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Fridge: A Christmas Carol

Fridge Brilliance:

  • The Ghost of the Past is flickering, translucent, and indistinct because Scrooge is trying to forget his past, to make it not exist. The bright halo that surrounds it reminds one that the past can never be completely forgotten.
    • The harder he tried to snuff out the Ghost's light, the brighter it gets until it's blinding. Scrooge's refusal to accept his past blinds him to the reality of his present life.
  • To say nothing of the Ghost of Christmas Future being a dark, hooded figure representing the future's uncertainty and his resemblence to the Grim Reaper, which shows the future we must all eventually face: death.
  • It confused this troper for years that with the present unaltered, Scrooge would have been dead by next Christmas, but the ending implies that he lived for many more years. Then I learn that having a loser, more relaxed lease on life, as reformed Scrooge did, can lead to lower blood-pressure, being less likely to suffer from strokes and heart attacks, and overall improved health. Going further, the course of his death in the unaltered timeline was not his age as this troper had grown up thinking, it could have been anything from his high blood-pressure to the stress on his heart. Marley really did give Scrooge a second chance; by prolonging his life to give him more time to repent.
  • There is a layer of subtle terror in Zemeckis' depiction of the Ghost of Christmas Future as an incorporeal shadow. With this spirit Scrooge has no companion to serve as a guide or confidant to share his thoughts. At the beginning when Scrooge talked to the charity men, he said he wished to be left alone, and now he truly is alone.
  • In the 2009 Disney adaptation Scrooge takes the pennies off Jacob Marley's eyes. The pennies used as fare to get to the other side to face judgement.
  • The ghosts (depending on the adaptation) often bear some semblance to either Ebenezer himself, or to the aspect of Scrooge's life they represent: the candle/glowing figure of the past is indistinct yet bright, because he does not wish to remember the past yet cannot forget it; the large and boisterous ghost of the present often either somewhat looks like a "jolly fat" version of Scrooge or otherwise depicts what a man with his life could be doing if he had the Christmas spirit; so why does the ghost of the future not just look "shadowy and indistinct" but rather explicitly like the Grim Reaper? Well, when you're Scrooge's age, especially in that time frame, there's really only one thing you can expect in the future...
  • In the 2009 version, we have two kids named Ignorance and Want. Ignorance seems to spend his life in and out of jail, while Want, a girl, possibly goes down another path of ill-repute. The Brilliance comes when Scrooge is dealing with the Ghost of Christmas Yet To Come, and sees the two people picking through his belongings once he's dead. They look a lot like Ignorance and Want.
    • Want also gets put in a straitjacket, suggesting a mental asylum. Some venereal diseases—syphilis, particularly—have that effect on the brain and, by extension, the mind.

Fridge Logic

  • Why was Scrooge surprised to find out that he would die alone and hated? He seemed aware of how poorly people thought of him.
    • Why was Scrooge, of all people, given this special chance for redemption? Specially if, as Marley claimed, Scrooge's chains (sins) were heavier than his.
    • Of course, knowing something and seeing it for yourself are two vastly different things. Things we know have relatively mild impact on us, but things we witness have much greater impact. It's pretty obvious that Scrooge, much like most of us today, never thought that he would see his own dead body buried in his own grave, and probably without so much as a coffin to boot. It was being forced to confront the full reality of the situation that shook him up so bad.
    • I confess I've never read the original story myself, so it is possible I could be thinking of something else, but isn't there a line in the beginning explicitly stating that Scrooge considered himself a pillar of the community? Bit of a kick in the teeth to have one's self image shattered like that, really.
    • No, there's no line like that, Scrooge has no illusions about what people think of him, he just didnt care in life, but that doesnt mean he expected people to joke and laugh about his death and looting his corpse. He might have been less shocked if there was simple grim indifference to his passing. Also, keep in mind that the story's point is that Scrooge wasnt evil or uncaring by nature, he was originally a good man who had been worn down and twisted by a hard life and his own greed. In some dark corner of his soul, Scrooge didnt really want to be remembered like that.

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