Film: The Devil's Double

The Devil's Double is a 2011 film about Uday Hussein, the psychopathic son of Saddam Hussein, and Latif Yahia, his reluctant Body Double. Based loosely on Latif's autobiography.


This film provides examples of:

  • Anything That Moves: Uday, and he is quite proud of this fact. He even openly admits that he loves boning more than his country, his mother, his father, and even God!
  • Artistic License History: A few examples, naturally.
    • The entire premise of Latif Yahia being conscripted as Uday's body double has been called into question by several journalists. Latif adamantly defends his story, but he noticeably changes a few details almost every time he tells it. Hmm...
    • Latif did not participate in the assassination attempt on Uday.
    • See Hope Spot. While Uday did indeed suffer serious genital wounds from the assassination attempt, the doctors managed to repair the damage. Uday then went on a sexual rampage, raping any young girl he could get his hands on just to prove to himself and his increasingly disapproving father that he was still virile.
    • There are two conflicting stories on the weapon Uday used to kill Kamel Hana Gegeo: one has him slicing Gegeo up with an electric carving knife (not a scimitar, as the film shows) before shooting him, and the other describes him using a special stick with a retractable blade.
    • In retaliation for the above murder, Saddam did more than just beat the tar out of Uday: he also had Uday imprisoned and tortured for six weeks by guards from different regiments (so that Uday couldn't get revenge against them later), considered having him executed (Uday's mom talked him out of it), and eventually exiled him to Switzerland until the Swiss got tired of Uday and kicked him out—by then Saddam's temper had cooled, and Uday was allowed to return to Iraq.
  • Ax-Crazy: Uday.
  • Bad Boss: Uday is not particularly pleasant to his guards. This eventually leads to a couple of them assisting in the assassination attempt on him and, in one case, letting one of the assassins escape.
  • Berserk Button: Do not refer to Uday as a faggot. Good Lord. Just don't.
  • Body Double: Latif of course, and various clones of Saddam Hussein.
  • Cluster F-Bomb: Uday replaces almost every other word, no matter his mood.
  • Country Matters: Uday's a fan of saying it a lot and obtaining it by any means necessary.
  • Crossdresser: Who Uday has a crush on.
  • Depraved Bisexual: Uday.
  • Ephebophile: Uday picks up/abducts girls outside schools. Later his goons dump their dead bodies in the desert.
  • Even Bad Men Love Their Mamas: Uday hates an aide of his father who provides him with concubines, saying he doesn't like seeing his mother an emotional wreck because of Saddam's escapades with them. He later guts this aide when he has a psychological breakdown of his own.
  • Everybody Has Standards: With a small number of exceptions, a lot of people around Uday are clearly annoyed and/or disgusted by his behavior. To elaborate, his father shows contempt for him, his brother is embarrassed by his outbursts, his mistreated guards eventually look the other way when an attempt on his life is made, and his body double hates him.
  • Fanservice: Constant! Two Dominic Coopers. Naked Dominic Cooper.
    • Dominic Cooper making everyone undress at the club
    • Ludivine Sagnier being Ludivine Sagnier
  • Faux Affably Evil: Uday seems almost cartoonishly friendly when he's in a good mood...or even when he's threatening to drop that facade.
  • Femme Fatale: Sarrab.
  • Firing in the Air a Lot: Uday.
  • Foregone Conclusion: Uday Hussein was killed by American military forces in 2003. Knowing this, it's obvious going in that Latif's assassination attempt is going to fail.
  • Groin Attack: As punishment for killing one of his father's associates in a rage, the hospitalized Uday is almost castrated with a machete by his father Saddam. He relents when the doctors point out that his son would die from the blood loss.
  • Hookers and Blow: Basically Uday's entire life. Oh, and rape and murder when he's particularely bored.
  • Hope Spot: You know that Uday is going to survive Latif's assassination attempt in the film's ending, and the woman Uday invites into his car even tries to throw off Latif's aim it's subverted when although Uday survives the attempt, Latif successfully fires two bullets into his groin leaving Uday in visible, horrible agony, and according to the "Where Are They Now?" Epilogue credits, crippling him for the remainder of his life and probably leaving him unable to pursue any sexual adventures, consensual or otherwise.
  • I Have No Son: More or less—Saddam tells Uday he wishes he had never been born.
    • Or rather, that he should have been gelded at birth. Karma belatedly fulfills his wish in the ending.
  • Interrupted Suicide. Twice. First Uday takes a lot of sleeping pills then later on, Latif slashes his wrists.
  • Kick the Son of a Bitch: After Uday kills one of his most trusted cronies, Saddam marches into the hospital room Uday is held in (Uday attempted to commit suicide by taking too many sleeping pills), rips the tube out of his mouth, hits him several times to wake him up, squeezes his crotch rather viciously, and is only stopped from castrating him with a knife by the doctor's frantic declaration that such an act might kill Uday.
  • Laser-Guided Karma: While Latif's assassination attempt fails, he does land two shots in Uday's crotch, effectively emasculating him. With all he's done up to that point, it is a welcome sight.
  • Reality Is Unrealistic: The film does a good job depicting Uday's depravity, but it still doesn't even come close to how horrible the real Uday was.
  • Screw the Rules, I Make Them!: Uday.
  • Slasher Smile: Uday has, as Dominic Cooper put it, "extraordinarily strange teeth." Latif wears a false pair when pretending to be Uday.
  • Translation Convention: It's set (obviously) in Iraq, but everyone speaks English.