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Does This Remind You Of Anything: F Ilm
  • Pirates of the Caribbean:
    • When Barbossa calls the brawling Pirate Court to order, he steps onto the table with a pistol in one hand and, curiously, chain shot in the other. During his speech, we get a shot of Jack peering through his legs, where you can clearly see a pair of huge, cast-iron balls.
  • In The Pirates! In an Adventure with Scientists short 'So You Want to be a Pirate': "I just love long, hard things that go boom!" (referring to a cannon).
  • The movie Brick takes place in a modern high school, but sounds and plays like a 1940's/50s's Film Noir; one of the students who hangs out by himself is the know-it-all informant, and the principal is the police chief or DA threatening to rein in the hero.
  • X-Men:
    • In X-Men, Magneto's description of God sounds a lot like Professor X. Doubles as Fridge Brilliance after it's revealed in X2: X-Men United that Magneto views mutants to be gods among insects, and there is no one in the world he respects (and loves, as we learn in X-Men: First Class) more than his old friend.
    Magneto: I've always thought of God as a teacher, a bringer of light, wisdom, and understanding.
    • In X2: X-Men United, Bobby "comes out" with his mutant powers to his parents, who respond, "Have you tried ''not'' being a mutant?" Director Bryan Singer is gay, as is actor Ian McKellen, who was asked for assistance in writing this scene, basing it on a "coming out" conversation.
    • In X-Men: The Last Stand, Mystique refuses to answer to Raven Darkholme (her given name) because "that's my slave name."
    • In X-Men: First Class: Hank McCoy says about his mutation, "You didn't ask, so I didn't tell."
    • X-Men: Days of Future Past:

      Between going through a personal hell, his mind clearly not working straight, it being the 70s and him shooting up to dull the pain, Xavier really resembles a shell-shocked Vietnam veteran.

      The footage of the mutants fighting at the Paris Peace Conference is eerily reminiscent of the Zapruder film, right down to the small format and shaky cam.
  • In New Moon, one of the wolf pack's wives gets her face nearly clawed off because she made her wolfman angry. But she forgives him, and acts like it never happened, because that's what good women do. Unfortunate Implications abound whether or not this is meant to be taken literally (and with Stephenie Meyer's writing, who can say?)
  • In Drop Dead Gorgeous, Tammy's lines about rides on her tractor sound a lot like describing sex. She even has a smoke afterwards, which becomes a plot point.
  • In Transformers, Frenzy spread-eagling himself over a computer terminal he'd plugged into, twitching and yelping.
    • Transformers: Revenge of The Fallen: The girl who aggressively hits on Sam gets squirted in the face... just not by Sam. Of course, Sam doesn't really help the scene by yelling, "Oh my God your face! Lemme get some wetnaps for your face!"
  • The scene in Independence Day where Jimmy Wilder (Harry Connick Jr.) bends down on his knee to grab a wedding ring that fell on the floor, accidentally dropped by Captain Hillier (Will Smith). A fellow pilot walks into the men's locker room to see Wilder on one knee, making it look like he's proposing to his best friend.
  • The Spider-Man Trilogy:
    • Peter Parker's problem with, ah, "shooting blanks" in Spider-Man 2.
    • Spider-Man and Mary Jane's first kiss in Spider-Man? You know, the one where he's hanging upside down in the rain...
    • Depending on the audience, the following dialog might lead to snickers.
      Peter: Picking up where we left off.
      Mary Jane: Where was that? We never got on. You can't get off if you don't get on, Peter.
    • How about it in Spider-Man 3?
      Spider-Man: (pinning Venom down) You have to take off this suit!
      Venom: You'd like that, wouldn't you?
  • A classic example is from the late 80's comedy The Couch Trip where on a radio call-in show, John Burns (Dan Aykroyd) suggests to a man trying to overcome a problem with premature ejaculation, to imagine working on his car instead. His description of taking apart a transmission... well, if the caller had had the opposite problem, it would've helped.
  • Sir Ian McKellen's film version of Richard III. The setting is established right off as 30s Europe. Sure, why not? Then we come to Richard's coronation scene... and down come the long, red banners with his black-and-white emblem and fervent background chanting. Oh, right.
  • Like their TV series, The Star Trek films love to do this:
    • Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country is a big, honkin' allegory about the end of the Cold War. It starts off with the horrible disaster on the Klingon moon Praxis, (not in Chernobyl); which forces the Klingon Empire, (not the Soviet Union) to reach out to the Federation (not the West). Conservative hard-liners then kill (not attempt to kill) Gorkon (not Gorbachev) for his trouble. From there, it diverges a bit from actual history, but you get the picture.
    • Star Trek: First Contact. Picard's "The line is drawn here!" scene sounds like he's hell-bent on avenging his own rape especially when he uses euphemisms like "I will make them pay for what they've done!"
    • Star Trek Into Darkness: The Federation suffers a major attack on Earth, and the leaders of Starfleet, specifically Admiral Marcus, try to turn this into a war against the Klingons, who didn't have anything to do with the attack. Then Marcus orders Kirk to kill a terrorist by shooting photon torpedoes at the Klingon homeworld instead of bringing him in for trial. Real subtle, guys.
  • Don't Be a Menace features gangsta Loc Dog receiving a package of white powder from his friend, promising him that he'll get some when it's ready. Loc then measures, tests, and puts the powder in an apparatus on the stove. Of course at the end of the scene, it's shown that he's not processing heroin but rather baking a tasty cake instead.
  • In one version of the Dracula movie, Jonathan cuts his finger while dining with the Count, who gets a little too... excited about this and wants to suck Jonathan's finger.
    • In the Coppola version, Lucy enthuses about Quincy's big "thing" - namely, his bowie knife.
  • In Iron Man 1, Tony Stark is trying to unsuit himself...
    Tony: Hey! Ow, ah, ah!
    Jarvis: It is a tight fit, sir.
    Tony: (pained grunting)
    Jarvis: Sir, the more you struggle, the more this is going to hurt.
    Tony: Be gentle. This is my first time.
    • Tony's line when Pepper shows up immediately following the previous exchange sold the scene:
      Tony: Let's face it. This is NOT the worst thing you've caught me doing.
  • According to Entertainment Weekly's review of The Jonas Brothers' 3-D concert movie, there's one part where the brothers spray foam at the audience — out of a hose, if I remember the article correctly. The reviewer only hopes that the target audience doesn't see the symbolism in this.
  • CSA: The Confederate States of America, an Alternate History where the South won the Civil War, features several false propaganda films supposedly from the Fifties that portray those favoring the abolition of slavery as evil ("Watch out, because your neighbor could be an Abby!"). Later in the Mockumentary there's another propaganda piece that asks "Have you now, or have you ever been, a homosexual?" Both are intended to be similar to the Red Scare fear of communism.
  • There was a scene in City Slickers where Mitch and Phil are talking about what seems to be impotence but they're really talking about using the VCR. And they've been at it for four hours.
  • From The Dark Knight, when Joker falls out of his clown truck and Batman is driving towards him on the Batpod.
  • Who Framed Roger Rabbit. Is it just a fun Film Noir spoof, or an allegory on the Great American Streetcar Scandal? Why not both?
    • Also, Jessica Rabbit literally playing pattycake with another man is treated like an affair.
  • In Dragnet (the 1987 movie) there is this bit:
    Connie Swail (who has just been rescued from becoming a virgin sacrifice): How come his is so much bigger than yours?
    Officer Joe Friday: Miss?
    Connie Swail: The gun.
    Officer Joe Friday: I've never needed more.
  • Max drank about nine milkshakes with several party goers cheering him on in Max Keeble's Big Move in a manner that is very reminiscent of a binge drinking contest.
  • All the Boys Love Mandy Lane contains a very dark example: the scene wherein Mandy murders Chloe is heavily sexualized.
  • The song "Breakin' Out" in Shock Treatment plays over scenes of Brad escaping from the asylum. But listen to the words, and it seems to be about another kind of coming out entirely...
  • Hoo boy, this exchange in Commando when John convinces the villain (who looks like both a member of the village people and Freddy Mercury) to let go of his daughter and have a knife fight with him.
    John: You don't want to pull the trigger. You want to put the knife in me and look me in the eye and see what's going while you turn it. That's what you want to do, right?
    Bennett: (With an orgasmic expression on his face.) I can kill you John.
    John: Come on, let the girl go, just between you and me, don't deprive yourself of some pleasure, come on Bennett, let's party!
    Bennett: I can beat you, I don't need the girl hahah, I DON'T NEED THE GIRL! I don't need the gun John. I can beat you. I DON'T NEED NO GUN! AND I'LL KILL YOU NOW!
    • The fights ends with John impaling Bennett on a long hard steam pipe.
  • In Muppets from Space, the scene where Gonzo talks about being an alien sure sounds an awful lot like coming out of the closet...
  • In Police Academy 2, gun obsessive Eugene Tackleberry loses his virginity, for which he and his equally gun obsessed girlfriend have to take their guns out of their holsters etc and put them on the floor. As they do, the lights go off, and but a moment or two later a gunshot is heard.
  • In Girl with a Pearl Earring the scene where Vermeer pierces Griet's ear for her as well as touching her lips is symbolic of her losing her virginity as well as the scene where he sees her hair (it's played like he saw her naked).
  • In The Avengers, Loki tries to brainwash Tony Stark with his very long staff, but fails due to Tony's arc reactor protecting his heart.
    Loki (a confused and frustrated look upon his face): This usually works!
    Tony: Well, performance issues? It's not uncommon. One out of five...
  • Similar to Girl with a Pearl Earring, in Moonrise Kingdom, Suzy yelps when Sam is the first to penetrate her ... earlobe, with a fishhook.
  • Probably the reason why The Miracle Of Morgans Creek had so much trouble with The Hays Code is because the plot is basically a satire on the Nativity story.
  • Curt Connors' use of the Lizard serum in The Amazing Spider-Man is very reminiscent of a drug addiction.
    Rhys Ifans: So in a sense, it's almost like what crystal meth would do to an addict, where you feel all powerful and almost a sense of hubris that you can do anything, and that for Connors becomes addictive. That's why he returns to being the Lizard, and guys who are on powerful drugs want everyone else to feel the same, regardless of its social benefits. They want everyone to feel that great, because they feel great.
  • This scene in Scarface (1983).
  • The Split-Screen Phone Call between Ewan McGregor and Renee Zellweger in Down with Love has a strong sexual innuendo.
  • Pacific Rim: After their first spar, Raleigh is more convinced than ever that he and Mako are meant for each other...as co-pilots. According to Word of God, the implications were intentional.
    Raleigh: We're compatible! You felt it too, right?
  • Smoke Signals: Just replace "seats" with "land" during the scene when the two Native American protagonists find their bus seats have been stolen by two racist white men.
    Thomas: Um, excuse me? These are our seats.
    Man: You mean these were your seats.
    Victor: No, that's not what he means.
    Man: Now listen, these are our seats now. There ain't a damn thing you can do about it.
  • The fourth film of the Harry Potter film franchise has a certain scene in which Lord Voldemort and Harry scream and groan in some very suggestive ways. Especially if it is heard without the video.
    • It's even preceded by this line:
      Voldemort: (...) no matter, no matter. Things have changed. I can touch you, NOW!
  • Elysium:
    • As with District 9, Neil Blomkamp makes little effort to be subtle in his symbolism. Lets see, an impoverished and overcrowded land with a primarily Spanish-speaking population trying desperately to get to the place where all the wealth and resources seem to be concentrated. The mostly white, English-speaking population of the wealthy land aggressively trying to keep the masses of non-citizens at bay. The bulk of the film even takes place in Los Angeles, in case the rest was too subtle.
    • The movie also mirrors the "white flight" pattern seen in many American cities: minorities move into a city, causing middle- and and upper-class whites to move to the suburbs, and when minorities start moving to the suburbs, whites move to further suburbs. The logical conclusion to this is for the upper class to build their own space station..
  • Joseph Losey's The Assassination of Trotsky has a long and extremely graphic bullfight sequence about halfway through the movie, witnessed by the character who ultimately assassinates Trotsky. Quite possibly the most unsubtle (and needlessly grotesque) bit of foreshadowing in cinema history.
  • Mr. and Mrs. Smith: The conversation when they're discussing how many people they've killed plays out like they're discussing previous sexual partners.
    John Smith: How many? Ok... I'll go first, then. I don't keep exact count, but I'd say, uh, high 50s, low 60s. I mean, I know I've been around the block an all, but...
    Jane Smith: 312.
    John Smith: What? How?
    Jane Smith: Some were two at a time.
  • An early scene in French Cancan has showman Danglard and his newest starlet Nini visit a dance teacher to create a new version of the cancan. When they arrive at the studio, the dancers lounging around in their underwear look more like hookers than hoofers.
  • The Wolf of Wall Street: Set at a minor-league brokerage firm on Long Island that specializes in penny-stock pump-and-dump schemes? Most of the employees younger single men who indulge their considerable fortunes on hookers and cocaine at debauched company parties? Motivational speeches by a charismatic asshole who drives a Ferrari? If it sounds a lot like Boiler Room, it should—that film was also inspired by the real-life Stratton Oakmont firm.

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