troperville

tools

toys


main index

Narrative

Genre

Media

Topical Tropes

Other Categories

TV Tropes Org
random
Franchise: The Witches of Eastwick

The Witches of Eastwick is a novel by John Updike that was adapted into a film starring Jack Nicholson and later a musical. It also inspired the television series Eastwick and a sequel novel, The Widows of Eastwick.

Sukie, Jane, and Alexandra, three bored, middle-aged and single housewives living in the New England town of Eastwick, have the ability to manifest whatever they desire by thinking about it in concert. One night, while having a get-together, the three discuss their ideas of the perfect man.

The next day, a mysterious stranger by the name Darryl Van Horne moves into the town's historic Lennox mansion. One by one, he manages to seduce each of the three women, and helps them to realize the full extent of their powers. The four indulge in a hedonistic sexual relationship, as the town busybodies gossip about the immorality of it all. After the pillar of the community, Felicia Alden, is mysteriously murdered by her Henpecked Husband Clyde, the witches begin to realize that the new man in town may be up to no good...

Not to be confused with Witches Of East End

The film contains examples of:

  • Adaptational Attractiveness: In the novel only Sukie was beautiful; Alexandra and Jane were average-looking middle-aged women.
  • Adaptational Heroism: The witches were far more amoral in the novel where, for example, they are largely indifferent to the murder of Felicia at the hands of her husband, Jane even claiming she brought it on herself with her self righteous hectoring.
  • Babies Ever After: At the end of the film each witch has a baby boy whose hair color matches hers.
  • Blonde, Brunette, Redhead: The eponymous witches, played by Michelle Pfeiffer (blonde), Cher (brunette) and Susan Sarandon (redhead).
  • The Cassandra: Felicia Alden was the only hostile to Van Horne. Everyone thought she was going crazy.
  • God Is Inept: Daryl Van Horne's rant:
    Daryl: Do you think God knew what He was doing when He created woman? Huh? No shit. I really wanna know. Or do you think it was another one of His minor mistakes like tidal waves, earthquakes, floods? You think women are like that? S'matter? You don't think God makes mistakes? Of course He does. We all make mistakes. Of course, when we make mistakes they call it evil. When God makes mistakes, they call it "nature". So whaddya think? Women... a mistake, or did he do it to us on purpose?
  • Gossipy Hens: They do a lot of clucking about all the cavorting that goes on at Darryl's mansion.
  • The Hedonist: Daryl's goal in a nutshell seems to be for him and the witches to have as much fun together as they can. He's willing to use his powers to torment people if they seem like they're going to get in his way or try to leave him, but as long as nobody's stopping him having fun with the witches he doesn't go out of his way to make people miserable.
  • Horny Devils: Daryl Van Horne. He even identifies himself as such, by name, in a Sarcastic Confession.
  • Hot Witch: The eponymous witches, played by Michelle Pfeiffer, Cher and Susan Sarandon.
  • Insult Backfire: After Alexandra's speech about what a repulsive, sexist pig he is, Darryl simply asks her if she would rather be on the top or bottom when they have sex.
  • Kavorka Man: Played with: Daryl is not particularly physically attractive (and Alex tells him at some length exactly how unattractive he is,) yet he ends up seducing three absolutely gorgeous women with little apparent effort. However, even ignoring the fact that he might have used his supernatural powers to assist him, it is clear even before we actually meet him that he's not using his looks; the old woman in a shop describes him "as not handsome exactly, but - riveting. Yes, that's the word, I was riveted" and Jack Nicholson is charismatic enough to make it work.
  • Lack of Empathy: For all his charm and apparently sincere affection for the witches, his genuine lack of comprehension when Alex tries to tell him why he's wrong to magically torment them and nearly kill Sukie when they try to leave him shows he has a major case of this. He is, however, apparently sincere when Alex points this out and he says "I can learn", so unlike most examples of this trope, he seems willing to try and change. However, the witches have realised by this point how dangerous and unpredictable he is, and decide to banish him.
  • Louis Cypher: Daryl Van Horne. It's not clear whether he is actually Satan (while he has a distinct Lack of Empathy, for the most part his actions make him seem more like an extreme supernatural hedonist rather than someone who's actively malevolent,) but he's clearly some sort of demonic creature.
  • Ominous Multiple Screens: Darryl Van Horne has a bank of TV screens, apparently just for the hell of it.
  • One-Winged Angel: Daryl Van Horn's Giant form at the end of the film.
  • "The Reason You Suck" Speech: Alexandra gets a beauty:
    Alexandra: I think—no, I am positive—that you are the most unattractive man I have ever met in my entire life. You know, in the short time we've been together, you have demonstrated EVERY loathsome characteristic of the male personality and even discovered a few new ones. You are physically repulsive, intellectually retarded, you're morally reprehensible, vulgar, insensitive, selfish, stupid, you have no taste, a lousy sense of humor and you smell. You're not even interesting enough to make me sick.
  • Recycled: The Series: Eastwick
  • Rock Me, Asmodeus!: Jack Nicholson's Devil and Susan Sarandon's repressed music teacher play a literally explosive duet for piano and cello. After this (and after a bout of wild sex), the music teacher finds herself in possession of supernatural musical talent.
  • Sexy Man, Instant Harem: Darkly deconstructed as the man in question is a Yandere Satan.
  • Speak of the Devil: A couple of variations on this trope;
    • Nobody can remember the new stranger's name at first (despite remembering the man himself and remembering thinking that he had a strange name that should be fairly memorable,) until several people suddenly remember and say it at once, causing an accident to befall the woman who later seems to gain some sort of psychic link to his activities.
    • Daryl is first drawn to Eastwick by the three witches thinking about their ideal man together, and unconsciously using their undiscovered magic to summon him. At the end, after they've banished him, they are careful not to think about him whenever they're together because it will bring him back. They don't actually say his name in either case, but it's a similar principle.
  • The Speechless: Fidel
  • Suspiciously Specific Sermon: As Daryl van Horn is being blown toward the church by a gale-force wind, the sermon being spoken inside is as follows:
    Elijah fled to the Mount of God, and behold, the Lord passed by and the great and strong wind rent the mountains and breaked in pieces the rocks before the Lord.
  • Theme Tune Cameo: At one point Jack Nicholson's character is whistling the film's theme.
  • Transformation Sequence: Daryl Van Horne, near the end of the film.
  • Villainous Breakdown: As the three heroines use their voodoo magic against him, he goes from charismatic to loudly proclaiming a hatred of women in a church to becoming an unintelligent, snarling beast, climaxing with his One-Winged Angel.
  • Vomit Indiscretion Shot: Daryl Van Horne inducing vomiting via magic ("Have another cherry") and later suffering as the spell is used on him.
  • Yandere: Daryl's reaction when they get scared and try to leave him is how this trope would normally be played in a woman, with the addition of his supernatural powers.

The novel contains examples of:

  • Asshole Victim: Subverted with Felicia; she deserved something, but Clyde regrets it once he's done it. Though the witches firmly believe that Felicia had it coming.
  • Celebrity Paradox: Darryl shows Chris Gabriel his collection of Batman comic books, mentioning how the white face of the Joker would haunt his dreams. Both Van Horne and the Joker were later played by Jack Nicholson.
  • Does Not Like Men: Sukie is the only one of the trio that doesn't think men are detrimental and is considered immature for it; somewhat justified in that being married means a loss of powers for the witches.
  • Hollywood New England
  • Kick the Dog: At one point, Alex's sleep is disturbed by the barking of a neighbor's puppy. Without really considering her actions, she magically wills it dead.
  • Magical Realism
  • Name's the Same: Two characters are called Homer and Marge. Oh, and they're married.
  • The Antichrist: If Darryl Van Horne is really the Devil (its left ambiguous in the novel) then Jenny Gabriel's baby may have been this. If so, then the witches killing Jenny many have unintentionally prevented the end of days.
  • Token Evil Teammate: Jane, the least sympathetic and the most outwardly malicious of the three witches.
  • Widow Witch: In the novel, the women of the village of Eastwick only gain powers after their husbands/significant others either die or divorce them. It is mentioned that for some reason, it does not matter if the woman leaves or is left, she becomes a Malleus Maleficarum style witch (with bonus third nipple) automatically.
  • Your Cheating Heart: All three women carry on a large amount of affairs with the married men of Eastwick without really caring for the men and openly deriding their wives for being boring or ugly. Alexandra even had an affair with Sukie's ex-husband, proving that no one's off-limits.

The musical contains examples of:

The sequel novel contains examples of:

  • Affably Evil: Chris Gabriel is perfectly willing to sit, chat, and have tea with the women he has threatened to kill.
  • All the Good Men Are Gay: The man Alex meets in Canada.
  • Continuity Porn: The very last page of the previous book makes mention of an unnamed young harbor master with whom Sukie had an affair. In Widows, said harbor master, Tommy Gorton, not only makes an appearance but becomes a minor plot point.
  • Flat Earth Atheist: Jane, who finds the spells and rituals of the ancient Egyptians to be phony and unrealistic. Sukie, for some reason, also starts displaying this attitude during the ritual in the condo.
  • Hurricane of Puns: Jane's dialogue.
  • If It's You, It's Okay: Chris and Sukie, possibly as the result of a spell.
  • Implied Trope: At the end of the vacation in Egypt, and shortly after Jane casually uses lethal magic on a helpless bat (for no other reason than to see if she still could), the two discuss the possibility of Sukie joining them on a future adventure. Alex dismisses it, citing the fact that Sukie still had her husband and probably wouldn't feel comfortable leaving him behind for so long. Jane's response boils down to "we'll see about that." Not long after the trip, Alex receives a letter from Sukie revealing that her husband, despite being in perfect health, has mysteriously dropped dead. She also lets slip that Jane re-entered her life around the same time, "almost as if she saw it coming." Do the math.
  • It's Personal: Chris Gabriel's reason for killing Jane and for trying the same on Alexandra and Sukie is for his sister's death at their hands.
  • I Was Quite a Looker: All of the women at some point, but especially Sukie.
  • Laser-Guided Karma: Jane, who hated Jenny the most and pushed for killing her the hardest, is killed off by her brother.
  • Law of Inverse Fertility: Veronica, the daughter of Alex's former romantic rival Gina Marino, can't get pregnant. By contrast, her father, Gina's husband Joe, would frequently get his wife pregnant with very little effort, and had carried on a relationship with Alex as a contraceptive measure.
  • Maybe Magic, Maybe Mundane: The Witches frequently rely on this trope to avoid their guilt over Jenny Gabriel's death, there being no actual proof that her cancer was caused by magic.
  • Men Are the Expendable Gender: The witches' husbands, as a rule, have to be absent for their magic to work, making them flat characters needing to be killed off.
  • My Beloved Smother: Alexandra to Marcy.
  • Put on a Bus: Darryl, Fidel and Rebecca, since the last book, with no hint as to what became of them.
  • Rich Bitch: Jane
  • Suspiciously Specific Sermon: When Sukie has her first awkward meeting with Tommy Gorton (who has a grotesquely mangled hand resulting from a fishing accident) on Dock Street, a bible in a nearby store window is open to a passage about Jesus healing lepers, not only commenting on Tommy's condition but foreshadowing later events related to it.
  • The Atoner: The purpose of the ritual the women hold.
  • Widow Witch: Taken more literally, as all are elderly and have lost the husbands they conjured for themselves at the end the last book.
  • Windbag Politician: A newspaper editor is giving a long (multipage) speech which is interrupted when the witches inadvertently cause a rainstorm.


Season of StormsFantasy LiteratureThe Witch Watch
The WitchesLiterature of the 1980sA Wizard in Rhyme
Read the Fine PrintImageSource/Live-Action FilmsBlonde, Brunette, Redhead
Wings of DesireFilms of the 1980sYeelen
The Westing GameAdministrivia/Needs a Better DescriptionEvolve

alternative title(s): The Witches Of Eastwick
random
TV Tropes by TV Tropes Foundation, LLC is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.
Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available from thestaff@tvtropes.org.
Privacy Policy
28770
45