eventually pieces together that he met Donald Margolis at a bar right before he went and basically killed his daughter.
  • Early on in Season 5, Lydia says that she can't die because she has a little girl to take care of, and if she does die or goes missing, her daughter will end up in foster care, which she knows will be horrible for her. In the series finale, Walt poisons Lydia with the ricin he hid in the cigarette, meaning she only has a few more days to live, dooming Lydia's daughter to the fate she described.
    • Though Lydia does at least get her wish in that she won't disappear, and her daughter won't think she abandoned her. The nature of the poison at least gives her time to arrange things.
  • Jesse does not seem to be in the best mental state, to put it mildly, when he escapes in the finale. Will he be able to recover? If so, how will he support himself? Has he gone too far into the drug world and thus had his reputation and chances for another life utterly destroyed?
    • Additionally, isn't he in trouble with the DEA now? Any deal he might have had presumably died with Hank, and he's unlikely to be able to make a new one with Heisenberg dead and his empire in shambles; Jesse simply doesn't have anything of value to offer. Not to mention the fact that he's totally broke, and his lawyer just fell off the face of the earth.
      • There's a theory on Headscratchers that it would actually look embarrassing for the cops to prosecute Jesse after he spent the better portion of a year in a Neo-Nazi dungeon, especially if he said he got coerced into working with Hank and Gomez. He might be able to get a settlement and possibly even therapy, considering that if word gets out that Jesse was basically enslaved by Jack Welker and his gang and then escaped after killing one of his captors, the media would almost certainly portray him as a victim. Also, Badger and Skinny Pete are still alive and they'd probably be willing to help Jesse.

  • What happened to Brock? Is he living with another family relative we don't know about after Andrea was killed? Is he in foster care? Did Jesse pick him up and adopt him after he escaped from Jack and his goons? Or did Jack's neo-nazis kill him anyway and not inform Jesse about it so he could still cook for them under the assumption that Brock was still alive?
    • Not to mention how could he have been killed in that case, considering he's a hispanic boy sorrounded by Neo-Nazis and the problems that his death would imply an acid bath isn't far from possible, neither throwing him in while still alive.
    • There is his grandmother who he and Andrea are living with when they are introduced.
    • And in the last episode, Gretchen makes a seemingly throwaway remark about her maid, Juana, being upset on account of her daughter. Juana could possibly be the mother of Andrea.
    • They probably didn't kill Brock. They've already killed Andrea. Since Jesse is already cooking under the assumption that Brock is alive, what advantage would the Neo-Nazis gain by killing Brock at a later date? And if Brock had something to tell the police, he would have likely already told them before the "later date" arrived (he may be young, but he'll remember Todd's face very clearly from when he visited to shoot Andrea). He would also be harder to get at by that point. Potentially, they would have had to kill other people to get at Brock. Not to mention that killing Brock would introduce a chance that Jesse finds out about it somehow. What if a newspaper page could blew into his cage or perhaps a radio playing within earshot of Jesse's cage broadcasts news of the murder? There's no risk of Jesse discovering the murder if there is no murder. Killing Brock would just create unnecessary risk for Jack and his gang.

  • Ken Wins's car burns up next to a gas station in Season 1. Only Rule of Funny keeps the entire station from going up.
  • In season 2's "Peekaboo" episode, we run across some truly repugnant meth-addicted parents when Jesse tries to get back the money and drugs they stole from his dealer. Jesse bonds with their kid a bit and chastises the mother for being so sucky. This episode is one of the first to show that Jesse cares about kids and doesn't like to see them hurt. However, he and his partner are putting out the purest meth their state has ever seen. These parents were addicts before Blue Sky, but how many families are going to end up similar to this thanks to Jesse and Walt's product?
  • The whole series has disturbing implications about the kind of terrible things normal (or seemingly normal) people are capable of under the right circumstances.
  • What makes the show so chilling is how damaging lies and deceit can really be. The consequences for Walt lying gradually worsen as the series progresses, and by the fifth season, the White family is completely shattered. Nothing about it is genuine.
  • When we last saw Ted, he was in the hospital with a broken neck or spine. There's a possibility that he'll end up as a quadriplegic.
    • Also consider the fact that his head appears to have been shaved. That's because they'd have to do so to get into his brain to stop the swelling.
  • What happened to the sweet old lady whose handicap van got commandeered by the Cousins? Although we never see it, there seems to be a strong implication that they killed her for it.
  • Gus's death has some chilling undertones to it. Like, Walt is lucky the bomb only killed Gus, Hector and Tyrus. 'Cause watching the explosion, the force of the blast blew down the door and threw it into the hallway. If a caregiver was wheeling a resident down the hall in front of Hector's door at the time of explosion. Or maybe a caregiver came to Hector's door to check on him at the time of the explosion. Anyone in that vicinity would have had a bad day.
  • There had to be a lot of fallout from Gus's death that the show never dwelled on. With the death of Gus, and the exposure of his drug empire, Madrigal is going to be in a lot of hot water. This is not tax evasion or liability for a faulty product, but narcotics production and trafficking on an industrial scale. In fact, Madrigal is lucky that the United States government or EU didn't have them dissolved.
    • In fact, this could factor into what little we see of Peter Schuler. It's obvious that Schuler and Gus knew each other personally, as evidenced by the photo shown of the two together on a game fishing trip. His role seems to possibly have been to launder Gus's meth money through Los Pollos Hermanos, lending real legitimacy to LPH as a Madrigal corporate franchise (which is not too far-fetched as there are plenty of actual so-called "local" food franchises that are owned by conglomerates). By committing suicide, Schuler may not have just been avoiding a prison sentence, but he may also have done so to protect Madrigal as a whole from prosecution, implicating only himself in the operation by not throwing anyone else from Madrigal under the bus in a plea deal.
  • The way Saul acts in "Granite State", it's clear that his real personality as Jimmy McGill is coming back. It's as if all of Saul's goods have been stripped away: his job, his flashy clothes and car and even his name—fake though it is—and without them, he is just another working slob, doomed to the kind of life he had always avoided.
  • The death of Drew Sharp after the train heist was shocking enough. But it had to have been worse for Mike. That's because he probably still remembers the fallout from his attack on Hector's ice cream/money smuggling truck from Better Call Saul: an innocent Samaritan got killed by Hector for stumbling upon the tied-up truck driver. Mike hasn't forgotten that. And Sharp probably reminded him of that Samaritan - someone in the wrong place at the wrong time.
  • Jesse and Skinny Pete's reactions to Combo's death really speak volumes about both men's vastly different backgrounds, and about the subtle psychological effects of a life of crime. Jesse, the relatively privileged White kid who grew up in suburbia, is so devastated by his death that he refuses to leave the house for days, and can't even bring himself to attend Combo's funeral. But when the veteran drug dealer Skinny Pete calls Jesse after the funeral, he excitedly raves about it like it was just another party, even gushing about the impressively large casket that Combo's family paid for. It's a small but telling look at the mindset of a professional drug dealer. People like Combo and Skinny Pete know damn well that their careers come with a low life expectancy, and they live with the possibility of death every day; for many of them, a lavish funeral is the closest thing that they'll ever get to a retirement party.

Fridge Logic
  • Why did Saul vanish with the full identity change at the end of the series? Sure, he was Walt and Jesse's lawyer, but there doesn't seem to be any evidence tying him to criminal activity. Gus and associates are dead, and Jack's gang has no reason to hold a grudge against him. Why wouldn't he just stick with his law practice?
    • Walter White becomes really infamous, which means lots of attention on his lawyer at a federal level. In his case, he would probably be caught on something and they'd throw the book at him hard, even if just a technicality. It's possible that later seasons of Better Call Saul will cover his return, if he makes one.
      • He's looking at charges of criminal conspiracy and money laundering since he knowingly handled Walt's drug money. Under RICO statutes he could also be charged with anything that he had Huell and Kuby carry out.
      • And as far as he's concerned, even for that moment while he was getting an identity change, he's not Saul anymore. He's just Jimmy.
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