Double Standard Abuse Female On Male / Professional Wrestling

  • TNA Impact has had a rule imposed on it by Spike TV that they can never, ever show men using violence against women. The reverse of this is not true, and, as TNA discovered when they ran a storyline where Cody Deaner stole the women's championship belt and claimed to be the champion, this applies even within the confines of a sanctioned wrestling match. Therefore, every single match where a woman was trying to reclaim the belt had the woman absolutely beat the crap out of Deaner for 3-4 minutes, with Deaner getting absolutely no offense whatsoever in, only for him to either win in the end with a fluke roll up, or lose and sneak away with the belt anyway. The aftereffects of this killed his TNA career.
  • Much like the above, the WWE Video Games have almost the same standard. A man can't hit a woman at all, whether it be by accident, self-defense, or in a sanctioned match without being disqualified. The only time a man and a woman can be in the same match are if a woman comes out with a guy, or in a mixed tag match, where if a man tags in a woman, he has to leave the ring or get a DQ. A man can be disqualified for hitting a woman, even if she isn't part of the match at all.
  • Pro Wrestling usually averts this trope. One of the unwritten rules of the ring is that if you attack a wrestler you are fair game regardless of your gender. The crowd usually cheer when an abusive bitch gets her comeuppance.
    • That said, these cases will still usually have a bizarre tendency either reply by smacking the attacking woman to send her reeling or hitting them with their finishing move, with very little in between.
  • Intergender matches tend to have the woman as the face and the man as the heel. Whenever it's done the other way round, the woman has to be especially despicable and go to extremes to make the crowd boo her.
  • Completely averted in 2013 when Kaitlyn went mad from AJ's treatment of her and hit a referee during a fit of rage. She was Kayfabe fined $1000 and it was presented as her going off the deep end. Though when Kaitlyn went to apologize to the referee, he was more annoyed about being embarrassed in front his co-workers for being hit by a woman.
  • Also averted with regards to Eve's abuse of Zack Ryder. While it was entirely emotional abuse (manipulating him into believing she had feelings for him), she was still portrayed as unambiguously evil. When she kicked him in the balls at WrestleMania, it solidified her villainy - and she got a slapsticky comeuppance a couple of months later.
  • Averted heavily in the case of Chyna, who wrestled in the men's division for most of her time as an active wrestler. She was in the Royal Rumble, the King of the Ring tournament, and was a two-time Intercontinental Champion. At no point did anyone take it easy on her.
  • These days (since about 2009), the WWE plays it more-or-less entirely straight. On the very rare occasions that there is man-on-woman violence it is almost always depicted as an accident and treated as deadly serious. Meanwhile, Stephanie McMahnon has slapped half the roster in the face and pretty much any time there's any sort of mixed gender matches, the female babyface will wind up doing some sort of offense onto a male heel.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/DoubleStandardAbuseFemaleOnMale/ProfessionalWrestling