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Film: After Life
After.Life is a 2009 paranoid thriller film starring Liam Neeson, Christina Ricci, and Justin Long.

Ricci stars as Anna Taylor, a young school teacher whose relationship with her boyfriend Paul Coleman (Long) has grown strained. After fighting with him at dinner over a misunderstanding, she drives off and gets in a car accident. She wakes up in the funeral home of Elliot Deacon (Neeson) who says that she's dead. Apparently he has the gift (or curse, as he later complains) of being able to see and speak with the dead. However, she begins to suspect he may be lying, as does her boyfriend Paul, but time is running out as the funeral is in two days, with Deacon intent on completing his work...

As you might have surmised from all the tagged examples below, huge spoilers ahead!


This film provides examples of the following tropes:

  • Cassandra Truth: No one believes Paul when he claims Anna is really still alive.
  • The Ending Changes Everything: Liam Neeson plays a mortician named Elliot who claims to have the ability to speak to the dead. Throughout the movie, he talks to the main character (who is dead) in hopes of getting her to move on with her life. It turns out in the end that he was lying the whole time and that the main character was always alive. However, there had been foreshadowing for both options on whether he was lying or not, with lots of those moments pointing towards the former. And one large hint that he has been doing it for a long time.
  • Fanservice: Christina Ricci spends a good portion of the film topless while convinced she is dead and being prepared for her own funeral.
  • Foreshadowing: There were clues from the beginning that Anna wasn't actually dead. A white van follows her prior to the accident (the same type which we later see Deacon drive), her injuries did not appear sufficient to be fatal (though granted, that isn't definitive-people can be killed without much visible damage), injecting a corpse is pointless as the blood wouldn't circulate it, the drug he injects her with is said to cause the appearance of death, her breath fogged the mirror up (which Deacon wipes away the first time-why bother if she's actually dead?), she can't leave the room (why does Deacon race back to stop her when he finds she's taken his keys, if she's really just a ghost?) Plus the way Deacon adjusts the thermostat for his morgue (why, if they're popsicles already? It could be invisible, odorless gas to knock Anna out).
  • Karma Houdini: Deacon manages to evade having his true activities revealed even when Paul is right outside the door from where Anna is, alive; having convinced her she's dead and has to "move on", she doesn't reveal herself. He then later goads Paul into speeding off to check whether she's really dead or not (he may have drugged him beforehand), and then kills him in the funeral home, getting rid of one of the only two people who could have revealed him. Jack, the other person who knows, is recruited by Deacon, who fooled him into thinking they both can speak with the dead, and calmly watches as Deacon kills Paul, convinced that he's just a spirit. Deacon gets away clean. He's also done this many times before, judging by his array of corpse photos (Word of God says those with their eyes open were alive, like Anna)...
  • I See Dead People: Deacon appears to possess this ability. However, it turns out he's a Serial Killer who drugs people to make them seem dead, burying them alive, because he feels they've wasted their lives, making them unworthy of life. He also (in the case of Anna at least) then convinces them of the fact, claiming this power as his explanation for why he can speak with them when they're supposedly dead.
  • Truth in Television: "Hydronium Bromide" is fictional, but such effects are possible with drugs.
  • What Happened to the Mouse?: It's never revealed how Deacon chooses his victims, besides Paul, though it seems to be set up in advance, since he appears to have followed Anna in the van before her accident. On that note, it seems hard to insure someone wouldn't be killed before he could get to them, and why bother? What's his need, convincing people they're dead to bury them alive?


After Last SeasonFilms of 2005 - 2009 Agora

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